SRC Newbie - would a Sage ONE 691 be an OK choice?

Discussion in 'Saltwater' started by Brian White, Apr 23, 2012.

  1. Brian White

    Brian White Recovering Bugmeister

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    Not trying to spin up a "which rod is best" thread; just seeking feedback on whether a Sage ONE 9' 6 wt would be a reasonable choice for light salt applications like SRC. I get very good prices on Sage products thanks to a biz relationship and am really hoping to try fly fishing salt this year. I also have birthday clearance for another rod...

    I was born on and grew up in the ocean - but my saltwater fly fishing experience is effectively zilch. I have done a fair amount of saltwater gear fishing, but mostly for bigger fish (think chucking a big piece of skipjack for wahoo, or fishing for marlin) and not over the last few years since becoming largely landlocked.

    On a related note, could I just use a 690 (freshwater seat), or am I much better off with the 691 setup?
     
  2. David Loy

    David Loy Senior Moment

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    Is this a trick question?
    Yes, it would be an excellent choice. If I were in the market for a new uber Puget Sound rod, the short list would be the 691 ONE and the comparable SW version Loomis NRX. You might try the GLX too. Some of the best of the best around here like it as well. Maybe try the Sage VXP for grins.
    You might consider switch rods up front rather than later, maybe wishing you had. Some folks like them a lot.
    I would opt for the SW safe rod and use it in FW too. I doubt you spend much time admiring your wood reel seat while you're out fishing.
     
  3. DimeBrite

    DimeBrite MA-9 Beach Stalker

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    If you enjoy casting the Sage ONE, then buy it. Get the saltwater reel seat version. Because it's a lighter rod you may want to consider your reel/backing/line weight so it is well balanced for a long day of casting. I'm liking my 9'6" 8weight Sage ONE so far. It's like casting a 6 weight, but retains power. It matches nicely with my well worn Bauer Superlite reel.
     
  4. NewTyer1

    NewTyer1 Banned or Parked

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    I have been told and have seen that most SW fishers prefer a 9' 8/9wt. I feel and this is only my opinion that a 6wt might be a little light because you never know what you are going to hook up with and you want the outfit to withstand that. Just my $.2
     
  5. Stonefish

    Stonefish Triploid, Humpy & Seaplane Hater

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    That would be a great all around beach stick for SRC's and coho. I agree with DimeBrite, I'd look at the 697-4.
     
  6. Preston

    Preston Active Member

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    For most Puget Sound applications an 8/9 weight would be serious overkill. I don't know where you're getting your information, but most beach anglers prefer a 6-weight for their cutthroat and resident coho fishing. Even returning mature coho can easily be handled on a 6-weight and I've caught blackmouth to over nine pounds without really breaking a sweat.
     
    Nick Clayton likes this.
  7. dryflylarry

    dryflylarry "Chasing Riseforms"

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    I just picked up a Sage One today, but did not cast it. It was a 6 wt. and felt like a broomstick. If you like fast broomsticks, then that's for you. I don't think I could feel a sea run cutthroat on it it felt so stiff. A 5 wt. is ideal for cutthroat with a med. fast action in my opinion. Perhaps a "tad" faster action would be ok.
     
  8. Nick Clayton

    Nick Clayton Active Member

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    Eh, it would be OK. Serviceable, if you could stand encountering other anglers with such a lowly rod in hand.

    Never had any need to go higher than a 6 wt for my beach fishing. Never fished chum where I would prefer to throw something with a bit more authority.
     
  9. chrome/22

    chrome/22 For him there whould always be the riddle of steel

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    Shot some line w/ that Sage ONE 6 wt. the 9' 6" saltwater-version. My SA 250 grain streamer express went across the parking lot & up & over some dudes pick up.

    Yeah it will do.


    c/22
     
  10. DimeBrite

    DimeBrite MA-9 Beach Stalker

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    I've seen Stonefish catch/hook salmon (in person and in photos) more than worthy of an 8 weight. Of course a 6 weight is the way to go for cutthroat, resident coho, and immature blackmouth. I personally carry both a 6 wt and an 8wt to the beach from August-November. You never know.
     
  11. Go Fish

    Go Fish Language, its a virus

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    Some good advice from the guys that
    are in the trenches. I like a six weight
    but am looking forward to trying
    DB's Sage One if he will let me do
    my shitty casting with it.

    Dave
     
  12. Don Freeman

    Don Freeman Free Man

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    I got the 9'6" model for a six weight especially for beach fishing. The extra 1/2 foot will help keep your back cast off the beach. It's truly excellent for cutts, dry fly larry, if you have any trouble feeling the fish, I'd see your doctor. It's very sensitive.

    I've also landed 15# chum and steelhead up to around 12 with it, and was quite happy with the lifting power as well as the casting distance and accuracy. I cast the 9' 6wt with an Outbound Short at PSFly Co today, and while it was very nice, but for beach application, I'd get the 9'6" again.
     
  13. dryflylarry

    dryflylarry "Chasing Riseforms"

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    I guess I'll go see my doctor after 50 years of fly fishing ... :D
     
  14. David Loy

    David Loy Senior Moment

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    Generally I am a fan of rods in the 8.5' to 9' range as I find them more fun to cast and more accurate than long rods. As others have said, extra length on the beach is valuable, and accuracy isn't as crucial as in the classic spring creek or pocket water type situation. Another thing to keep in mind is that any SW rod will have a short fighting butt which effectively shortens the rod by 2 or 3 inches and probably the alters swing weight a bit too. A small difference maybe but something to consider. Also, that fighting butt helps keep your reel out of the sand while taking a break.
     
  15. Brian White

    Brian White Recovering Bugmeister

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    Thanks all for the advice! I am excited about fly fishing in salt. I will try the 9'6" 6 wt rod side by side with the 9' rod before I decide which way to go. Lots of great rods with a variety of actions out there, but I'm kind of locked in on Sages for this particular rod for reasons outlined in my first post. Also I will probably stay with 6 wt - versatile for me.