sound fishing for coho

Discussion in 'Saltwater' started by dominic7471, Dec 27, 2006.

  1. Porter

    Porter Active Member

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    done.
     
  2. Fishbio

    Fishbio New Member

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    To all interested: Great to hear the resident coho fishing is good.

    I need to know about clipped and unclipped fish numbers. How many did you look at, how many were clipped?

    If you would give me date, numbers and average size that would be great, location also good as well, but understand the sensitive nature of that information. Contact me at work, if that helps. 902-2663

    Roger is correct (of course, I think he knows more about this topic than I do), the fish size is large for this time of year, the next two months will tell the story, if they are going to move north, it will be between now and March. Big fish now mean there should be bait to hold them (hope).
    Keep fishing and keep looking for clips!
    Fisbio
     
  3. dominic7471

    dominic7471 Member

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    okay so suck is the wrong word usage.... lets put it like i dont like popper fishing for coho..... there we go... and to answer that other dudes question, i have heard of the miyawaki popper but it doesnt hook enough fish because of the hook coming off the top... i prefer the puget sound slider when popper fishing
     
  4. Bruce Davidson

    Bruce Davidson formerly hatman

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    FishBio: Will do. Glad to help.
     
  5. Fishbio

    Fishbio New Member

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  6. salt dog

    salt dog card shark

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    Fishbio, I'm not seeing any clipped Coho in the small pods hanging around Snohomish County beaches, but they're healthy, and chunky as well, around 14-15". I'll start keeping tabs if data from that area is helpful to you.
     
  7. snbrundage

    snbrundage Member

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    Salt Dog, et al.

    I was told by a person working in a fly shop that the practice of rearing, clipping, and late releasing coho for the purpose of creating "resident Coho" has not happened for a few years. He further said that if I was catching smallish Coho in the Sound it proved that they had established themselves, on their own, as a non ocean going kind of fish.

    Well now I am very confused.

    sb
     
  8. Fishbio

    Fishbio New Member

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    Jim, I would be glad to get data from farther north. As there are not any major delayed release programs that far north, estimates of residents in that area may mean a good year for resident coho all around (blackmouth as well).
    As you may know, our delayed release program doesn't make all the fish resident, it only increases the percentage of fish that hang around (from a normal of about 5% up to 25-30%).
    Historically, the sound had resident coho supported by wild popualtions, when those began to decline in the late 50's, Frank Haw and others developed the technique of holding fish past their normal migration timing (April-May, until June-July), usually in net pens, but we do some at freshwater sites (Minter).
    We have been making efforts the last 5 years to increase resident coho after they again began to disappear in the late 80s and 90s. I hope those efforts are paying off.
    Good fishing and look for those clipped fish.
    Andy
     
  9. Fishbio

    Fishbio New Member

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    sb, happy to help with some information. See reply to Jim for other info.

    The Squaxin net pens (coop with Squaxin Tribe) has been releasing "delayed" coho since 1976 (June release). Historically we did about 2.7 million, plus 250,000 from Fox Is. net pens (now closed due to budget cuts). Minter ck hatchery also did 250,000 delayed coho (July release). That program was stopped in 1992.

    Currently, we still do 1.8 million from Squaxin Is net pens, (we actually worked to reduce the number because we thought the drop in resident coho in the 90s may be due to a shortage of feed in PS) and brought back the 250,000 at Minter ck hatchery (historically, they were very good producers). Fox Is still closed. (A study to evaluate this was funded by the Puget Sound Recreational Enhancement Group, who get money from license sales).

    The evaluation is why I have been asking folks to let me know what the clipped to unclipped rate is for fish they catch. All hathcery coho in south Puget Sound are clipped (even Nisqually tribal coho). (All WDFW coho statewide are clipped). So if we are still seeing a lot of unclipped residents, we will know that significant wild (or at least naturally spawning coho are contributing)
    Hope that helps,
    Andy
     
  10. SteveA

    SteveA Gnu to the board

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    This thread has piqued my interest. Here's a question from somebody that has never set foot in saltwater with a fly rod. Is there a particular type of beach one would be looking for, or is anyplace I can get a good cast into the water worth trying.

    Also, just in case I decide to give it a shot, will the salt water cause my trout gear any problems? I realize I would give everything a thorough rinse at the end of the day but just want to be sure.

    Thanks...
    Steve A
     
  11. hendersonbaylocal

    hendersonbaylocal Member

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    Steve, see this thread http://washingtonflyfishing.com/board/showthread.php?t=36870. The salt won't hurt your gear, just wash it down.

    Do a search on the site for sea run cutts or resident coho and you will find a ton of information on the type of beaches to look for. From my experience, the residents hang out around points or upwelling areas where the there is alot of circulation. I would hit up Lincoln park for resident chinook - there is another post somewhere about it. It is a good spot with alot of beach.
     
  12. gt

    gt Active Member

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    coho which hang out only do well when there is an available food source. the delayed release program is another disaster perpetrated by WDFW. the ocean was a huge conveyor belt of feed for these fishes and that is why we used to see the coho return in the 10-15# range.

    any of your folks seen coho that size lately??? have you seen the shoals of herring down on the flats in the canal?? have you seen the shoals of herring around cherry point?? didn't think so as 'we' have guaranteed their demise. no feed, no weight, some refer to that as cause and effect.

    a good part of this was started simply because AK, WA, BC and OR could not or would not agree to harvest quotas. so brilliant mind in WA late released coho to screw the BC troll fleet. what has been produced is an inferior product, of minimal size and little market value.

    net pens were also a gleam in the eye of WDFW as a means of increasing harvest at terminal locations, read that river and estuary mouths. as we all have come to realize, net pens lead to all sorts of problems for the zillions of miniature fish that are crammed into such confined spaces. again WDFW, take a bow.

    now they don't know what fish are where??? typical of a mismanaged, philosophically stupid bunch of folks.
     
  13. dominic7471

    dominic7471 Member

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    Steve A- Try some of the more southern beaches like towards the tacoma narrows. Trout gear will be fine.... try some little clousers and shock and awes and always look for jumping fish. Thats about it with the key point being look for jumping fish.. Just give your gear a thorough rinse and you will be good

    Best of luck:thumb:
     
  14. Salmon fisher

    Salmon fisher Member

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    Beaches that have lots of rocks (any size, from pebbles to boulders) work best for me. I have never had great luck over sandy beaches

    Good luck
     
  15. Roger Stephens

    Roger Stephens Active Member

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    GT:

    Andy mentioned in a previous post that there used to be an excellent "wild" resident coho fisheries prior to the 1960's on Puget Sound during winter/spring/summer months. The delayed release "resident" coho program was started by WDFW in the 1970's to revive this popular fisheries. It has provided an outstanding fly fisheries on Puget Sound waters for several decades. These fish normally remain within Puget Sound/Strait of Juan De Fuca. This fisheries is not "another disaster prepetrated by WDFW."

    For the last couple of decades there have been adequate sand lance and anchovy populations in Puget Sound to usually "hold" the delayed release "resident" coho in Puget Sound. Herring are not as an important food source as sand lance, in particular, and anchovies for the delayed release coho. This past fall/winter Puget Sound appears to have a "bumper" crop of sand lance and anchovies.

    "Now they don't understand what fish are where??? Typical of a mismanaged, philosophically, stupid bunch of folks." Pretty harsh words without having knowledge or understanding of the delayed release coho fisheries program.

    Roger