Skagit casting from a tube

Discussion in 'Stillwater' started by Jiminsandiego, Nov 28, 2017.

  1. Jiminsandiego

    Jiminsandiego Active Member

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    In another thread I talked about seeing a fisherman using a OPST commando head. He was standing in his boat and casting a very impressive distance, using a 9' single hand rod. I've watched videos of Skagit casting but until yesterday had little interest. But now I want to try it. After some research it seems that (with my 9' 5 wt rod) Lazer line (35lb test) running line tied to a 200 grain command0 head with a 7.5 ft sinking tip ( run or bucket/ #4 or #6) with a regular tippet is what I want to try ($105). You tube videos showing guys casting this way from float tubes makes it look very effective (and fun). Any input is, as always, much appreciated, Jim
     
  2. cmann886

    cmann886 Active Member

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    I’ve never cast that set up from a tube. I have however used the set up that you described except with 25 lb later line with an 8.5’ Gloomis Stream Dance 5 wt. in alpine lakes with little to no back cast room. My only Lake Trout was caught with this set up on a trip to the Wind River Range in Wyoming. It is easy to covert anything that you need to, and can even rig the commando head backward when you want to use a floating line and fly and get a slightly more delicate landing from your cast.

    I have used OPST Commando heads on several rods both single and two handed in various weights and really enjoy the results. One of my favorites is a 300 gr with a 7 wt. Winston IIBX.

    When I choose to use a single handed rod these days...which is getting increasingly less, about half the time I am using a single handed spey set up. Fishing the lower Yakima for SMB is a blast with this type of set up. I enjoy it so much that I recently built a short (7’9”) 3/4 for a 175 gr to use from a boat and on some small streams with larger streamers.

    Be careful when you start down this path you will grow to love it if you give it a little time and practice and find one more thing to spend $ on.
     
  3. Jiminsandiego

    Jiminsandiego Active Member

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    So after a few months of fishing with a full sink it appears that I can cast out about 40'. However that requires at least a couple of "false casts" that actually hit the water before I can shoot out the rest of the line. I find it difficult to keep the "false casts" above the water. I feel like I am spooking the fish and after seeing a guy double that distance without splashing the water near the fish, I am on a mission. I've been watching you tube videos.. switch spey, single spey, Perry poke, circle spey etc... I believe the guy I saw was using a Perry Poke cast. I find that casting is a fun aspect of this sport so I plan on giving single hand skagit casting a try. I'm trying to educate myself but any input on this subject would be much appreciated. Thanks, Jim
     
  4. Steve Kokita

    Steve Kokita FISHON206

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    I find it most effective using the double whammy zero blammy with bamboo rods.....
     
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  5. Jiminsandiego

    Jiminsandiego Active Member

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    I was hoping for input from you. Lord knows I respect the short bamboo rod style of fishing, and I hope to one day experience that experience. That being said, I am curious if you have ever been curious about the whole spey/skagit style of casting. It seems like two ends of a spectrum. I truly believe that casting distance has minimal effect on results, but damn it, I want to be able to cast far (because it looks cool). Then, and only then, will I be able to appreciate a 6' bamboo rod. Just a newbie trying to find my way. Cheers, Jim
     
  6. wanative

    wanative Active Member

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    Have you ever had anybody help you with one on one casting instruction?

    Getting the timing down with your hauling on the backcast and forward casting stroke is one of the most difficult things to learn in fly casting but will dramatically decrease your slapping the water and increase distance, plus keeping your Rod tip higher on the forward and Back cast will help.
    Check out the double haul single hand fly cast on you tube. I hope this will help.
     
  7. Jiminsandiego

    Jiminsandiego Active Member

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    No doubt I am in dire need of instruction. I've watched many, many You Tube videos and am always trying to apply that knowledge as I fish. Using a full sink is probably not the easiest way to learn, as I have to strip the line most of the way in before casting. After watching the guy using a Commando head I could not help but think to myself "I want to try that". The videos showing " single handed Spey casting" make it look really fun. I have a lot to learn but that's what makes casting so much fun for me. Thanks for the input.
     
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  8. Dustin Bise

    Dustin Bise Active Member

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    i dont see the point... most spey cast is a roll cast with a directional change. why not just face the direction you want to cast and make a roll cast?
     
  9. Jiminsandiego

    Jiminsandiego Active Member

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    I get very limited distance with a roll cast. I've read that it is possible to use the various spey techniques with any line, but it is much more effective using lines such as the Commando heads. These are very heavy, short (13') heads attached to a very supple shooting line (Laser line). The tips can have different sink rates (and floating), come in various lengths and can be quickly changed. Not having to have room behind you is also an advantage allowing you to cast away from shore as an option. But for me the first time a saw someone use the "Perry Poke" method I was impressed. Kind of like a roll cast but with a ton of distance. Spey casting seems rather complex (to me) but I have been told that some people go fishing more for the fun of casting than catching. I assumed you had to be standing up to spey cast but this is not the case. The relatively new short "Skagit" heads negate the need to buy a different rod and for $105 it may very well provide me with more effective casts and lots of fun. Jim
     
  10. Nick Clayton

    Nick Clayton Active Member

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    Sounds to me like you would benefit most from casting lessons. Absolutely no offense intended but IMO you should be able to cast further than 40' with very little effort. Either you have picked up a lot of bad casting habits along the way, or your line is a terrible match for your rod. Neither issue is solved by going the commando system route.

    Take the money you were going to spend on a commando setup and invest in some casting lessons. I'm guessing that would give you the most bang for your buck.

    Oh, even though I think casting is the issue here, there's no reason in the world you shouldn't be able to catch plenty of fish out of a tube casting no further than 40'.
     
  11. Stonefish

    Stonefish Triploid, Humpy & Seaplane Hater

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    No doubt the Commando system has lots of applications, but as Nick said it likely won't solve your casting issues.
    One thing you might consider if you plan on fishing lakes in the future is getting a craft that allows you to stand when casting.

    This really helped my lake fishing a lot, especially when using longer leaders for chironomid fishing.
    SF
     
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  12. Nick Clayton

    Nick Clayton Active Member

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    Or if you plan to stick to a tube consider trying a 10-11 foot rod. I used to really enjoy longer rods out of my tube.

    Another thing to consider is personally I wouldn't really want to use a commando system, complete with super thin running line and loop-to-loop connections in a scenario where I would be doing a lot or retrieving. That's just personal preference though.
     
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  13. Jiminsandiego

    Jiminsandiego Active Member

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    Thanks for the input folks, much appreciated. I try to watch other people but so far have had little opportunity to observe people casting full sink lines. What would be a typical number of false casts (and would they touch the water ahead of you) and what would be a realistic distance that a fairly competent caster could reach using a 9'5wt with full sink line from a tube? I know those are tough questions but a general idea would be enlightening. Thanks again Jim
     
  14. cmann886

    cmann886 Active Member

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    I can guarantee it is a bunch of fun and relatively inexpensive way to increase your enjoyment while fly fishing and you will quickly develop very effective casts. Just don’t get suckered into always going for distance...focus on presentation or your catch rate will decrease. Only you can decide if the enjoyment of casting outweighs the fun of catching fish.
     
  15. troutpocket

    troutpocket Active Member

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    I use a 9' 5wt and SA Streamer Express 150gr line as a fast sinker. It's a shooting head configuration and I really like it for stripping buggers/streamers in lakes. In my tube, I'll strip in the line until just the leader is out of the guides. First step is a roll cast to "flop" out the leader and maybe 10' of the head directly in front of me. Next I’ll pick up off the surface and make a cast with my goal to get most of the head out of the guides. Second cast is another water load and this time I let the whole head fly on the forwards stroke and usually reach 50-60' (I get another 10-15' of distance if I'm casting standing in my pram). So yeah, each step of the cast touches the water in front of me but I'm usually targeting fish that are at least 10' down so I'm not too worried about spooking them. It's not pretty but it works.
     
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