Reel Seat Spacer

Discussion in 'Rod Building' started by LD, Jun 25, 2012.

  1. LD

    LD Active Member

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    What is the common space or acceptable gap between the size of the butt and the id of the reel seat spacer? I am looking at a reel seat with a id of .435 and the rods are about .340, acceptable or to much space?
    Thanks
     
  2. Mike Monsos

    Mike Monsos AKA flyman219

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    That seems a bit excessive but if you go with that one you can use fiberglass drywall tape (the mesh kind) and use it to build up the blank to the necessary size. Check with the supplier and see if they may have a similar reelseat in a smaller size.

    Mike
     
  3. FT

    FT Active Member

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    I know what I'm about to write is heresay to a lot of folks, but it is something I've been doing since I build my first rod on a blank (it was on one of the first generation Fenwick HMG graphite blanks) way back in 1975 to make a "bushing" so the reel seat fits the blank. I'
    never had one fail and I've never had a reel seat move (including on spey rods) using this method.

    I use regular old tan colored 3/4" masking tape. It is use to make 3 bushings that are just a tad smaller than the reel seat's inside diameter. Two bushings are placed about 3/4" inside each end of the reel seat and the other one in the center of the reel seat. These bushing are wrapped on the blank by simply wrapping the masking tape around itself until the desired diameter is attained (yes, you have to test fit the reel seat to get it right keeping in mind that you need to have the reel seat have just a hint of friction drag on the bushings). The "bushings" are what supports the reel seat, the Rod Bond does. These masking tape "bushings" simply make it possible to keep the reel seat centered on the blank while the Rod Bond dries and bonds the reel seat to the rod blank.

    Once you have the 3 of them made, mix up a batch of U40 Rod Bond, smear it on the blank and bushings (making sure you completely fill in the space not occupied by the bushing and that the bushings are completely covered in the epoxy glue), then push the reel seat onto the bushings and wipe the excess Rod Bond from the end of the reel seat as it gets pushed onto it with something such as a coffee filter. Also make sure the "bushings" are completely covered in Rod Bond by twisting the reel seat about 1/3 turn and back again after it is in position.

    Then just let the rod sit for 8 hours or so (overnight works well) to let the Rod Bond completely cure. The final product won't fail because there is not way for water to get into the masking tape because the masking tape bushings are completely covered and sealed with Rod Bond. If you don't get the masking tape bushings completely covered (including the space between them and the space between the end of the reel seat and the end bushings) with Rod Bond, water can get into the masking tape and the bushings will fail, that is why it is important to make sure they are completely covered with Rod Bond before you push the reel seat into place. Dale Clemens wrote about doing this in his book on rod building that was published in like 1971 and that is where I got it from.
     
  4. gbeeman

    gbeeman Active Member

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    I use the same technique and have never had a problem.

    GBeeman
     
  5. Mike Monsos

    Mike Monsos AKA flyman219

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    The tape busihings worked well for me also before I swithched to the mesh drywall tape. The thing that is nice about the mesh tape is that you get the epoxy to bond through the mesh the full length of the reel seat. It's also not afected by water if some does happen to get under the reel seat seeing as it is made of some sort of plastic.
    Just my 2 cents worth. Both methods work great.

    Mike
     
  6. LD

    LD Active Member

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    I was looking at one of the reel seats offered by Steve Jenkins. They are a little different and have a nice clean look. The only id he offers is .435 and I am unable to turn one, so that is it.

    I used the masking tape method for my first two rods. I did goup the epoxy on fairly heavy so should be ok. But good tip to make sure the tape is complety covered.

    I was told about the joint tape method from a very good custom builder. I have used this the past two rods and really like it. Supporting the entire spacer makes sense to me, also not using any paper type product should be a positive as well.

    Is there any guide line for what the gap should be between the blank and the id of the spacer? Seems to me you should start narrow and file until it fits correctly? Is there a perfered amount of gap to make sure you will have enough epoxy?

    Thanks for the help.
     
  7. Mike Monsos

    Mike Monsos AKA flyman219

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    I aim for a nice easy slip on fit with or without the mesh tape build up if necessary. If you decide to file out your reel seat space be careful, there is not a lot of material to remove on a morticed reel seat under the reel foot. With my bamboo rods I turn down the blank if necessary to the reel seat spacer bore. On glass and graphite that is not possible so I would go to the larger bore and shim as required.

    Mike