Reverse spinners

Discussion in 'Fly Fishing Entomology' started by PhilR, Aug 1, 2016.

  1. PhilR

    PhilR In the time of chimpanzees, I was a monkey

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    I'm fishing at diamond lake in Oregon, and I'm seeing what I think are callibaetis hatching in kind of a funny way. Instead of popping out with wings up, their wings are flat on the water like a spinner. Then after about 30 seconds they put their wing up, and they take off about 10 seconds after that. Something I've never seen before.
     
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  2. PhilR

    PhilR In the time of chimpanzees, I was a monkey

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    I realized that I forgot the question part: is this normal for most mayflies, or for specific types of mayflies? Or have I made a Nobel-worthy discovery?

    It seems like a very risky way to emerge.
     
  3. Bob Newman

    Bob Newman Active Member

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    I have seen that very often with callibaetis. I think it may help dry their wings before they take off, pretty risky stage of life for them.
     
  4. GAT

    GAT Dumbfounded

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    They're just lazy critters. :)

    I've seen the same activity at East so it evidently isn't all that uncommon.
     
  5. Olive bugger

    Olive bugger Active Member

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    So much for that Nobel Peace Prize.
     
  6. theTastyPlecopteran

    theTastyPlecopteran Member

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    Mayfly wings fill hydraulically with water - maybe since they have the time and the waters still - it is easy to notice the process of them filling their wings after emergence. Sounds amazing.
     
  7. Taxon

    Taxon Moderator Staff Member

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    A mayfly expands its wings by pumping a yellowish green fluid called hemolymph into the veins of its wings.