Swich Rod for Trout in Montana's big Rivers

Discussion in 'Spey Clave' started by Switch MT, May 4, 2011.

  1. hookedonthefly

    hookedonthefly Active Member

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    The problem with lining a spey/switch rod over the internet or via shop, manufacturer's or manufacturer's rep recommendation is it's just that...a recommendation or more appropriately a starting point. 30 grains can make a BIG difference.

    In my opinion, when lined appropriately, the two-handed rod should feel intuitive and effortless to cast. It should make you smile :D .

    You can spend a ton of money on lines that don't work well for your rod or your casting style. You can see, based on the posts and links here, the variety of grainages that your rod could potentially throw.

    There must be somebody in your area that geeks out on the Spey; and thus, owns a bunch of different lines. Poppy at the Red Shed will send you three lines at a time to try. Send them back and keep one or two or send them all back and try more.

    I've seen shops, manufacturers and their reps, in some cases, as much as 80 grains off on their recommendations. I'm sure there's someone out there that runs a Skagit Compact 570g on their Echo TR7 as recommended by the manufacturer but every single person I know has picked the 540g over the 570g in lining that rod.

    Another challenge with Spey is, when learning, it frequently seems like black magic. It's not. Try different lines with different grainages and when it's right, even as a beginner, you should be able to tell what works well.
    Cheers,
    Ed
     
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  2. mtgreenheads

    mtgreenheads Member

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    Dragging this one up again. Leaning towards a Reddington Dually, 11' 5 wt, with a Rio Switch Chucker line.

    Any opinions or experience with this rig?

    Thanks!

    Bob
     
  3. hydrological

    hydrological beads are NOT flies and snagging is just ghetto

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    if you're just learning to spey cast, a 12.5-13.5' rod will make the learninng curve soooo much more enjoyable. so will a bit heavier rod. a 13 ' 7wt is about ideal. later, the shorter rod will be gravy.
    not to mention plenty of mt. rivers have room for even a 15' rod. 7wt is not always overkill for an(actually) 18" wild fish. it just means landing fish quicker, and isn't that the point?
     
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  4. Ian Broadie

    Ian Broadie Flyfishing is so "Metal"

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    I totally agree learning to two handed cast on a switch rod is not the way to go, a switch rod when used properly (they are not merely short two handed fly rods) is more of an advanced tactics tool that when lined properly can be either cast as a two hander or a single hander. However if you still want to check out the Reddington Dually, the 13' 7wt is a really nice rod for the price and I really enjoyed the opportunity to test it out last November..... I should really get around to writing the review on it that I've been putting off :S
     
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  5. hookedonthefly

    hookedonthefly Active Member

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    Ok...I can't stand it. Trout in Montana's big rivers...

    Echo SR5 Switch with 6wt or 7wt Ambush with tips
    Meiser 4/5/6 Highlander Spey with 390 Skagit Compact with tips or Scandi 420g
    Burkie 7125 with Nextcast 5/6 Fall Favorite 45 and just plain waking/skating. Don't let the 7 fool you...it's RAD!
    I Digress,
    Ed
     
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