NFR Shotgun Barrel Length

Favorite Length Shotgun Barrel?


  • Total voters
    17
  • Poll closed .

freestoneangler

Not to be confused with Freestone
#4
First one that doesn't simply answer the poll and heads down that alley.. agreed. Honestly, I'm in the market for a new O/U and been going back and forth on length. I'm just curious what preferences are amongst the forum.
 

Bradley Miller

Dances with fish
#5
First one that doesn't simply answer the poll and heads down that alley.. agreed. Honestly, I'm in the market for a new O/U and been going back and forth on length. I'm just curious what preferences are amongst the forum.
Not sure of the other dimensions of this discussion: but I'm a medium small guy: I like a short barrel over/under for skeet. Thats after taking lessons at the local sportsmans club and using their 'range' guns: probably 28's. I like a shorter barrel.
 

zen leecher aka bill w

born to work, forced to fish
#6
28 inch barrels work for me on side by sides and o/u's. I have one 26 inch o/u and I wouldn't go any shorter than that. A 28 inch on a two barrel gun is close to a 26 inch barrel on a semi or pump. I'm not big on heavy or "clubby" feeling guns.
 

xdog

Active Member
#7
I grew up shooting 30 inch fixed full choke barrels. I have shot about every length barrel since then from 24"-32". I like 30" and up for waterfowl, sporting and upland.
I like to philosophize that a longer heavier gun is harder and slower to start swinging AND is also hard and slow to stop swinging.



Beretta 686 with 30 inch barrels and extended Briley choke tubes.

:)
 

Jim Ficklin

Genuine Montana Fossil
#11
While I did use longer tubes when waterfowling, my preference today is 26" - 28" with 26" being my choice in double-barrels. True, you must train yourself to "swing-thru"/follow-thru with lighter shotguns, but at my age I prefer the lighter guns in 28 & 20 gauges for my lengthy Upland hunting jaunts.
 

Roper

Idiot Savant
#13
Overall I think you'll find that 28" is a good all around length. I have a 28 gauge 870 with 25" barrel for tight cover, long walks for grouse. I have a Citori 625 also with 26 inch barrels that is 60/40 for rising pheasants. My 16 gauge BPS has a 26" barrel, but the 12 gauge has 28". The 16 is a good all around gun and the 12 is my duck gun. Lastly an RBL with 28 inch barrels that shoots like nobody's business, fast and on track. Each gun has it's own feel and purpose. Determine what this gun will be used for and go from there. Shopping for a gun in a gun store is hard and only half the job. If you want to test some guns up close and personal, hit buddies up to go to the range....BTW consider me a buddy.
 

Upton O

Blind hog fisherman
#14
As others have said, there is a lot more to it. Are you hunting or shooting targets? What is the weight of the gun, balance point, gauge that you need? I used a heavier 30" O/U 12 ga. for waterfowl, switched to 28" semi-autoloader due developing a bad elbow. I have a small variety of models, gauges and lengths, each is different in how I swing them on targets.

I also recommend you spend time at the range with friends trying different combinations so you can find what feels and shoots best for you. I shoot at the Tacoma Sportsman's Club, send a PM if you want to try some of them when the weather improves.
 

freestoneangler

Not to be confused with Freestone
#15
I grew up shooting 30 inch fixed full choke barrels. I have shot about every length barrel since then from 24"-32". I like 30" and up for waterfowl, sporting and upland.
I like to philosophize that a longer heavier gun is harder and slower to start swinging AND is also hard and slow to stop swinging.



Beretta 686 with 30 inch barrels and extended Briley choke tubes.

:)
My vote for the best photo of the year -- absolutely awesome!