NFR Rural life, new people and dogs

Roper

Idiot Savant
#62
I live in un-incorporated Snohomish County. We had a neighborhood jackass take exception to our dog being walked off leash. He threatened my wife with physical harm. I contacted the Sheriff and reported him. The Sheriff had a little talk with the jackass and we haven't seen or heard from him since. The Sheriff informed this jackass that per the law the dog needed to be under control, not leashed as so may folks think. Sasha heels, sits, and waits at each street crossing for us, only a few steps ahead. I'd say that's under control.

One time my wife took Sasha to Mukilteo, At the park there was another jackass only this time this one had two German Shepards. As the one attacked Sasha (it broke it's leash), she couldn't run because she was on a leash. Kinda like a corn dog for the Shepard. Sasha needed 30 stitches and still bears a scar. If I had been there I may well have shot both dogs and the owner...can anyone guess my position on this?

(quietly awaiting the flames...)
 

David Dalan

69°19'15.35" N 18°44'22.74" E
#63
I live in un-incorporated Snohomish County. We had a neighborhood jackass take exception to our dog being walked off leash. He threatened my wife with physical harm. I contacted the Sheriff and reported him. The Sheriff had a little talk with the jackass and we haven't seen or heard from him since. The Sheriff informed this jackass that per the law the dog needed to be under control, not leashed as so may folks think. Sasha heels, sits, and waits at each street crossing for us, only a few steps ahead. I'd say that's under control.

One time my wife took Sasha to Mukilteo, At the park there was another jackass only this time this one had two German Shepards. As the one attacked Sasha (it broke it's leash), she couldn't run because she was on a leash. Kinda like a corn dog for the Shepard. Sasha needed 30 stitches and still bears a scar. If I had been there I may well have shot both dogs and the owner...can anyone guess my position on this?

(quietly awaiting the flames...)

I see no need for flames. You're following the rules.
 

Ed Call

Well-Known Member
#64
My dog. How dangerous does he look to you? Most people that meet him for the first time are intimidated by him. Most people don't see a 195 lb. dog very often. There first question usually is "Is he friendly?"


I have had some very moving experiences with this dog. He has a way with children and especially those that have a fear of dogs. Over the years Kuma has helped numerous children move beyond thier fear of dogs and be able to pet and hug him. Sometimes the process took a few minutes. Other times Kuma would have to work with them for a half hour or more. He always seems to know just when to lay down or to sneak a small lick in. A wonderful animal to share life with.

This dog does not have any mean in him. None. Still he is always on a leash when we are out and about.

As much as I'd like to hang out with Kerry...I'd really like to chill with Kuma!
 

Trapper

Author, Writer, Photographer
#65
I found this thread to be very enlightening. When I think about a few other threads about dogs, it's very clear to me that there is a lot of passion on all sides of this issue. It's also very clear to me why most of the conflict between rural neighbors involve dogs.

Trapper
 

GAT

Dumbfounded
#66
I think this is common, too. One of my recently departed furry friends (well, 2008 isn't all that recent anymore), the black one in my avatar, was the sweetest dog you could imagine, friend to all, human or canine, except that when he was leashed he was unpredictable. I think it becomes a territoriality issue, when a dog doesn't feel like it has freedom to behave naturally.
Richard, yup, it is common condition. There's even a book out there on how to train your dog to overcome the problem... I bought the book, read the book, tried the techniques and decided it is easier to walk Mia on the other side of the street when I see someone walking another dog on leash that we'll end up meeting.

The vet who wrote the training book has the same I theory as to why some dogs are leash reactive. The dog is insecure because it is not in control of how it can behave. Our other dog, Sage, had no problem meeting other dogs when she was on a leash but we raised her from a puppy and we didn't Mia so maybe there is something there. Perhaps Sage knew she could trust us but Mia doesn't have the same trust. Just a theory.

When we're at the dog park or in the woods, when Mia meets another dog she does the meet and greet and there's never a problem -- as long as Mia on a leash. That's the common part with all dogs that have a problem meeting dogs when leashed. Off leash, no problem. On leash, problem.
 
#67
I used to live out in the sticks, way out.
I had to keep the dogs cabled or they would be gone, long gone, like never to return.
Every spring a neighbor and I would go dog hunting.
Any dog we found was shot on sight for chasing wild life.
Poodles were my favorite. Little shits can chase deer for miles and miles.
I have this to say about what you do with your dogs. Are you out of your mind!!!!!
 

Rick Todd

Active Member
#69
So far no one has mentioned my solution. My setter (as those of you who have hunted with her can confirm) is an aerobic machine and can run miles in a day chasing after birds. I live on 5 acres (and 2 acres in Winthrop) and both properties are invisible fenced. It works perfectly and Jetta has free rein of the whole property and spends her days chasing rabbits and robins! Her self exercise routine keeps her in excellent shape and she is a happy dog! Now my neighbor lets his big dog free all the time. He craps in our driveway right behind my garage and barks all night on full moons. Have talked to him and the humane society but no resolution after a couple years.
 

Rick Todd

Active Member
#70
BTW Trapper-I wondered how much of Wounded Knights is autobiographic and it appears at least the dog shooting may at least be cathartic for you! Loved the book right from the start! Just finished another book in the same genre, "River in the Sun" by Scott Richmond that also was a great read, based on the Deschutes River. Rick
 

Trapper

Author, Writer, Photographer
#71
BTW Trapper-I wondered how much of Wounded Knights is autobiographic and it appears at least the dog shooting may at least be cathartic for you! Loved the book right from the start! Just finished another book in the same genre, "River in the Sun" by Scott Richmond that also was a great read, based on the Deschutes River. Rick
Rick -- I'm glad you liked Wounded Knights.

I think authors tend to write about subjects familiar to them. Otherwise it means many hours of research and a high risk you won't get it right.

Trapper
 

Roper

Idiot Savant
#72
Every spring a neighbor and I would go dog hunting.
Any dog we found was shot on sight for chasing wild life.
Poodles were my favorite. Little shits can chase deer for miles and miles.
I hope you at least ate those dogs and didn't let good meat go to waste...
If not, you are indeed a "dirty dog"...:D
 

wadin' boot

Donny, you're out of your element...
#73
BTW ...Just finished another book in the same genre, "River in the Sun" by Scott Richmond that also was a great read, based on the Deschutes River. Rick
I think David Guterson's East of the Mountains has some plot that revolves around dogs getting hurt by dogs, been a while since I read it but if I recall right it was a sad read. Good, but sorta depressing.
 

jwg

Active Member
#75
So I'm paddling and fishing leech lake in a canoe and there is a kayak on the lake with a woman paddling and a little dog sitting in there with her.

Later...

I've got the van pulled in the loop, oriented perpendicular to the launch, and I'm securing the canoe on the racks. i,m facing away from the launch and suddenly there is a sharp pain in my leg.

The kayak had just arrived back at the launch and that dog just jumped right out and ran straight up the slope and bit me in the calf!

Of course the woman insisted it was nice friendly dog!