Spey quivers

Discussion in 'Spey Clave' started by MNguyendc, Nov 8, 2017.

  1. MNguyendc

    MNguyendc Member

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    For someone starting Spey, what do you recommend people start out with and progress to? Fishing PNW rivers. What would be a first, then second rod and application?

    For example, usually I think most people would agree for trout, a 9' 5 weight that will cover most of trout fishing then digress from there.

    Just curious to get my brain thinking before I commit to one.

    Thanks all!
     
  2. spfd jason

    spfd jason Active Member

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    A 13' seven weight is the standard all around spey rod. Then I got a 8 wt switch. Then a 6 wt spey. Then a 7 wt switch. Then an 8 wt spey. Wash, rinse, repeat. :)
     
  3. jake-e-boy

    jake-e-boy sans caféine

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    First was 7126, second 51008, then 8126, next 9141, then 6120, 8136, 4110, 6126, 8110, 9140, 6126, 8119....

    I has narrowed the above down to 7 and can cover everything I want in wa/or/id
     
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  4. Nooksack Mac

    Nooksack Mac Active Member

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    The 13 foot 7-weight is the standard for good reason, and you'd probably use one a lot over the years. However, your first choice may depend on what your home rivers are like. For me, since the nearest spey-fishable streams are either big or huge, I started with a 14 foot 9/10, then progressed to 15' and 16 footers, before beginning to regress to shorter ones.
     
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  5. Chawhee

    Chawhee Active Member

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    What's the price range you are looking at?
     
  6. MNguyendc

    MNguyendc Member

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    200-400 for my first
     
  7. Tom McCoy

    Tom McCoy New Member

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    For $200-$400 you should be able to get a really nice use rod or a good serviceable new stick. I think we're all under the assumption that you are looking for a steelhead rod and not trout, chinook, etc. If you are going to keep the number of sticks to a minimum but fish a wide variety of rivers then the above advice is just right, 13' 7wt is the best place to start then build out from there. That's exactly where I started, but, I just looked back at the tubes leaning against the wall and off the top of my head there are at least 11 rods and probably a few I've forgotten about. They come and go like the tide. What I've found is that as I got more specialized rods (e.g. 11' 6/7wt up to 16' 10wt) I used my 13' 7wt less and less. In fact, a 13' 7wt has been my least used rod over the past few years! (in fact I went over a year without fishing it) However, after bringing 7 rods for a 4 day float on the Deschutes last year (and trying to keep 4 strung at all times) I find myself coming back full circle to just make it all simpler.

    This spring I got to work with a prototype Bruce and Walker 13' 6/7 Powerlite. After the testing conclued I couldn't help but comment to Gene Oswald that this rod is the perfect universal solvent for summer steelhead in the PNW. It is not perfect for every situation (e.g. big runs on the Clearwater) but is still a good answer to just about any question. I got one of the first 3 built and with a couple of carefully selected lines I will be able to do at least a credible job on just about any steelhead situation I might stumble into.

    Have fun with it and if you get a chance go to the Sandy Spey Clave. It will be worth your time in trying to get everything figured out.

    TMc
     
  8. Richard E

    Richard E Active Member

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    Best spey starting out, for PNW rivers? A middle length 7 or 8 weight, like one of my two TFO spey rods I have for sale:

    TFO Signature 12'6" 8 weight spey, new in tube, $130

    TFO Deer Creek 13'0" 7/8 spey, very good to excellent, in tube, $200
     
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  9. Rob Allen

    Rob Allen Active Member

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    I think the first rod should be a rod capable of a 540-570 skagit. Or 480-500 scandi. This is your basic do everything rod. 13 is a good length.
    To be perfectly honest this is almost never overkill. The need for rods lighter than this really doesn't exist.

    Next rod after this should be a big river rod a 14 ish rod for a 9 wt. These rods will be popular again when the skagit reopens.

    After that a toy spey might be fun for dry line work.. a 12'6" 6 or 7 strictly for sumners.

    Then the last rod you need is a short spey rod 11-12 foot for an 8 or 9 for fishing coho and chums..

    Anything beyond this is money better spent on traveling.
     
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  10. Chawhee

    Chawhee Active Member

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    Find a new or used Echo Dec Hogan II. Fuller flexing than what you will find from most other rods in that price range. Only problem is that the tip has too slow of recovery, even when compared to the rest of the rod.

    However I will say, that because it is a fuller flexing rod and slower action, you would learn to cast proficiently much much faster. Reason? Because it allows you to pay attention to each step of the cast. The rod bends into the handle (which gives you the caster feedback) which again, let's you pay attention to what's going on with rod in regards to loading and unloading.

    Lastly, you CANNOT go wrong with Echo customer service. Break it? They send you a new rod for the repair fee, in my experience at least.
     
    Last edited: Nov 9, 2017
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  11. skyrise

    skyrise Active Member

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    Would you guys still prefer a 13/7wt for canyon water winter/summer? And are OPST heads better for newer guys than Airflo or Rio? Cause they sure make them look better in the videos they put out.
     
  12. Rob Allen

    Rob Allen Active Member

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    For getting into the sport i recomnend airflo compacts skagits and scandis they are plenty short enough for even the shortest 2 handed rods
     
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  13. bk paige

    bk paige Wishin I was on the Sauk

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    That TFO 13' 7/8 deer creek is an amazing stick and will do it all for you and at 200 it's a good deal.
     
  14. Parera

    Parera Member

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    The Dually 7130 is really nice and i bet you can find it for under 200
     
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  15. Put

    Put New Member

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    Another reasonable rod series to consider are the Redington Chromer series. I have not personally cast them, but a guide friend of mine really likes his seven weight, says it is a great rod for the money. They come in 12'6" and 13'6" models in both 7 and 8 weights. $400 new, but you can probably try to find one used. There were two for sale on the other site, but both sold. Good luck!
     
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