Some Switch Rod Information

Discussion in 'Spey Clave' started by Ed Call, Sep 9, 2010.

  1. James Waggoner

    James Waggoner Active Member

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    Just a couple of thoughts:

    For smaller rivers with very limited backcast and overhead branches, the switch rod is a great tool. Yeah sure you can spey cast a single hander, but your wrist may not hold out spey casting an 8wt for a day of steelheading. I will admit it's not always the right tool... for instance, fishing for trout on the Deshutes is best left to an 8'-9' 5wt (At times even a 7' rod may be nice), where fly placement and line control at 15'-30' is the difference in having a good day fishing and being skunked.

    Anyway, they should just let the term "switch rod" fade into the past, it's really just a short spey rod. Aside from just getting line out, when you first step into a run, does anyone really "switch" between single handed and spey casting/two handed overhead casting? If the answer is yes, perhaps I don't understand what the term "switch" means or is in regard too, when applied to a 11' or shorter spey rod. To me my 5wt single hander is more of a swith rod, I often times switch between single handed traditional casting and single handed spey casting throughout a given day...sometimes even using both hands.

    Just a couple of thoughts,

    James.
     
  2. shotgunner

    shotgunner Anywhere ~ Anytime

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    Sorry Ed; Off topic..

    Some interesting observations. To my knowledge, the term 'Switch' was coined, a long time ago, with Bob Meiser's 10'6" rods and the option of a removable lower grip. Through the seasons and still increasing enormous popularity it morphed into a blanket tossed over any shorter double hand rod. I find it comical that latest and greatest 'Switch' rods are now up to 11'9".. with longer heads being promoted..

    Casting is a personal preference that develops from fishing enviroment, conditions and presentation. I like a line balanced for underhand or overhead, to be clear I'm speaking of smallish - medium sized winter water where 70' is seldom exceeded, and by wading, a fixed distance accurate cast of 50' [ballpark] can be utilised. Certain runs I prefer to fish from the bank with a long overhead shot rather than stir the silt with wading.. less disturbance X2

    There are a couple things that define differences in a switch vs light spey [my opinion only] Physical weight, line class weight, and biggest [to me] grip format.. ultra short upper grips suck.

    Personally I think the Brits nailed it. There are two types of fly rods.. Single hand and Double hand.
     
  3. roxnwater

    roxnwater New Member

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    Thanks for the info, Mumbles. I recently purchased a 4wt 11' TFO DeerCreek switch rod and I'm still playing around with lines. Lately I've been using it on the Yak to swing sculpins. Works better for me on the windy days too.
     
  4. Ed Call

    Ed Call Mumbling Moderator Staff Member

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    Roxnwater, I've got that rod and enjoy tossing sculpins or streamers on the Yakima across seams into soft water along the banks. When the belly of the line catches the main seam and gets that streamer racing downstream it can be pretty fun. If you've not yet tried an Ambush line, you might want to seek one out. I have a 7wt ambush that may be a touch heavy, so a 6 might be perfect, but since I have the 7wt I use it and it send it downrange quite nicely from the bank or beach.
     
  5. yuhina

    yuhina Tropical member

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    Very cool info! Ed. I think this will give people a start point to experiment their new rod...

    Only thing I would add is to be aware of head length when using those switch rods. Sometimes a correct gain window but "improper" length of head will still cause casting problems (depends on which style). This is especially true, to me, when cast Skagit style.
     
  6. diverdown

    diverdown New Member

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    Mark,

    Please don't mind the noob question but what do the 210 and 440 numbers for the Allen 8wt Switch rod represent.

    Thanks
    ~S
     
  7. Luke77

    Luke77 I hope she likes whitefish

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    Line weights in grains. Meaning that 8 wt is best suited for a line between 210 grains and 440 grains.
     
  8. diverdown

    diverdown New Member

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    Thanks very much.
    ~S