Redband?

Discussion in 'Fly Fishing Forum' started by junebug41, Jun 8, 2006.

  1. junebug41

    junebug41 Junior Dave Monti fan

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2005
    Messages:
    372
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Seattle, WA
    I'm attaching a photo from last fall and was wondering if anyone can tell me for sure whether this is a redband trout. I am not nearly familiar enough with the subtleties of rainbow subspecies identification to know. I noticed at the time that it was very different looking from the rainbows I've caught in western WA, and I found out later that there are redbands where this was caught.
     
  2. Michael Brady

    Michael Brady New Member

    Joined:
    May 18, 2004
    Messages:
    300
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Seattle, WA
    Home Page:
    Its definately an Oncorhynchus mykiss, but I couldnt tell you the subscript that comes after that. It really doenst matter between whats considered a "rainbow" and whats a "redband". Both the same fish, different location, different size, I guess you can have a different name if you want.
     
  3. Preston

    Preston Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2004
    Messages:
    3,165
    Likes Received:
    1,595
    Location:
    .
    Behnke splits Oncorhynchus mykiss into two major subspecies: O. m. irideus, the coastal rainbow and O. m. gairdneri, the interior, redband, or redside rainbow. The interior subspecies ranges east and north from the Columbia River drainage to the upper reaches of the Fraser (including the interior plateau and the Kamloops area), Finlay and Athabasca Rivers in BC and Alberta and, in the Snake River drainage, southeast to central and southeast Oregon, southwestern Montana and a small bit of northern Nevada.

    Typically, they are more profusely spotted than the coastal subspecies and often exhibit a pale orange or yellow "cutthroat" slash, aside from that they are very similar in appearance. All rainbows exhibit considerable variation in coloration and spotting patterns in differing habitats.
     
  4. mayvalley

    mayvalley Member

    Joined:
    May 27, 2005
    Messages:
    80
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Issaquah, WA
    Here's an example of color/spotting variation in a Yakima 'bow. Kind of a strange-looking fish.
     
  5. Tony Mull

    Tony Mull Member

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2004
    Messages:
    835
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Lake Stevens, WA, USA.
    i think the only reliable difference you'll find is that yellow or orange cutthroat. it's common in kamloops rainbows. the red stripe is influenced by environment, genetics and often spawning changes.
     
  6. Preston

    Preston Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2004
    Messages:
    3,165
    Likes Received:
    1,595
    Location:
    .
    May Valley,
    Looking at the overall coloration and the pattern of its spots I'd say that's almost certainly not a rainbow at all, but a westslope cutthroat, Ocorhynchus clarki lewisi.
     
  7. mayvalley

    mayvalley Member

    Joined:
    May 27, 2005
    Messages:
    80
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Issaquah, WA
    Interesting...how common are those on the Yakima? This one was nr Cle Elum this winter. I didn't think to look for any slashmarks below the jaw at the time.
     
  8. CovingtonFly

    CovingtonFly B.O.H.I.C.A. bend over here it comes again

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2006
    Messages:
    588
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    Covington, Wa
    That was in the winter? You have shorts on and it's sunny out.
     
  9. Smalma

    Smalma Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2004
    Messages:
    3,814
    Likes Received:
    2,530
    Location:
    Marysville, Washington
    Mayfly -
    I agree with Preston - your fish looks to be a cutthroat. They are not all that uncommon in the upper Yakima - much more common in the Cle Elum area than say in the lower Canyon. One the whole I have found the upper Yak cutts to be a more robust fish than the rainbows - just the opposite of what I see with the coastal fish. I'm never surprised to catch a cutt or two on that section (believe 6 in one day my best cutthroat day on the river).

    Tight lines
    Curt
     
  10. andycarey

    andycarey New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2005
    Messages:
    149
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Ashford & Olympia, WA
    Preston, interesting comments on the taxonomy of the trout; I always thought the common name "redside" referred to that subpecies/race on the Deschutes in OR and "redband" to those strange little trout down around Steen's Mountain, OR.
     
  11. craigmtb

    craigmtb New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2005
    Messages:
    33
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Auburn, Wa
    About the winter call, it looks like a beautiful summers day. especially when you see he has shorts on. However, after closer evaluation, you can actually seesnow or frost on the rocks by the river. He's crazy!
     
  12. Josh Benjamin

    Josh Benjamin Member

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2003
    Messages:
    988
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    duvall, wa
    Is it not 2 different people posting photos of 2 completely different fish?? the fish caught in the winter is the cutt...alls i see is a fish in a net, the guy in the shorts with the frost on the rocks is the 'bow in question, right or am i screwed up?? i don't think the guy in the shorts caught his fish in the winter.
    :confused:
     
  13. junebug41

    junebug41 Junior Dave Monti fan

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2005
    Messages:
    372
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Seattle, WA
    Allright, I admit it... I have been repeatedly accused of being crazy when it comes to wetwading way beyond the normal season. That was late September in the NE part of the state. Yeah, the water was pretty damned cold... especially in the morning. That said, I'm not sure that was frost on those rocks. Jeez, I hope not! It may just be some light coloration.

    The cuttie from the Yak sort of inadvertently hijacked the thread. I was just trying to find out if there's a way to tell a redband from a coastal rainbow in that photo. From what I gather so far, there isn't.:confused:
     
  14. Preston

    Preston Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2004
    Messages:
    3,165
    Likes Received:
    1,595
    Location:
    .
    Junebug41,
    What you've read here is about it. In Washington state, the natural range of the coastal rainbow is given by Behnke as the west slope of the Cascades and in the Columbia River as "...inland to the Cascades". I don't know if coastal rainbows have been widely planted in Washington outside their native range; many of the rainbows planted in eastern Washington are derived from Spokane River stocks which would, of course, be the interior subspecies. I don't think that appearance alone would be a surefire way to differentiate between the subspecies. I would assume that if the fish was taken in the northeastern part of the state, it's most likely Oncorhynchus mykiss gairdneri.

    Andycarey,
    Ah, what's in a name? Behnke identifies all of the interior rainbows as "redbands": O. m. gairdneri, "the Redband Trout of the Columbia River Basin (which would include the Deschutes) and O. m. newberryi, the Redband Trout of the Great Basin (Fort Rock basin, Harney-Malheur basin, Catlow basin, Warner Lakes basin, Goose Lakes basin, Chewaucan, basin and Upper Klamath Lake basin), etc. One man's sea-run cutthroat is another man's blueback and another's harvest trout.
     
  15. ssickle1

    ssickle1 Slow and Low

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2005
    Messages:
    171
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Hood River, OR
    Looks like a pretty generic looking bow to me. Nice fish though.

    The picture following is a cutty.

    I'm not a scientist and am not sure where the slang names come from. I'm from Oregon and redbands generally refer to eastside bows that live in arid sort of streams like the Blitzen and Malheur where temperatures can really sore. Redsides are like the bows on the Mac and the Deschutes south of Sherars.