Redington Predator

Discussion in 'Warm Water Species' started by thesankers, Sep 4, 2017.

  1. thesankers

    thesankers Active Member

    Mar 8, 2005
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    Richland, WA
    Over the past couple of years I have observed that as I try to fish bigger and bigger flies for largemouth, I tend to tire at the end of a session and my casting goes south. Bass specific lines (sage bass and SA titan) have helped me cast the big flies but the weight of these lines wear me out after a while.
    It occurred to me that a shorter rod might help since there should be less torque pulling on my arm all evening.

    I picked up a second generation 7' 11" 8 weight Redington Predator on the auction site for what seems like a good deal. Essentially brand new and less than 1/2 price.

    It took me a good amount of lawn time to adjust to this stiff shorter rod. It casts very differently than my other 8 weight- a Orvis zero Gravity mid-flex. With the adjustments made the Predator throws very tight loops even with an 8" hair bug. It seems to perform best with a very short stroke and a short quick haul. Effortless at the typical 40-50 feet which I cast to the bank when bass fishing. I am not a tremendous caster but could go about 75 feet without too much struggle on the lawn. On the water from my tube 60' seems like a more reasonable top end, but I don't ever cast farther than this while after bass anyway. As long as I concentrate on maintaining this short casting stroke I was able to cast more accurately than before and did not tire nearly as much as previously. This is great as it is so frustrating to have your casting fall apart just as the evening bite is coming on. Both the 8 weight Titan and the Sage smallmouth lines work well with this rod. Rod seems to cast well in the wind as well. Probably because I have been able to keep tight loops.

    The rod is stiff and is a bit much for 12' largemouth. On fish of three pounds and up it fishes nice with good back bone and the fight is still enjoyable.

    Rod is nice looking as well.

    I would buy it again.
  2. jersey

    jersey livin' the dream

    Sep 21, 2011
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    sonoma county
    The short rod is a bit easier to cast using the higher grain lines. Knocking out 20 to 40 foot casts, working the bug a bit, then lift and redirect, a lot, is tough. Much prefer the shorter rods for this.

    When dragging streamers on the same day, it's a bit funky the first few casts with a standard 9 footer. Typical cast break down for the first few tries.

    Have fun with your new stick!
  3. GAT

    GAT Dumbfounded

    Nov 16, 2012
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    Willamette Valley, OR
    Odd. Last week I bought a Predator rod but went with the 9 foot 7 weight model. I started using larger poppers this year and the 6 weight rod was struggling to cast the bugs where I wanted them to land. I thought about an 8 weight rod but sometimes I end up catching nothing but gills and an 8 weight is serious overkill for fighting a bluegill.

    Unfortunately, I normally fish for trout during the Fall so I'm not sure when I'll get a chance to cast the new rod... and the new Rio heavy taper line I bought to go with it. ....probably next Spring.
  4. longputt

    longputt Member

    Apr 19, 2017
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    I have had this same dilemma, for me I went 10 ' for 7....I fish long leaders 15 to 25 feet. My feeling is bass don't like to be lined. I haul very hard to turn over the fly. Slam the fly but don't let the line touch first.