South Sound Cutts

Discussion in 'Saltwater' started by pez, Feb 12, 2005.

  1. Ron Eagle Elk

    Ron Eagle Elk Active Member

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    Love the Sea Run Cutts, but have never fished the salt for them. Once I recover from this whooping cough thing, I'd love to get out. Drop me a PM, I'm retired so I fish whenever I can.

    REE
     
  2. dmoocher

    dmoocher Member

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    Just ordered my pontoon on-line...all I could afford was the ODC 915...but it should work for me. Wanted to get it to hook up with Mr. Mill Creek down here who seems to have Hamersly Inlet pretty well nailed. There are a couple areas off Fox Is I have fished before from larger boats that would be perfect for a beach launched 'toon.

    Florian, Jason was bidding on the Scadden on e-bay...he lost it with 6 seconds to go.
     
  3. tomc

    tomc Member

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    Cool, When do you expect your pontoon boat? And don't worry about the "fashion police" bad mouthing Creek Company boats, I get a lot of access to places that I would otherwise never see because of my boats, and they work great. So, LET'S GO.
    Tom
     
  4. dmoocher

    dmoocher Member

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    Will do...I've got friends with beach access on both sides of Steamboat Island (Totten/Eld) so there is plenty to explore.
     
  5. yellerstone

    yellerstone Guest

    Tom, Dave, Todd, and any other Sound Sounders or anybody who cares.

    I'm trying to solve a mystery as to why the cutthroat fishing has been hot on one tide exchange then dead on the next. Bear with me while I give you some background.

    On Saturady I fished the evergreen beach during the last of the incoming tide during a slow exchange. In the past I have found that it almost always fishes better on the fastest part of the out tide. I fished from about noon to 4:00 pm. the fish were in very close and very active. In the first hour and a half I landed eight lost as many and had a lot of follows and boils to a fly fished just under the surface. i was surprised that it was so good during the incoming but oh wee what are you doing to do? During the fist part of the high slack I caught a few more. the it went absolutly dead, no strikes or jumpers.

    I returned on Sunday at about 1:00pm with my partner and meet PEZ (aka Todd). Two other flyfishers had been there all morning a did very well. Apparently we were a little late on the tide as it was abosolutly dead, nobody had a strike. we fished the very last of the incoming and trough the high slack and the first of the out tide. My partner and I left about 3:30 and Todd stayed late and repoted no activity at all. I kinda felt like a schumck when we zeroed out after telling tales of a hot time, so much for my credability.

    The funny thing is that I sure the fish were still around and had not moved off, they were just done feeding. But why? I had the same experience in January, this difference being that during the daylight hours we had heavy fog on the water but clear skys and a full moon during the night.

    So here is my theory (not that I know anything). Years ago I remember hearing that chinook fishing could be slow during the daylight hours following a full moon because the phyto plantkon, attrached by the moonlight, moved to the surface, then in turn the zooplankton followed to feed on the phytoplankton and the fish followed to feed heavily on the zooplanton. and then the fish bacically rested during the daylight hours. Makes sense to me.

    So here is the question? why were the fish still feeding during the late morning and mid-day? Were they still in the feeding mode? and why were they feeding during tidal cycles that were opposite from what my experince has show to the norm? Slow incoming as opposed to a fast out tide and time of day, and angle of sun has really never made much difference.

    One more thing, as I was leaving I noticed a large number of fry, that I think were chum at the estuary of a very tiny stream in about six inches of water. There were quite few chum carcasses on the beach in January near the stream. It blows me away to think that chum use this stream as it is only about three feet wide at high flows, but now I'm sure they do. So how do the chum fry fit into the picture? There was no cutthroat activity near the stream, but we were fish a shallow cove about 500 yards away. Could the incomig be collecting other fry in the cove? If so, why would the cutthroat stop feeding during the high slack?

    What do you think? Now that I got that off my chest I can get back to work.

    John
     
  6. salt dog

    salt dog card shark

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    John, when I first started SRC ff a couple of years ago, the initial advice I received was: 1) always fish on the incoming tide, 2) always fish on the outgoing tide, 3) only the middle two hours of a fast tide, 4) the two hours before and after a peak tide. Well, that set me straight. :beathead:

    Further research, including Les Johnson's book, gave me a clue as to why the disparate advice: each beach seems to have a distinct tide phase it fishes best; explore and learn.

    From what I can tell, a good part of it has to do with the currents formed from a moving tide on the underwater structure, and how that impacts the presentment of bait fish to predator fish. But I have certainly experienced the hot yesterday / nothing today from SRC on the same beach, as they simply move around a lot. It seems to be the nature of the SRC fishing that you search a beach for a riser, a follower, a boil or a hit, or otherwise move on to another beach.

    I agree, there seems to be a factor involved with the low light / zooplankton cycle, as well as other factors (barometer drop, moon phase, etc.), but I never heard of anyone that has that figured out beyond an interesting point of discussion while the fishing was slow, or over beers. Every time you think you see a pattern, the exceptions destroy any correlation you try to make.

    In the final analysis, I have adopted the often heard mantra: "the best time to fish is when you can". I have had some of my best days fishing SRC when I went to the beach because I needed the time out, and everything was running against all of the tendencies I thought I had figured out, and stumbled into an incredible day of fishing. I do believe the elusiveness of SRC is part of what make them so captivating a quarry.

    I would hope to one day have a better understanding of it all than just the Zen-like, "it is what it is". Now that I've shared my un-enlightened position thoroughly, I can go back to work and maybe someone with lengthy experience can shed some light.
     
  7. tomc

    tomc Member

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    Well... It is my experience that the cutts fish better on a fast tides because the fast moving water concentrates the bait-fish. In Hamersley the fast tide in the spring and summer are during the daytime. It turns out, that some of the best fishing grounds are exposed during an out-going tide In Hamersley. Another thing to think of is the nature of a narrow inlet that on different tides (flood or ebb) the eddys will be in different areas of the inlet on different tides. I look at the water in Hamersley similar to a river that flows two directions. I fish the incoming tide in different places than I fish the outgoing tide.
    As a matter of fact this coming Saturday we will have the first decent tide in the afternoon. Low tide in Shelton will be around 2:30 PM with an eleven foot drop. If you guys want to launch from my place at noon or so, we can fish the bottom of the tide and be back at the house around 4PM plus or minus. We would fish from the Libby Point area to Cape Horn and back. Give it some thought, and let me know what you guys want to do, but I'll be fishing that tide for sure, and your company is welcome.
    tom
    and John, if your boat doesn't arrive by the weekend you can borrow something in the shop that floats.
     
  8. pez

    pez "Say, nice bead head earring"

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    John,
    That certainly is an interesting theory. I have to say I don't know much about plankton habits but it does make me wonder :hmmm: . Certainly I stop eating if I'm full. I have looking at an older book "Fly fishing estauries" and it has similar advice to what Salt Dog said. I guess I'll just have to keep trying to figure it out.

    Tomc, I'll get back to you about this weekend. May have to load up the pontoon boat and head your way. I'll PM you if I can.

    John, no worries on not catching fish Sunday. It was just nice to share the beach with like minded folks and pick up a few pointers. Next time might be gang busters.

    Todd