SBS SilverFly Anchovy

Discussion in 'Fly Tying' started by SilverFly, Jun 21, 2015.

  1. SilverFly

    SilverFly Active Member

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    Well, if I start tying now I might have a dozen by July. Not that I'd share with a couple of comedians like you and Mr. Clark. ;)

    Actually as much of a pain as it was to tie this one, I think the process can be streamlined significantly.

    One cheat I stumbled on this time was to print out a pic of a real anchovy in high contrast gray scale. With the image inserted into a gallon ziploc bag, the flashabou can be laminated directly on top of the image. UV resin will cling to the bag in both wet and cured form, but it doesn't bond to it and peels off easily.

    The nice part here is that you don't have to be even a mediocre artist like myself to trace the outline and apply color in a realistic manner. There's really no reason to even use the eye blank if you can draw it directly on the flashabou by tracing. I would recommend wiping the cured resin with acetone or nail polish remover before using markers though. Any residual tackiness makes it difficult to draw on and will ruin the markers.


    20160130_112459.jpg
     
    Last edited: Jan 30, 2016
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  2. spadebit

    spadebit Active Member

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    What is the tail made from?! Awesome stuff you're creating!
     
  3. SilverFly

    SilverFly Active Member

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    Thanks. That last pic is a bit deceiving. It's actually the same fly in the previous set but is laying over a printed image of a real anchovy - and mostly hiding it.

    Putting the printed anchovy image inside the ziploc bag was a dual cheat in that I could laminate and trace the gill plate directly over it, and match the fly profile to the real thing. The head image below the fly is an enlarged version of the same under it. Just makes the details a bit easier to see when applying marks to the gill plate. I haven't gone so far as to make tails yet, but it has crossed my mind. There are some cool patterns that use feathers, trimmed to a tail shape.
     
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  4. tackleman

    tackleman Active Member

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    Just finished reading this whole thread and I must say whatever fish you catch, you've earned!
    Thanks for sharing this journey with us.
    I'll not likely get out to the tuna but the barracuda will see something new this winter.
    Excellent! Simply excellent!

    THANKS !!!!!
     
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  5. Jim Ficklin

    Jim Ficklin Genuine Montana Fossil

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    What tackleman said - pure artistry & masterfully done! Thanks for sharing.
     
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  6. SilverFly

    SilverFly Active Member

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    Thanks, glad you like it. And yes, it has been a process to say the least. The effort to hammer this thing out probably seems like overkill, and maybe it is, but I think it has been worth it.

    That process started with a lot of frustration. While I still have much to learn about offshore fishing, I have figured a few things out. When I first started fly fishing for albacore I stupidly assumed they would eat anything even remotely fish-like dropped in front of them.

    I found out otherwise after repeated refusals of dropping flies smack in the middle of boiling fish. At least with run and gun style fishing. Casting to fish worked into a feeding frenzy with lots of live chum is a different matter, but even then they can be somewhat selective, but not exactly something I would consider a challenge. At least hooking them. Not to say I have anything against chumming, it's pretty much a requirement offshore. I just don't like being heavily reliant on chum. Tuna are no different than any other fish, including trout, in that they will key on very specific prey. Matching the hatch can be just as important 40 miles offshore as it is on a river. Enter the need for patterns that seem overly realistic for what I once assumed were indiscriminate saltwater eating machines.

    Hopefully you will have success using it with 'cuda. I know they can be surprisingly picky too. I call it an anchovy pattern but there's no reason you couldn't adapt this to locally specific prey such as pilchards that they might be feeding on. I'm planning on doing sardine and herring versions as well.

    Good luck and let me know how you do!
     
    Last edited: May 29, 2016
  7. SilverFly

    SilverFly Active Member

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    Thanks Jim!

    I need to restock my supplies and get busy tying for tuna season which is coming up fast. I think I'm pretty much there with the pattern but still have a few minor tweaks in mind. I'll post them if they work out.
     
    Last edited: May 29, 2016
  8. Nick Clayton

    Nick Clayton Active Member

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    You'd better get crackin! Tuna are a matter of weeks away!
     
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  9. SilverFly

    SilverFly Active Member

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    Yeah, I know. I'll probably bang out a bunch of the basic versions like I was doing before the SBS got away from me. I know they work, but I'll feel better having some realistic versions for doing the deep soak thing when we're chunking IQF anchovies on the drift. You never know when something big, and really picky, might rise from the abyss as it follows the chum trail.

    Also, it's a good thing I have a few ready since it looks like I might get out for rockfish and maybe lings later this week.
     
    Last edited: Jun 3, 2016
  10. SilverFly

    SilverFly Active Member

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    Update:

    I found a much easier way to fabricate the gill plates using nylon mesh and iridescent mylar. The mesh is similar to the salvaged tea bag material I originally used with the Tea Bag Squid pattern, but found a better source in some sheer decorative ribbon from the local arts and crafts store. This stuff is basically the tea bag material in a roll.

    The technique may sound tedious but is actually fairly simple.

    1) Start by cutting swatches of ribbon and mylar slightly larger than the printed anchovy heads as shown in a previous post. Then lay a swatch of ribbon on the plastic bag overlaying it on the anchovy head.

    2) Using flexible UV resin (brushable CCG flex in this case) wet the ribbon to the outline of the anchovy head.

    3) Once the resin is brushed out evenly, overlay the mylar on the ribbon, smooth out and cure in place. At this point it's a good idea to wipe the surface of the mylar with rubbing alcohol to remove any UV resin to avoid damaging the pens in the next step.

    4) Using fine point Sharpie pens, trace the outline of the anchovy head as desired. I suggest starting with black to trace the pupil of the eye which can then be used as a reference point to align the gill plate if it shifts over the image (it likely will since the UV resin doesn't bond to the plastic bag). Next lightly trace the outline of the eye, followed by the outline of the head. Use black sparingly for the high contrast features then switch to progressively lighter colors. The colors I've been using are black, gray, navy blue, aqua with some accents in metallic silver, but feel free to experiment.

    5) Once the gill plate has been colored to match the head image, it's ready for the final coat of UV. For this you'll want to apply resin to the image outline using the brushable CCG flex. Start at the nose and work back applying a thin but relatively uniform layer to the image outline of the gill plate. Once cured fully, the gill plate can be peeled off and trimmed to shape. Repeat for both right and left head images to make a matched pair.

    6) Lastly, a drop of resin can be applied over each eye and cured for a more realistic look if desired.

    Once you get a feel for this you can laminate, and color a pair of gill plates in a few minutes. Most of the gill plate is exposed mylar so it's not like the whole thing is colored in. Gill plates made this way can be applied to the fly in the same way as posted previously.

    Here's a gill-plate with mylar applied over mesh, image traced, and ready for a final coat of UV resin.
    20160728_092421.jpg

    Tools, materials, and a finished set of gill-plates.

    Note: One thing I wasn't expecting with this approach was a "crinkling" effect with the mylar when the UV resin is applied and cured over it. I actually like the effect since it seems mimics the natural patterns in the gill-plate of a real fish. This effect can be varied with the amount of resin applied.

    20160728_101111.jpg
     
    Last edited: Aug 30, 2016
  11. SilverFly

    SilverFly Active Member

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    Finally got around to trying the newer style gill-plates and scale veils on actual flies. These are tied on 4/0 Gami SL12's.

    They're a little rough, but I'm a bit rusty and in box filling mode. Hopefully they'll be eaten in the next week or two.

    20160824_235347.jpg
     
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2016
  12. veilside180sx

    veilside180sx Active Member

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    Hopefully the fish come up higher in the water column. I guess they've been fishing 200+ gram jigs to go down and get them from depth.

    That aside...those look money
     
  13. SilverFly

    SilverFly Active Member

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    Thanks. Pretty sure I can fish at least 120' with the new line though. Are they deeper than that?

    BTW, are they eating squid?
     
  14. SilverFly

    SilverFly Active Member

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    Here's a set of easier scale veils. Pretty simple. Just a 2" swatch of mesh ribbon wetted with CCG Flex and 5 strips of medium (~1.5 mm) Lateral Scale stuck down for each veil pair. Once cured just peel, cut evenly down the center of the ribbon and cut out each veil. I trim each to a point to tie in easily at the eye of the hook. This also adds a bit more flash that can be seen underneath the gill plate.

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  15. SilverFly

    SilverFly Active Member

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    Also made a few other changes to the pattern that makes it much easier to tie and uses less material. Considering how much the thing has changed it's really a different fly from the original.

    For starters I've done away with the steps tying any fibers under the hook shank. Just no need with the traced gill plates.

    20160825_100033.jpg

    So I will probably post a new/condensed SBS at some point. At least one that isn't more like a blog. Also thinking the name Mugshot Minnow (/anchovy/sardine/etc) seems fitting with the gill plate tracing step. As far as I know that name isn't taken?
     
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2016
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