"Rediscovering" Old Patterns

Discussion in 'Fly Tying' started by Thom Collins, Jul 6, 2013.

  1. Jack Devlin

    Jack Devlin Active Member

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    The Supervisor. A Maine smelt pattern from the 1940's that works for many species besides Atlantic Salmon. I've always liked this fly and use it often. Works well for sea run cutthroats, especially in the spring when there are chum and pink fry around. Although I haven't tried it yet for silvers, I'm betting it would work. I also use it in lakes. Generally, I tie them smaller and "skinnier" than the original Carrie Stevens style streamer.
    Jack
    View attachment 34725 View attachment 34860 View attachment 34726
     
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  2. John Weston

    John Weston Member

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    aw, the memorys of classic flies. I need to go and tie up some of these. thanks for starting this post. great fun and I need to get Patricks book. thanks.
    Outlaw
     
  3. Jim Speaker

    Jim Speaker Active Member

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    image.jpg

    A few weekends ago I got a coho in fresh water on this Thunder Mountain. I played a little game of "what won't they strike." Good fun!
     
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  4. Jim Wallace

    Jim Wallace Smells like low tide.

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    Jack, I like that Supervisor. The late Doug Rose wrote about it in his blog. I'll bet it would be a great pattern to troll in Lake Crescent in the Spring when the Kokanee fry are still schooling near the surface. I was thinking of swapping over the colors in the tail and beard. Gonna maybe tie one up with a white tail and red beard.
     
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  5. Thom Collins

    Thom Collins Active Member

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    Here it is November and great posts still are still trickling in. Wonder if there would be enough interest for a old school/clasic fly pattern swap? Probably been done though.
     
  6. Jim Speaker

    Jim Speaker Active Member

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    Jim, I was thinking the same thing about this pattern and will probably have some on hand when I go to Lake Crescent next June...
     
  7. Jack Devlin

    Jack Devlin Active Member

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    THE GIMP.
    Recently, someone posted a fly tied with an "aftershaft" feather. I was immediately reminded of an (obscure) pattern I tied many years ago which I found in an early "learn-to-tie" book I had. It was only a sixty or so page book by LACEY GEE . I still have the book but the cover is missing and I can't recall the title. The pattern is the "Gimp". I just made up a few. The GIMP is tied on a number 10 trout hook with a dun hackle tail, a grey wool body with two little "aftershafts" wings of the kind found only (as far as I know) at the base of the tippet feathers of the Golden Pheasant and the Amherest Pheasant. It is finished with a sparsely wrapped dun hackle collar. Quite easy to tie and I can vouch for its effectiveness for trout. I am sure that a larger version would surely be an effective Steelhead fly. I plan to try it.
    I wonder if anyone is familiar with this pattern? LACY GEE hailed from the great state of Nebraska and the book was published in 1955.
    Jack IMG_1637.jpg IMG_1640.JPG
     
  8. Jeff Dodd

    Jeff Dodd Active Member

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    I am slow to find this thread, but it made for awesome Sunday morning reading.

    I pulled out my copy of Roy Patrick's book and a 1965 edition of Flies of the Northwest so I could join in the fun. I am tying a box of flies for ou club Christmas auction.

    Here is more inspiration. Many have seen some version of this I know, but I am sure many have not.

    Gil Nyerges builds fly plates for local clubs. Usually with a spin off of his NW Favorites plate. I bought one a few years back. Gil's Nyerges Nymph is tied on the tippet at the top of the frame.

    Gil painted the picture, cut the glass, built the frame and of course.... tied the flies. IMG_20131124_085557_470-1.jpg
     
  9. zen leecher aka bill w

    zen leecher aka bill w born to work, forced to fish

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    The Nyerges Nymph.... I first heard of that at Ebey Lake in 1974. I was flogging the water from shore and these guys were out in float tubes catching trout. They spoke in code based off of their fly boxes..... three down and second to the right. Finally I had to ask them what the heck they were using and they finally spoke the truth.... a nyerges nymph. I had to ask, "what is that?" The ice was broken as one of them kicked to shore and shared some flies. A lesson was learned that day to always check your hook point if you are ticking brush behind you. I broke the point off and missed a number of strikes after that. Didn't find out why until quitting time. Someone blew the beaver dam that year and we had to hike in from below Hell Creek ( I think that was the name).
     
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  10. Jack Devlin

    Jack Devlin Active Member

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    I've never fished the Nyerges Nymph but I have a friend who never shuts up about the pattern.:) The ones he ties look more like a wooly worm with a crewcut. The original pattern just had hackles fibers below the body.
    Great to see the beautiful fly plate and painting and nice to see the actual fly. Thanks for showing us.
    Jack
     
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  11. Tim Cottage

    Tim Cottage Formerly tbc1415

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    I'm really liking the GIMP as a general lake pattern. In terms of reliable results this past season grey is running a close second to peacock herl. Need to tie some of these next time I sit in front of the vise.

    TC
     
  12. Thom Collins

    Thom Collins Active Member

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    This Youtube video references a book he had in 1966 called "Practical Flies" by Lacey Gee. Could that be it?

     
  13. Rick LaRiviere

    Rick LaRiviere Active Member

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    Some of those quill wing wets are deadly. A few years ago, I got into a peacock herl kick and tied up a few Leadwing Coachmen (and Picket Pins), and on my next outing gave the Coachmen a try. Did so well that I fished them on most every outing for the rest of the season, and had some really good success.

    Rick
     
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  14. Jack Devlin

    Jack Devlin Active Member

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  15. zen leecher aka bill w

    zen leecher aka bill w born to work, forced to fish

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    The Gimp was featured in a fly tying magazine within the past 5 years. My problem is I can't remember which one.