single foot guides

Discussion in 'Rod Building' started by mike doughty, Mar 22, 2006.

  1. mike doughty

    mike doughty Honorary Member

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    for those in the know, how do you keep the guide still while trying to wrap it? i tried but everytime my thread hit the guide it would move on me. pain in the ass, so i put double foot guides on instead.
     
  2. Jim Fitz

    Jim Fitz Member

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    Mike,

    My favorite way is to use little o-rings made from cutting up rubber tubing. You can actually buy o-rings for this but cutting up tubing is cheaper. Different size tubing is needed for different parts of the blank - obviously there is a large difference between the tip and the last stripper. One good source of tubing is fuel line material for alcohol powered remote controlled toys (cars, etc.) - hobby shops carry different sizes.

    I always put on the tubing, with some extras in case something goes wrong, right after marking the blank for guide placement. The main problem is finding tubing small enough for the top.

    I tried the hot glue stick approach and a couple of types of elastic thread but settled on the o-rings. Simple and pretty cheap. A couple of 1 foot pieces of tubing last a long time. Elastic thread (craft stores) is 2nd best from my limited experience. Hopefully you'll get some more good ideas here.
     
  3. James Mello

    James Mello Inventor of the "closed eye conjecture"

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    Buy the wide blue tape... The carefully cut across the width of the tape to get little pieces of tape. Then use a couple of them to hold the guide in place. When the thread gets to the first one, then take it off.

    Finally, there are a couple of things that you are probably being to fastidous about.

    1) The guides don't have to be on perfectly in order to get them on. You can always align them after they are done

    2) If they are moving that easily, you may be using too much tension. Try less tension and see if that helps.

    -- Cheers
    -- James
     
  4. mike doughty

    mike doughty Honorary Member

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    when i put guides on i just get them close and like you said i line them up as i go. with the double footed guides i use small strips of masking tape to hold them down and tried this with the single foot but just couldn't get them to stay. it's possible that i didn't have the tape tight enough. just trying to find an easier method
     
  5. Jim Fitz

    Jim Fitz Member

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    Mike,

    Your question was also posted on www.rodbuilding.org yesterday. It is a common question and has a lot of responses. I forgot about just using tape although I have done that a fair amount as well. As James says, use the blue tape. If you use regular masking tape you run up the chance that when you peel it off while you are wrapping, you'll have some residue to deal with when you hands are full dealing with the wrapping.

    Jim
     
  6. Nooksack Mac

    Nooksack Mac Active Member

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    I use a glue stick made for that purpose. Sorry I don't remember the brand, and I got it from the Dale Clemens company, which has gone under.
    You heat the guide foot, or feet, with a lighter, touch with the glue stick, then press them onto the blank. It's uncomfortably hot, but for just a few seconds; then it solidifies and holds the guide during the wrapping process, and doesn't show.
     
  7. Scott Behn

    Scott Behn Active Member

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    We use 1/2 masking tape that we cut into thinner strips. I lay my masking tape down flat on the edge of the power wrapper. I then cut a very thin (<1/8") strip of tape. I then peel up one end and place the guide under it so that the tape is crossing the top of the guide foot next to the ring. Then I place the guide on the blank with the tape already afixed to the guide foot and just continue to wrap the around the blank and over the guide foot covering the previous wrap of tape.

    Another thing could be to loosen up your tension a tad, especially as you get closer to the tip

    Also, I don't know what weight this rod is, check to see if your guide feet are not too big for your blank down towards the tip. Sometimes the guides feet are wider then the blank is round.

    :cool:
     
  8. willieboat

    willieboat Member

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    Small spot of super glue.

    Don
     
  9. mike doughty

    mike doughty Honorary Member

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    i thought about that but was not sure if it would affect/damage the blank at all.
     
  10. mike doughty

    mike doughty Honorary Member

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    masking tape is what i was using but maybe didn't have it tight enough. the rod is a 4 weight
     
  11. James Mello

    James Mello Inventor of the "closed eye conjecture"

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    Not to say that willie boat is wrong, but I would disagree with the super glue. I think it would make it impossible to correct misalignment, it could mar the rod finish, and depending on whether you have too much on, make it impossible to have a smooth clean finish.

    The reality is IMO, if the masking tape ain't holding it, then you need to rethink your technique. What is the specifics of what is going wrong when wrapping the single foot guides?

    -- Cheers
    -- James
     
  12. Wayne Kohan

    Wayne Kohan fish-ician

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    The reality is IMO, if the masking tape ain't holding it, then you need to rethink your technique. What is the specifics of what is going wrong when wrapping the single foot guides?

    -- Cheers
    -- James[/QUOTE]

    The problem I had with single foot guides was that as I started the wrap up the foot, it would push the guide back. I think that I would do better if I file the guide feet to a thinner height before starting.

    I like the idea of bands as I think that might hold things still. The problem with any tape is that towards the tip, there just is not enough rod for the tape to grip and hold the guide still, especially if you are using a thin strip.


    Wayne
     
  13. James Mello

    James Mello Inventor of the "closed eye conjecture"

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    Yeah, it sounds like you should do some more dressing of the guide foot prior to the wrap. My guide feet tend to have a gentle slope from front to back, and the very end has been filed to a slightly rounded point. It seems to me that you may have broad tips on your guide feet, so the thread pushes it forward. Another thing you can do is instead of trying to wrap closely up to the guide foot, wrap 2 or 3 wraps slightly further up the guide and use a burnisher to push the wraps tight again.

    Finally, there are a few things with the tape that can help :)

    1) Use fresh tape. The stuff sitting in your garage for 5 years tends to deteriorate. The sticky stuff just seems to degrade over time, so using old stuff doesn't work well.

    2) Buy good tape. The good stuff sticks well, but doesn't leave residue. The bad stuff doesn't stick well and leaves residue. I use the blue 3M stuff

    3) Don't handle the tape with your fingers. Use 2 pairs of tweezers or a bodkin and some tweezers. Seems to install faster on the smaller tips, and it doesn't rub off the sticky stuff.

    4) Use a relatively tall wrap of tape in front of the guide. I do that just to mark were the guides are supposed to go, and perhaps this "blocking" piece of tape is the reason why my guides don't creep forward. If you plan on doing locking wraps this may not work...

    5) Put the tape on the guide, then wrap on the blank. Doing it this way seems to make it so that you handle it less.

    -- Cheers
    -- James
     
  14. kenai

    kenai New Member

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    james has got it! dress up your guide feet so that the thread will climb the guide foot easily. the guide is moving because the thread is pushing it. i make mine as thin as i can and then use emory cloth to clean it up. besides making the
    wrapping easier it looks a whole lot better too and by the way, i don't think you
    can beat using the tubing, very simple and works well, try it. good luck--tony--
     
  15. Wayne Kohan

    Wayne Kohan fish-ician

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    While we're on the subject, what do you do to 'dress' the guide foot? I've tried filing by hand, but have trouble holding the guides still while filing. I've also tried using a Dremel, but don't feel I have great control of that either. Do all guide feet need to be filed? Many brands claim they don't need to be. Finally, I haven't used color preserver in my thread so that the guide feet show through. Is there any issue with filing from a cosmetic point of view?

    Maybe this should be a different thread.

    Wayne