The Cripple Pattern, magic or what?

Discussion in 'Fly Tying' started by GAT, Dec 11, 2012.

  1. Big E

    Big E Moderator Staff Member

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    Yep...that's what I was trying to think of. Never gave it much thought as I always thought that they were just trying to TM a tying style that could be done on any hook.

    There is another hook out there and I also apologize for not remembering the name of it. I have some at home in my flytying desk and many years ago entered a flytying competition with a fly tied with it but was a mayfly. I believe the hook was called an elephant hook or something Umbrella hook...see below post...which allowed the hook to be below the surface in a dropped style much like this:

    [​IMG]

    And just for clarification, the USD fly pics were from conversations that I had years ago when I lived in the UK with Roy Christie. I believe it was right at the time when he first came out with an article on USD tying.

    Its hell to get old, I can't remember all the sorted details. I do remember though that they are true-to-hatch but cannot speak to the hook-up ratio as I don't fish them.

    To each his own on tying style. I tend to think that the enjoyment comes in many ways; be it from tying in an unconvential style or from finding out that the style actually can catch fish. I tend to take more enjoyment from my tying than my catching but also understand that not everyone feels the same as I.
     
  2. GAT

    GAT Dumbfounded

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    Informative thread. Thanks for the responses. I've gleaned some ideas for emerger style patterns.
     
  3. Big E

    Big E Moderator Staff Member

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    So I did some more digging and I remembered the name....it's called an umbrella hook.

    [​IMG]

    Here's a mayfly tied on the hook:

    [​IMG]

    And an emerger:

    [​IMG]

    I think this will get you closer to what you are looking for GAT.
     
  4. GAT

    GAT Dumbfounded

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    Interesting hook. There must be a downside. Partridge once made a hook with an extension to the shank for tying extended body mayfly patterns. The hooks were expensive and had just one little problem: you couldn't keep a fish on the hook because the metal extension worked like a lever so the fly would pop out of the mouth of the fish. Sure, you could get a lot of strikes but you couldn't hook any of the fish that hit the pattern. Talk about frustrating!!!

    Obviously.... the hook was designed by a flyfishing sadist.
     
  5. Big E

    Big E Moderator Staff Member

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    Sorry to keep posting on this. Was just looking thru my flyting pics and seen a fly I tied that would work as well....CDC parasol midge

    [​IMG]
     
  6. GAT

    GAT Dumbfounded

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    Eric, I can see how that one would work much better than the so called "cripple". Wrapping the CDC feather looks like it would be a bit tricky.

    Gene
     
  7. GAT

    GAT Dumbfounded

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    We're kind'a getting off the subject but what the heck, it's an interesting thread.

    Before Mustad bought out Partridge, Partridge offered some really weird-ass hooks. I don't know if Mustad continues to sell them under the Partridge name or not.

    This is the one with the extended body built into the hook. You can tie great looking extended patterns with this guys but you'll never keep a fish hooked:

    Yorkshire Fly Body K10
    [​IMG]

    This one is practical for tying nymph patterns with a tapered body. However, the hooks were expensive so not so practical for a wet fly that you'll tend to lose on the bottom:
    H3ST
    [​IMG]
     
  8. jeff bandy

    jeff bandy Make my day

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    Having been in the same train of thought, I was shown a pattern that worked very well. Thread wrap body and a CDC wing tied up like in "example B" Rub the body in the mud and make sure to keep the CDC clean. The mud rubbed into the threads brakes the surface tension, causing the bend to sink. The CDC rides in/on the film.
     
  9. Preston

    Preston Active Member

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    After watching Ralph Cutter's Bugs of the Underworld, I tried my hand at an inverted midge pattern with some success. As noted above, emerging midges often force their way through the surface film by pressing the tip of the abdomen against the underside to apply the leverage necessary to force the head through the film. Cutter reports observing numbers of midges "hanging" in this U-shaped attitude while fish pick them off like popcorn. Once the surface film is penetrated the humpbacked thorax rises almost straight up as the legs push the adult midge out of the nymphal shuck.

    Here's a picture of my inverted midge pattern.

    DSCF2741.JPG
     
  10. silvercreek

    silvercreek Active Member

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    Well done!!!

    Now fish it and see if it works.
     
  11. Jim Wallace

    Jim Wallace Smells like low tide.

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    This has been a interesting and educational thread. Thanks everyone!
    I was thinking of tying some black gnat emergers.
     
  12. Preston

    Preston Active Member

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    Of course, I have and it does.
     
  13. GAT

    GAT Dumbfounded

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    This is an example of exactly how patterns should be tested before claiming they will defy the way of the world and float on the surface in a manner they simply can not do.

    A pattern may catch fish but perhaps not for the reason the originator of the fly claims it works. The above photos in this thread show quite clearly how patterns are truly presented to the fish... not an assumption as to how the pattern looks in the water.
     
  14. Mark Mercer

    Mark Mercer Member

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    Preston, great looking patten, just curious but I've played with these types of patterns before, mostly for midge pupas on scud hooks (14 - 18), when I throw them in a bowl of water they usually sit correctly but almost all the time when I fish them they just lay on there sides and don't have enough weight to brake the surface film. Have you had that problem with yours?
    Is the tension of the surface film in your normal lake or pond, not counting things like oil and algae and mud, different than tap water in a bowl? Just wondering....Anyone?
     
  15. GAT

    GAT Dumbfounded

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    My friend, Rocky and I tried casting traditional Catskill dry fly patterns in a mud puddle while the other guy watched how they landed. Half of the time the flies hit the water on their sides with the hook off to the side and not submerged... this is why I switched to a parachute style of dry fly pattern.

    Most of my midge emerger patterns are either tied on heavy wire hooks or include some manner of bead to overcome the water tension problem. A small glass bead doesn't add much weight but does help break the surface.