Steelhead Hatchery Programs Violate ESA

Discussion in 'Steelhead' started by Andrew Lawrence, Jan 24, 2014.

  1. TallFlyGuy

    TallFlyGuy Adipossessed!

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    Almost all hatcheries need to be closed or soon will be closed based on their return rates. Retard hatchery fish are coming back fewer and fewer. The current/old plan...Just plant more and more to make up for it. Now I believe the average return rate is getting less and less. So what do the idiots at WDFW and ODFW do??? They go after natives for brood stock.

    If Broodstock is the answer....Then they are openly admitting their hatchery programs have failed! Magically, if they raise smolts from wild parents the return rate jumps through the roof. Gee how does that happen?
     
  2. Chris Bellows

    Chris Bellows Your Preferred WFF Poster

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    i've always felt like broodstocking should be a last resort like with hood canal summer chum. unfortunately the vast majority of steelhead brood stocking plans are harvest based which means they don't have an end date.... besides forever.

    plus, imo in most of our watersheds containing wild winter steelhead, wild fish are too valuable to be removed from the spawning population and turned into harvestable fish for the sportfishing industry. it is hubris to think that taking a wild fish out of a wild river and putting it in a concrete tank will improve the fishing experience or wild run size.

    broodstock hatchery plans for winter steelhead are almost exclusively promoted by guides, which makes me instantly skeptical of the reasoning. they are typically just another way of holding onto the failed hatchery mindset. there is no secret hatchery method that will magically save our wild fish, and no amount of praying or old ideas will make hatcheries into a solution.

    brood stock is for emergencies, because all it will do over time will be to move the entire wild population into the hatchery... plus we certainly do not need any more harvest pressure on wild fish as brood stock fish will have basically the same return timing as wild fish.
     
  3. Chris Johnson

    Chris Johnson Member: Native Fish Society

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  4. TallFlyGuy

    TallFlyGuy Adipossessed!

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    Agreed! A Broodstock program is nothing more than raping wild ESA listed fish and wasting their offspring to fill the freezers of fishermen. ODFW has found out when they mix wild fish and grow their offspring in hatcheries, their survival rates double to triple. Now they have to try and communicate (blatantly lie) to the public that broodstock programs are the answer all our prayers. Why you say? Because hatcheries are failing miserably! Wait, isn't this what they told us about hatcheries way back when?
     
  5. JesseC

    JesseC Active Member

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  6. HauntedByWaters

    HauntedByWaters Active Member

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    I suggest you guys learn about the brood stock program on the Vedder. It is very tightly regulated and works well. It isn't like they simply mine the wild fish, spawn them, and raise them in the same system we use for Chambers fish.

    Fish are spawned on a pairing basis: one buck per one hen. Each pair is taken from a specific reach of the river by a sports angler and spawned. The juveniles are raised in many different locals, river side ponds, hatchery ponds to create as much diversity as possible. And most importantly they are raised in low density while in containment which means less disease and more autonomy. These smaller scale brood stock programs have much higher success rates per numbers released so you can release fewer juveniles and get better returns unlike our hatchery system.

    I am not all for brood stock. I am just saying that there are much MUCH better ways of doing hatchery fish than we do now. We raise fish for harvest, not to supplement wild populations. There is a difference.

    I foresee a day when we could have our c&r seasons back and have a chance at a 20# hatchery fish, albeit a remote one. How about a hatchery fish that doesn't return directly to the hatchery, is aggressive, but is a minuscule portion of the wild population? By minuscule I mean hardly any, but enough to keep our rivers open. Unfortunately, this will never happen in WA.
     
  7. Chris Bellows

    Chris Bellows Your Preferred WFF Poster

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    sure would like to read more than the abstract, but cannot afford full access to the mentioned study.

    i hope the irrigator's study is accurate compared to the tribal study on hatchery chinook that was touted all over the web but was full of holes upon further review.
     
  8. TallFlyGuy

    TallFlyGuy Adipossessed!

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    A lot of suspicious politics are involved with that article. Find it very interesting that it is being cited and put on a "news bulletin" on the eve of hatchery elimination on certain streams in Washington. Here are a few more studies that one might consider in coming to their own conclusion on how wild and hatchery fish interact to help or hinder the health of wild populations.


    Ecological interactions between wild and hatchery salmonids: an introduction to the special issue

    Mechanisms influencing competition between hatchery and wild juvenile anadromous Pacific salmonids in fresh water and their relative competitive abilities

    Predation by hatchery yearling salmonids on wild subyearling salmonids in the freshwater environment: A review of studies, two case histories, and implications for management

    Risk management of non-target fish taxa in the Yakima River Watershed associated with hatchery salmon supplementation

    Ecological risk assessment of multiple hatchery programs in the upper Columbia watershed using Delphi and modeling approaches

    Lack of trophic competition among wild and hatchery juvenile chum salmon during early marine residence in Taku Inlet, Southeast Alaska

    Spatial and trophic overlap of marked and unmarked Columbia River Basin spring Chinook salmon during early marine residence with implications for competition between hatchery and naturally produced fish

    Wild chinook salmon survive better than hatchery salmon in a period of poor production

    Evidence for competition at sea between Norton Sound chum salmon and Asian hatchery chum salmon

    Perspectives on wild and hatchery salmon interactions at sea, potential climate effects on Japanese chum salmon, and the need for sustainable salmon fishery management reform in Japan

    Wild and hatchery reproduction of pink and chum salmon and their catches in the Sakhalin-Kuril region, Russia

    Some consequences of Pacific salmon hatchery production in Kamchatka: changes in age structure and contributions to natural spawning populations

    Breeding success of four male life history types of spring Chinook Salmon spawning in an artificial stream

    Rapid expansion of an enhanced stock of chum salmon and its impacts on wild population components

    Genetic differentiation between collections of hatchery and wild masu salmon (Oncorhynchus masou) inferred from mitochondrial and microsatellite DNA analyses

    Overview of salmon stock enhancement in southeast Alaska and compatibility with maintenance of hatchery and wild stocks

    Strategies for reducing the ecological risks of hatchery programs: Case studies from the Pacific Northwest

    An overview of salmon enhancement and the need to manage and monitor natural spawning in Hokkaido, Japan

    Understanding the adaptive consequences of hatchery-wild interactions in Alaska salmon

    Ecological interactions between wild and hatchery salmonids and key recommendations for research and management actions in selected regions of the North Pacific
     
    Andrew Lawrence and Jason Rolfe like this.
  9. Bob Triggs

    Bob Triggs Stop Killing Wild Steelhead!

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    I'm giving this a bump up in light of recent reposting of this issue.