Sous Vide. Anyone use it?

Discussion in 'Camping, Hiking, Cooking' started by Trapper, Jan 11, 2018.

  1. 2506

    2506 Active Member

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    FYI, replacing the ham with crab makes Eggs Neptune for those of you scoring at home. I have no idea what you would call the dish with chorizo. The French don't really like the Mexicans, so I doubt they'd even consider chorizo in a dish, let alone name it.
     
  2. napawino

    napawino Banned or Parked

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    Jesus. How did we ever get this far? This is the silliest nonsensical cooking gadgetry bullshit. How did we ever cook our food before?

    A lady I know got all into this system. I don't get it. I can cook food just fine on a grill, frying pan, dutch oven, deep fryer and microwave. This is pure trendy nonsense, intended to fool people into buying more stuff. P.T. Barnum is smiling.
     
  3. Trapper

    Trapper Author, Writer, Photographer

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    We cooked it in water; corned beef and cabbage.

    The only difference is this method keeps all the flavor in the food.
     
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  4. dld

    dld Active Member

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    Philistine. Go back to your threads about grown men chasing and rolling around on the ground with each other.
     
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  5. napawino

    napawino Banned or Parked

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    But if you do a steak, you still have to brown it, or it looks like gray flannel. I guess to each his own. I grill year round, and I don't see how this boil in a bag stuff can possibly improve on good old bbq.
     
  6. napawino

    napawino Banned or Parked

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    You have no other interests, I guess. Just fishing and boiling food in a bag. Carry on. And who calls anyone a philistine? What are you, 145 years old?
     
  7. Trapper

    Trapper Author, Writer, Photographer

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    You may be 100% correct. I’ve spent the last 67 years challenging my assumptions. Sometimes I keep the old ways. Sometimes I evolve.
     
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  8. dld

    dld Active Member

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    Here's the thing: When you grill a medium-rare steak, it has a gray band around the edge, right?

    With sous vide, you have a single, uniform color, edge-to-edge. You also have a long time during which the texture of the meat/veggie doesn't change.

    No, you don't want to eat the steak without searing it, as much for the added flavor as for the disgusting appearance.

    If you haven't ever tried it, why are you so sure that it isn't better?
     
  9. napawino

    napawino Banned or Parked

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    As stated above, I have a friend who bought into it. A neighbor. I have had food prepared that way. It's good. But so is many other ways of cooking. It just seems trendy and while not without merit, just a lot of hoopla. I would imagine this system being really popular with city dwellers, like in high rise condos, who do not have access to grilling. To me, the best of the steak is the outside where it has been seared mixed with some of the pink part. I didn't really mean to insult your way of cooking, but like someone said in another topic, the wheel has already been invented.
     
  10. ribka

    ribka Active Member

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    Ive done sous vide for about 15 years and yes it does cook some foods well and texture can be improved for tougher cuts of meat.

    I stopped using because of cooking food in a plastic bag in heat for long periods of time and had concerns of leeching chemicals into the food. But I also try to minimize use of plastics in food storage, prep and cooking. And its not just the bpa's in plastics that are harmful.

    I just cook meat low and slow and finish off with high temps if needed

    I may just be paranoid though
     
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  11. dld

    dld Active Member

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    A perfectly reasonable response, maybe lead with that next time instead of saying that anyone who likes/uses something is a rube.

    I cook many different ways. Sous vide happens to be what I use for certain things.

    It's also great for cooking on hot summer days of I don't want to grill and don't want my house heating up.
     
  12. napawino

    napawino Banned or Parked

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    Rube? Who did I call a rube? I like that one though. How colloquial. :)
     
  13. Mark Walker

    Mark Walker Active Member

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  14. jwg

    jwg Active Member

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    I did not know about this cooking method and wondered about food safety.

    I came up with the following review.
    http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1878450X11000035?via=ihub

    There is a ton of information about how this method works with various types of food, before it gets to the section on food safety.

    J

    it says:
    You were probably taught that there is a ‘‘danger zone’’ between 4.4 1C/40 1F and 60 1C/140 1F. These tempera- tures are not quite right: it is well known that food pathogens can only multiply between 1.3 1C/29.7 1F and 52.3 1C/126.1 1F, while spoilage bacteria begin multi- plying at 5 1C/23 1F (Snyder, 2006; Juneja et al., 1999; FDA, 2011). Johnson et al. (1983) reported that Bacillus cereus could multiply at 55 1C/131 1F, but no one else has demonstrated growth at this temperature and so Clostri- dium perfringens is used instead. Moreover, contrary to popular belief, food pathogens and toxins cannot be seen, smelt or tasted.

    So why were you taught that food pathogens do not multiply below 4.4 1C/40 1F and grow all the way up to 60 1C/140 1F? Because it takes days for food pathogens to grow to a dangerous level at 4.4 1C/40 1F (FDA, 2011) and it takes many hours for food to be made safe at just above 52.3 1C/126.1 1F—compared with only about 12 min (for meat) (FDA, 2009, 3-401.11.B.2) and 35 min (for poultry) (FSIS, 2005) to be made safe (for immuno-compromised people) when the coldest part is at 60 1C/140 1F. Indeed, the food pathogens that can multiply down to 1.3 1C/29.71F – Yersinia enterocolitica and Listeria monocytogenes – can only multiply about once per day at 4.4 1C/40 1F and so you can hold food below 4.4 1C/40 1F for 5–7 days (FDA, 2011). At 52.3 1C/126.1 1F, when the common food pathogen C. perfringens stops multiplying, it takes a very long time to reduce the food pathogens we are worried about – namely the Salmonella species, L. monocytogenes, and the patho- genic strains of Escherichia coli – to a safe level; in a 54.4 1C/ 130 1F water bath (the lowest temperature usually recom- mend for cooking sous vide) it will take you about 212 h to reduce E. coli to a safe level in a 25 mm/1 in. thick hamburger patty and holding a hamburger patty at 54.4 1C/ 130 1F for 212 h is inconceivable with traditional cooking methods—which is why the ‘‘danger zone’’ conceived for traditional cooking methods does not start at 54.4 1C/130 1F but at 60 1C/140 1F.
     

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  15. Trapper

    Trapper Author, Writer, Photographer

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    jwg. Thanks for that and information. It took me a while to get through it, but well worth the read.
     
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