Poor camping etiquette by fisherman

Discussion in 'Fly Fishing Forum' started by patrick barta, Aug 17, 2009.

  1. patrick barta

    patrick barta Love'em - N - Leave'em

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    I took the family down the Deschutes last week from Warm Springs to Maupin. We've made the trip several times in the past and of course had a great time... caught some nice fish too.

    We had an issue with some fly fisherman walking through our camp. Tell me if I'm being hyper sensitive here.

    We had our kitchen area set and were working on our tents when this guy who looked like he just walked out of an Orifice catalog comes walking right through the center of our camping site. He doesn't say a word, just strolls right thru. I give him the "what the F@#k are you doing" stare. I thought I got my point across without saying a word. The next morning while we're having breakfast another guy from the same group with his waders pulled up to his neck (even though it was perfect wet wading conditions) does the same thing. This time I had to say something and mentioned that it is really easy to avoid our camp site and he should walk around.... which he did. Not 5 minutes after, the guy from the previous day (mister Orifice) comes strolling though... again not saying a word. I stop him, tell him it's rude to wander through some ones camp site. I explain that if there is no possible way to avoid some ones site that the least you should do is first announce your presence, then ask permission to pass. He said he'd keep that in mind and that he was just looking for rising fish. I didn't ask him this but after I thought, so if there was a rising fish off our camp would he start fishing?

    This is not the first time this has happened on the Deschutes. Once a few years back another Orifice guy wonders through our camp to the river. On his return he does it again, without saying a word and my wife confronts him about his etiquette. I wasn't there to witness this but the guy blows up! Starts yelling at my wife about how he's fished this river for 10 years and nobody can tell him where he can't walk!

    Now... I understand that it's not our property and it belongs to everyone but when you set up a camp site it's like it becomes your living room, kitchen, bedroom all it one. I mean shit, in the old days you'd get your ass shot for doing something like that.

    The sad thing is I'm sure we're not the only ones these clowns did this to and it gives fly fisherman a black eye. I've never had anyone else wonder thru my camp site.... only fully Orifice equipped fly fisherman.

    Again... is it just me or am I being hyper sensitive?
     
  2. Brett Angel

    Brett Angel Member

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    No Patrick, you're not being hyper sensitive. I think it's a common courtesy issue, similar to a lot of unwritten fly fishing "rules", that people choose to follow or not to follow depending on how the situation benefits them. For those of you who might say walking through someones camp is not a big deal I would agree. If it's not a big deal just walk around the camp.
     
  3. Stewart

    Stewart Skunk Happens

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    Definitely hyper-sensitive. You're still about to blow an ass-gasket. I wouldn't have walked through your campsite without some kind of need to walk throught it, but sheesh, you're still pissed about two 15 second episodes of walking. :hmmm:
     
  4. tythetier

    tythetier Fish Slayer

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    'Orifice catalog'-LMAO!!!!!

    Unless he was peeping into your tent or stealing some bacon, I would of let him walk.... You are on the river after all....
    Better than a drunkie off the rubber hatch peeing on your camp fire!!!!
     
  5. Evan Smyth

    Evan Smyth Member

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    I think it just depends on the situation. If you are camped at one of the only easy access points to the river, then the fly fisherman probably has the right away. If there are tons of access points all around your site and the guy still walks right through your sight then that is just weird. I made the mistake of camping next to an outhouse before. Big mistake, not only does it smell bad but from 10 to 2 we would have every beer drinking fool in the entire campsite stumbling through or around our site. I definitely avoid this at all costs now.
     
  6. David Loy

    David Loy Senior Moment

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    Agree fully that any angler or walker should:
    A) avoid the center of your camp if reasonable.
    B) announce their presence on approach if not.

    However, in the old days no one shot anyone for walking through camp. More likely they'd be offered a cup of coffee and a chat. In my camp anyway. So yes, I'd say a little on the touchy side. JMO
    If you were referring specifically to someone yelling at your wife, I might give him a chance to apologize before correction with a big stick.
     
  7. East Fork

    East Fork Active Member

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    Was your camp spread out on both sides of the trail? If it was, you are being overly territorial. As for the water in front of your camp, you don't have any more rights to it than anyone else because of the proximity of your camp. Just my 2 cents. Regardless, I'd have probably walked around your camp.

    The regulations on the Deschutes force people to camp in close proximity in designated sites. I feel your frustration but you are going to get what you got camping on that stretch during prime time. Consider going in May, Septembert or October when the crowds thin out. Or take a few more days and do the Trout Creek to Maupin float - there are fewer people on that section if only because of White Horse. Check out the number of float passes issued at: http://www.boaterpass.com/
     
  8. smc

    smc Active Member

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    It sounds like you were camping right on the river, perhaps with an established riverside trail going through your campsite?

    It is rude to wander through ones campsite. But, if I were camped in a location like that then I would expect people to fish through, and yes, to target any rising fish they saw in the river, in front of my tent.

    If there was no trail, well... I guess I'd just say "hey, how ya doin?" as they wandered through. Then I suppose I'd ask them to go around, as you did. That "what the F&*^ are you doing" stare makes hard to get the behavior you're seeking. Besides, it's pretty obvious what he's doing, isn't it?

    One of the reasons I avoid established campgrounds.
     
  9. PT

    PT Physhicist

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    Hyper-sensitive? I don't think so. I'd just consider you a complete as*.

    Would it bother you if he started casting to rising fish in front of your campsite? It wouldn't bother me. I'd just watch for a while and eventually ask him what he's using, maybe talk about my own experience on the water, possibly offering something to drink...... I haven't found it to be too hard getting along with others on the water.
     
  10. bitterroot

    bitterroot Love vintage graphite!

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    IMHO,yes, that is poor etiquette. If at all possible I would avoid someone elses camp site. If it were not possible to avoid I would introduce myself to the folks, explain the dilema and ask that they forgive me for the intrusion. But again, I would avoid the intrusion if at all possible. Like a previous post said, camp sites become the livingroom, bedroom, kitchen of the occupant. It just doesn't seem right to come tromping on through without a word.
     
  11. EasyE

    EasyE Member

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    iagree
     
  12. lylelovett666

    lylelovett666 Active Member

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    I've skirted camp sites before but never walked through the middle.It seems out of line to cut through some ones camp without so much as a word.
     
  13. Kent Lufkin

    Kent Lufkin Remember when you could remember everything?

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    Herewith a parable:

    Years ago a friend and I backpacked up in to the Marble Mountain Wilderness Area west of Etna in far northern California. After fishing Campbell and Cliff lakes, we decided to bushwhack up the side of a mountain and sidehill around to a remote lake that we'd heard some rave reports about from the previous year.

    Turns out the lake was a complete bust and not worth spending the night at as we'd planned. Changing plans in mid-trip, we decided to climb up the side of the cirque to hit a ridgetop trail that contoured around to another lake.

    We hadn't planned on how strenuous and time-consuming picking our way up the talus slope would be and finally ended up at nightfall having just found the trail. Without lights, we decided the prudent thing would be to stay where we were, heat up little dinner and bed down, then head up the trail to our destination the next morning.

    But since were were on the side of a mountain, there was nothing like flat ground to roll out our sleeping bags. We thought a clever solution would be to simply sleep in the trail itself since it was the only even somewhat level area around.

    Problem was, we hadn't reckoned on how deer and other critters also used the trail as a nighttime thoroughfare to get from one spot on the mountain to another.

    All night long we were awakened by loud crashing and huffing as startled animals stumbled upon our sleeping bags and then detoured around our sleepless forms through the trees and brush. Groggy from sleepus interruptus, all we could do the next morning was curse those infernally rude deer for having kept us up all night.

    K
     
  14. Gary Thompson

    Gary Thompson dirty dog

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    I'm going to relate a story like Kents.
    My dad and I with his good friend and son were camping in Blue canyon Southern Oregon wilderness at a small lake that I can't remember the name of now.
    The spot we set up our fire ring was in the middle of a game trail and Bob and his dad set up their tent was also in the game trail.
    Well in the middle of the nite a herd of elk came along and the elk were pissed we were in their trail, kicked the shit out of pots and pans, fishing gear, Bob and dads tent.
    No one was hurt in our group, as for the elk. I don't know if any elk were hurt.
    O.K. back to your camping etiquette ?
    Yes, those fishers were rude.
    I would say to you sir. Don't put your camp so close to the river.
     
  15. ak_powder_monkey

    ak_powder_monkey Proud to Be Alaskan

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    I hike through peoples camps all the time, in camp grounds when folks are camped on the trail. Get over it, it happens. Next time don't camp on a trail.