size of flies?

Discussion in 'Spey Clave' started by kimosabe, Jul 1, 2007.

  1. obiwankanobi

    obiwankanobi Active Member

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    Christ Almighty.............I was hoping to learn how to catch more steelhead so I could take out the fine honey's at the the clubs........damn!

    Although I did manage to tag a native blonde on the July 4th that I met at a coffee shop that day and I haven't caught a steelhead in ages......so maybe the reverse is true..
     
  2. Coach Duff

    Coach Duff Banned or Parked

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    I take that back

    CHICKS DIG POPPY!!!!!!!!!
     
  3. James Mello

    James Mello Inventor of the "closed eye conjecture"

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    Dude, everyone knows it's about girth, not length... That's why I chase my quarry with a 5 1/2" 14wt....
     
  4. TallFlyGuy

    TallFlyGuy Adipossessed!

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    Actually, I believe it takes more skill and effort to cast those big ass flies and tips than those graceful floating lines. I had a chance to cast a long belly line at the clave, and I was like, "damn this is fun." At least for me it is much easier to cast lines without weighted flies. So a fish out of water, not really.

    Yes, we do catch fish when noone else does. Just ask some of the locals and gear guides on some of the rivers SM and me fish. They are throwing bait to spinners at em, and nothing. Then we pull fish out of there with flies..It's luck

    Your posts and claims say otherwise.
     
  5. TallFlyGuy

    TallFlyGuy Adipossessed!

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    Yep, girls in Bikinis, Red Shed Groupies all over the damn place!:beer2: :beer2:
     
  6. inland

    inland Active Member

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    Justin,

    You kill me...cast a longbelly once at a clave. Not fished one. But instantly claim easy money. This is why I keep poking. If the long belly lines are so easy why did the steelhead world switch to the lines you are using? And develop commercially available floating tips for them recently too. Certainly not because they are harder.

    When are you going to be out east? I would love to see your casting because if even 2% of what you are saying is true I am sure there is much to learn. After several thousands of hours casting practice on top of fishing I still feel challenged throwing longbellies. You must have it dialed in right out of the chute.

    When have I made any claims? The insinuations you read in my posts are based upon 'great angler standard'. Harry Lemire, Mike Kinney, Carl Perry, Steve Pettit, Bill McMillan, etc. I can at least acknowledge that I don't know crap in comparison. After 15 years still a complete neophyte. Are you saying, with complete conviction, that you are ready to run with the big dogs because of local success??? At your age you have learned all there is to know about casting and fishing?

    William
     
  7. TallFlyGuy

    TallFlyGuy Adipossessed!

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    Hehe, Ok, so I haven't fished the longbellied lines, and the line didn't have a fly on it. The line was an Airflo Delta long. Not sure if that is considered a "long belly" line. It was a joy to cast. It wasn't picture perfect casting, but I was able to shoot the line out a little as well as having the whole head out. Not sure if that is considered proficient casting, but it was fun. It just felt neat. Not considering I know everything, but not saying I don't know anything either :D .
     
  8. luckybalbowa

    luckybalbowa Member

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    woah....

    what a topic!!! It seems like we have a penis measuring contest here.

    I'm glad that I fish for my own enjoyment and dont give a rats behind what others fish with.
     
  9. TallFlyGuy

    TallFlyGuy Adipossessed!

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    Too funny Lucky. Fun fishing with you today, Mr. Troutman!
     
  10. luckybalbowa

    luckybalbowa Member

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    ditto, Mr. Kalama! :)

    we'll have to do it again. We can use my 7" long sand shrimp imitation!
     
  11. fredaevans

    fredaevans Active Member

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    There are times ......

    Question was asked above 'what doesn't work.' I have the answer ........ (at times) ANY fly I happen to choose for the end my leader!:rofl: :beathead:
     
  12. o mykiss

    o mykiss Active Member

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    This is one of the more interesting threads here in a long time. I've got a question for Poppy and Inland about fishing a floating line and smaller flies. How would you characterize the water where you have the most success fishing this way (depth, current speed, etc.)? I would love to experience some success with a floating line but it has basically eluded me. I wonder if I'm just not fishing the right kind of water. Is the water you fish with a dry line and small fly any different than what those of us who tend towards sink tips and larger flies would fish? Or do you have success with your methods in all different types of water?
     
  13. Panhandle

    Panhandle Active Member

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    Though I'm nowhere in the realm of Inland, I can answer this question from my own experience having grown up in the PNW and fishing tips and large profile flies in contrast to living here now. All the water I would fish with tips in Oregon I now fish over here with floaters or an intermediate. I use the intermediate just to get more line control when I want the fly a little deeper in the water column faster. The difference is that the fish tend to suspend further up in the water column, move further, and look up. To me that's really it--- fish the same water.
     
  14. Red Shed

    Red Shed "junkyard spey"

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    Before I answer I must clear up one point. My friend Obiwan called me a "jedi", and while I appreciate his confidence I will say I am not a "jedi", steelheader nor caster. While I catch my share I do not consider myself to be a great steelhead fly fisherman. My connection to steelheading is my love for chrome bright fish and visiting with all those that chase them.

    When I started fishing the Clearwater I used an 8'6" rod and a type 4 shooting head with a #4-4X long purple woolly worm on the swing. I didn't think of the water as being good for a sinktip or floating line. I just read steelheaders used fast sinking shooting heads and that's what I used as well. The water I fished just looked "fishy".

    Then I read Trey's book Steelhead Fly Fishing and Flies. He talked about "greased line fishing". I also heard about guys named Mark Noble, Bill McMillan, and some of the other greats. I read everything I could get my hands on pretaining to steelhead fly fishing. I started trying my floating line in the same spots I fished before. It never occurred to me to think about the water depth. The water was "fishy" and I saw no reason to think a steelhead would not rise up to my fly and some did. That is pretty much my same criteria today. I don't know how deep it is. I can't wade across most of it but none of it strikes me as being to deep for a fish to rise to my fly. I might be just to dumb to know any better but if it looks "fishy" I will fish there.
     
  15. FT

    FT Active Member

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    TallFlyGuy,

    I've tried to stay out of this because many times people misunderstand what I write when I disagree with someone due to my proclivity of attempting to both teach something and provide an explanation of my rationale. But here goes.

    A long-belly line has a belly length of 75' to 105'. The Delta Long has a belly 65' long, which puts it in the mid-belly category (just like the RIO Midspey and SA Mastery spey lines). There is a huge difference between casting the mid-belly lines with their 65' belly and casting a long-belly, especially those that have bellies of 85' and longer. How do I know this, simple, I fish long-bellies on all my rods of 14' and longer both summer and winter. I use everything from floating tips to type 8 sink tips to 12' sections of 700 gr Deep Water Express, and I fish rods of 13', 14', 15', 16', and 18'.

    Put another way, I can fish 90' to 100' without shooting any line with the long-belly lines, and if I have a need to cast beyond 100' to reach a distant lie, all I need to do is shoot 10' to 20' of line to hit lies at 110' to 120' out, which opens up some water to me not available to those who don't cast that far. However, most of my fishing is done between 60' and 80'.

    Once the rivers drop to their normal summer low, I use floating lines exclusively with small wets and skated dries. I live on the wet side and fish the "S" rivers most of the time because they are my local waters and I've caught my share of steelhead on skated dries or small wets (including true low-water wets tied with the tail not protruding more than half way along the shank (i.e. the tail ends before reaching the hook point).

    This discussion reminds me of when I first moved to Port Angeles and became close friends with Manuel (he used to own the Quality Fly Shop, which he closed after retiring a few years ago). Manuel is a very good steelheader, but he used sinking shooting heads exclusively when I met him and got to know him regardless of winter of summer. This is how he learned to fly fish for steelhead when he grew up in Fortuna, CA and how he used to fish in summer/fall. He thought I was nuts fishing with floating line and skated dries or small wets on the OP rivers around Forks until he and I started to go fishing together and he saw me catching fish with the floating line and skated dries or small wets. He decided to try floating lines, gave up his beloved sinking shooting heads, and ended up catching more fish.

    After retiring, closing the shop, and moving back to Fortuna, CA, he took to using floating lines and skated dries or small wets on the rivers of Northern CA and found he was having more fun and many times outfishing his friends there who used sinking shooting heads.

    I should tell you that Manuel was 51 years old when he first tried a floating line for steelhead. He began fly fishing for steelhead when he was 11 years old. In other words, for 40 years he never fished a floating line for steelhead because he thought that you had to use #4 or larger flies (unless fishing for the Klamath's half-pounders, when he used sinking shooting heads and #6 or #8 flies) to hook steelhead in summer and winter. After he found you can hook coastal steelhead on floating lines and skated dries or small wets (#6-#10), that is what he exclusively fishes with after the rivers drop to their summer low.

    My very good friend Bob Arnold (yes, the one who wrote STEELHEAD WATER and DRY LINE STEELHEAD), Geroge McLeod (who I see every summer and share the run with in front of his place on the Stilly), and others I know but who will not be named all switch to floating lines and small wets or dries after the rivers drop to their summer lows. There must be something to using floating lines and skated dries or small wets for summer fishing after the rivers drop, or these well-known and very experienced steelheaders would not use them.