Steelhead season observations

#32
I blaim that fat fu*kin' sea lion at the mouth of the river fer the steelheads bad return. He gave me the hairy eyeball once and flipped him the finger and than he went under an I ain't seenem since but I know he eatin' all the 'head round here and making a mess of all the good catchin we should be havin'

*rolls up sleeve wipes beer from chin*

Now who wants to fight about it!?!
 

chadk

Be the guide...
#33
You guys over analyze way too much. I go fishing to let my mind relax and enjoy getting away from work and traffic and trying to solve the worlds problems and fighting with everyone and trying to get that promotion etc etc. Sounds like some of you need to find some new home water if you are finding your fishing time sounds more like a typical work day....

Some years the runs are good, some not so much. Just hit it and enjoy the hand your delt!
 
W

Will Atlas

Guest
#34
the middle drift is always a zoo, cause alot of people dont spend the time to learn the rest of the watershed. not that I mind...I agree with you Rob, the fish for the most part just werent there. I know some very skilled anglers who didn't even get a fish on the Sky this year. Its a bummer to be fishing over such tiny runs, for us and for the fish. Bottom line is we need to do whatever we can to allow our wild steelhead to recover, because as anyone who's caught a wild puget sound steelhead knows they're some epic fish. in my opinion the finest freshwater sport fish on the planet. At least on the Skagit, when you get skunked you spent the day on a river in the middle of the north cascades. That isn't too bad on its own.

Will
 

PT

Physhicist
#35
Chad, the title of the thread is steelhead observations. While some may rant about pressure or lack of fish it's a better topic than which 5 wt should I buy.

If you like to fish for the shear joy in experiencing the outdoors and showing your kids all what nature has to offer then that's pretty cool.

At the end of a steelhead season it doesn't hurt to compare notes. Plus, it gives our coach one more chance to chime in from the top of the mountain.
 

Salmo_g

Well-Known Member
#38
When it comes to catch, the past year is my lowest ever, not counting a few steelhead hooked in BC last summer. Didn't fish much for the hatchery winter run due to poor water conditions when I could get out. The weird thing is that I fished more days this past year while catching far less. I attribute some of that to luck of the draw, but the poor showing of fish had to have something to do with it. I could always increase the odds by fishing at hatchery blood holes, but I didn't want to catch one that badly. I can't say that fishing pressure had much to do with my lack of catch since I try to plan my fishing to avoid a lot of the pressure.

Sg
 

James Mello

Inventor of the "closed eye conjecture"
#39
You guys over analyze way too much. I go fishing to let my mind relax and enjoy getting away from work and traffic and trying to solve the worlds problems and fighting with everyone and trying to get that promotion etc etc. Sounds like some of you need to find some new home water if you are finding your fishing time sounds more like a typical work day....

Some years the runs are good, some not so much. Just hit it and enjoy the hand your delt!
Wow, I wished we could all be like you Chad and fish the uncrowded waters of the Sky..... I know it can be uncrowded, but you need to be there at the right time and place. And considering my location in Tacoma, that pretty much percludes me to getting there at the right times and forcing me to weekends.

Some of this discussion is genuine concern over pressure on the water. Some of it is griping over missed opportunity and expections, while some of it is internal pressure to perform. Fishing means different things to different people, and providing the "wizened" advice you have has done nothing to help this conversation.

For me, I know that I had a pretty bad year, and that in some cases fishing for steelhead this year *was* stressful. Why? Because I have expectations of myself that weren't fullfilled (that weren't in any way related to catching fish). The goals weren't all that bad either, but they were things that I was hoping to accomplish, and in my mind should have. Stupid? Maybe, but to simply wisk away the concept that I *shouldn't* have expectations in my fishing is to assume I want to be like you Chad....

In some ways simply wandering out to the river with no predispositions would be nice (and I do that at times). But not setting goals and not striving for *improvement* would make fishing in my mind much more boring and less fullfilling in the long run. To each his own I guess.

-- Cheers
-- James
 

chadk

Be the guide...
#40
Thanks for your contribution James.

Everyone like me? Keep working on it - but don't set your expectations so high.... ;)
 

Charles Sullivan

ignoring Rob Allen and Generic
#42
I completely agree with James as far as striving for improvement goes.

My goals are not entirely based on more fish to hand.

For example, one goal that I have made is to be able to fish for steelhead enough to keep myself happy while minimizing the effect on the wife and kids. I was fairly succesful, although the April closure surely helped.

Another goal was to find walk in access to a few stretches of river. Again I was fairly succesful. So although I have not caught as many fish this year I hope to have laid the groundwork for future success by learning strategies to be more efficient. I may have a few different non-number related goals next year.

Sox lose 6-3,
cds
 

Snake

tryin' not to get too comfortable
#43
I completely agree with James as far as striving for improvement goes.

My goals are not entirely based on fish to hand.
iagree:thumb:

I enjoy every day away from the city, whether I catch fish, or not.

One of my goals this season was to take a newbie floating/fishing on the Skagit, and raise money for the not-for-profit I work for:

http://www.washingtonflyfishing.com/board/showthread.php?t=38258&highlight=ethical

The winning bid was placed by a good guy, who appreciated the experience of floating the Skagit in the winter, the eagles, and scenery, and river time. He didn't care about not hooking steel, because that wasn't what he was ultimately there for.

Beginner's mind. Zen mind.

It allowed me to re-assess my own goals, and appreciate it, too.

The best part of life is right under your own nose. Just gotta get the perspective necessary to sniff it out.

I also wanted to get better at basic survival skills. I trimmed my daypack down to the essentials, and practiced making shelters and starting fires in heavy wet conditions when the rivers were blown. Mostly a good excuse to just get out, but educational, nonetheless, and fulfilling, in a weird kind of way.

Learning something new, or exploring a new place, is never a waste of time, IMHO. :ray1:

There's just so much to do and experience, that defining your worth and time by catch ratios seems silly, in the big run.

God, i love this world.
 

chadk

Be the guide...
#45
Never said anything about just relaxing and not setting goals. Just noting how several guys stress out, argue, whine, compete, and take things way too seriously at times. I fish to get away from all that and was only suggesting that if some find fishing just as, or more stressful than dealing with traffic and crowds and stressing out at work, than maybe they should take a look at why they fish in the first place.

I'm lucky enough to fish near a few decent steelhead rivers and have a flexible schedule to hit them when they are prime - for a few hours at least. My hours per fish was pretty good this year and I can only think of 2 times I shared a run for a few minutes with anyone else who came in after me. But that is the joy of fishing week days and knowing where the less pressured spots are that hold fish.