Prop vs. Jet

Discussion in 'Watercraft' started by Plecoptera, Feb 17, 2010.

  1. Plecoptera

    Plecoptera Active Member

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    Thanks to the 1st time homeowner tax credit I will have have some money this spring to get a newer 4 stroke for my 15' Gregor. Right now its got an older 30hp with a prop, but I'm really leaning towards going with a jet. Looking at the Yamaha 40/30 in a jet, or the Honda 30 if I were to stick with a prop.

    Not sure how well the jet would perform on this hull (its an MX model w/ side console), but I know I will have to remove the last 3 feet of the keel to make it work with a jet. Another issue with these boats is although they are welded, the metal is pretty thin compared to most river sleds, so wouldn't want to take it anywhere too extreme.

    The boat would be used about 50% of the time in lakes and salt (maybe a trip to Seiku, E. Vancouver Is.), but I'm wanting to be able to use it on rivers and tidewater areas the other 50% where I would not feel comfortable with a prop. Just curious if anyone has made this switch. Do any of you jet guys run out in the salt too? I know the ideal situation would be to have 2 different boats, but I can only afford to make it work with 1.

    Any input or suggestions are appreciated.
     
  2. Milt Roe

    Milt Roe Active Member

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    I'd sure avoid running a jet unless you really need a jet (use more fuel with less speed and maneuverability). Trolling or positioning a boat in big water with a little wind in a jet is miserable. Sounds like the only time you really need a jet would be running upstream in small rivers and (maybe) fishing shallow tidewater. My experience has been that tidewater fishing is entirely manageable with a prop unless you plan to troll or run in extremely shallow water with a lot of boulders. I used a 16 ft boat with 70hp prop for years fishng SRC in the salt, you just need to be careful. Now I've got a 175hp that I fish tidewater with (not as brave with trolling or positioning the boat the shallows, but I'm usually anchoring and casting anyway. So it would seem to me that with the jet you only really gain the capability to run upstream in small rivers, but that would come with a relatively high sacrifice in cost, performance, and general enjoyment during all of your other fishing time.

    Also consider the etec 2 strokes - much lighter and higher torque with similar fuel economy and emissions (no stinky exhaust).

    My $.02
     
  3. Mark Walker

    Mark Walker Active Member

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    I'll second the E-Tec for consideration.:thumb:
     
  4. Trout Master

    Trout Master Active Member

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    the E-TEC is by far the best two stoke out there and burns cleaner then a four stroke. great power to weight also.
     
  5. Plecoptera

    Plecoptera Active Member

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    Ya, I've looked at those. Nice motors, but I heard bad things about the performance with a Jet. Also, not sure what you are referring to with the power:weight. I just checked their web site and a 40hp E-tec is about 230lbs vs the Yamaha F40 which is 215lbs.

    I'm kind of loyal to Yamaha's, and if I were to get a jet they at least offer them from the factory.
     
  6. Plecoptera

    Plecoptera Active Member

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    MR, good point about wind and rough water. I've got a bow mount electric that I can try using with the motor up to kind of simulate what it would be like with a jet. Another idea I had was getting a regular Yamaha F40, and then buy a jack plate and a jet unit for it. This way I could raise the motor for the jet. I fish the salt/lakes in the spring and summer, and larger rivers in the fall, so I would probably only need to change the lower unit a couple times a year.The tidewater areas I fish are full of stumps and logs, so it's a little unnerving running a prop, especially if I've just spent a few thousands dollars on one.
     
  7. Milt Roe

    Milt Roe Active Member

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    Good luck with whatever - Just offerring my opinions based on my own experiences. Trolling or positioning a boat with a prop isn't going to do a lot of damage even if you do run into something. You need to hit someting pretty hard to have a major cluster fck. Different story running upstream in a river and running out of water on a bar or finding a big rock. Just takes a second for a major wreck and repair job. Sounds to me like you have your mind made up, so go for it and let us know how it turns out. I shouldn't second guess your need anyway because I don't know your specific situation.

    I'll re-ckeck the weight issue - 240 seems like a lot for a 40hp 2 stroke. My 175 etec is only 420lbs. When I was younger and guiding in AK I used to toss a 40 hp motor over my shoulder and carry it a fair distance. Seems like 240 would be too much for that but that was 20+ years ago, and I was in great shape.
     
  8. shawn k

    shawn k Active Member

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    get a bay kit for your outboard so you can switch back and forth between a prop and jet. It costs some coin but will be cheaper tan buying a motor.
     
  9. willieboat

    willieboat Member

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    Plecoptera,
    I'm not familiar with your boat. But about your question about using jets in the salt. I run my 115 HP Yamaha jet in the salt all of the time. It takes a little more effort when you get home though. First the newer Yamaha's come with a hose attachment for flushing. You should do this for approximately 15 minutes without running the motor.

    Then you should buy either the ear muff type or the flushing attachement that you screw into the bolt that's located between the lower unit greese hose. With these your you start up the motor at run it for at least 15 minutes. I also rinse the exterior motor down with the garden hose.

    I have a small Yamah kicker that I do the same thing to when it's been in the salt.

    I hear about how the jet drink fuel, is loud and on and on. I find that at least Yamah had worked out these issues and I can't imagine how either would be an issue. Rivers, lakes, sound, go for it! :cool:
    Don
     
  10. ak_powder_monkey

    ak_powder_monkey Proud to Be Alaskan

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    Unless you plan on running nothing but really shallow rivers or setting gillnets there's little upside in a jet.

    You could get a motor that you can switch to a jet drive if you ever really need one, 1 motor 2 drives
     
  11. eimaj

    eimaj Member

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    I went trough this debate a few years back on my 14ft Jon boat. I planned on using mine in about the sam situation that you are talking about, but more shallow rivers for me. Even still I went with a prop. The key things for me were that a jet's operating range is 3/4-full throttle, a jet will not get a much load up onto plane as the same size prop, with a small outboard jet you might as well remove the reverse bucket because a paddle would work better :p , and depending on what your salt water looks like jet don't like kelp or seaweed. For got to add wear rings and impellers don't like pitting or build-up so if you do go that route you gotta make sure the whole thing get's flushed down well.
     
  12. Jerry Daschofsky

    Jerry Daschofsky Moderator Staff Member

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    Unless you're running rivers alot with it, go with a prop. I only had a sled because alot of the places I fished were rivers with a ton of shallow areas that a prop would've given me problems with. And I'm a HUGE fan of the Yamaha's myself. If I'd have kept my old sled, I would've upgraded the old Evinrude jet and kicker to a Yamaha 90 jet and the Yamaha 8 high thrust (loved that motor on my Dad's boat. But for my use, I needed the jet. For anything else I'd have went all prop.
     
  13. Plecoptera

    Plecoptera Active Member

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    Thanks for all the input. I think I'm going to start looking for a 40hp with a prop (preferably Yamaha), which would put me at the max hp rating for the boat. Looks like a jet may not be worth the hassle for a lot of the places I fish.

    There are still quite a few places I would like to fish that I can't get to with a prop, so later on I may invest in a jet unit and fab a removable transom riser. This way I could install the jet when I start fishing the rivers in the fall and then put the prop back on in the spring.
     
  14. longstick

    longstick Member

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    You need to stick with the prop. that boats is more of a sound and lake boat. the prop with make that boat hall ass and the also stick with the Yam. That boat was not design to run shallow water so stick with the prop and you can run the columbia, lakes, and the ocean. i would not run a pump in the salt, you can troll alot easier with the prop over the pump. Good luck
     
  15. freestoneangler

    freestoneangler Not to be confused with Freestone

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    My first jet-boat was a 16' Lowes with a 50 hp Merc -- owned for about 5 years and used exclusivey on the rivers, Cowlitz, Satsop, Wynoochee, Lewis. My second was a, 18' Wooldridge Alaskan w/90 HP OB which saw time on those same streams + Hood Canal and south sound. I liked both of them, but quite frankly like not maintaining boats period -- my pontoon boat and fatcat are the extent of watercraft today. While pumps are less efficient, they are way more versatile if you plan on spending anytime in rivers.