Thinamabobbers kind of suck. What's better?

Discussion in 'Fly Fishing Forum' started by JesseC, Dec 30, 2011.

  1. jeff bandy

    jeff bandy Make my day

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    He's not the only one.
     
  2. Derek Young

    Derek Young Emerging Rivers Guide Services

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    Must have been the howling wind, I don't yell on the river. :)
     
  3. Ed Call

    Ed Call Mumbling Moderator Staff Member

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    Yeah, that was me when I was rowing you! hehe
     
  4. jwg

    jwg Active Member

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  5. Ed Call

    Ed Call Mumbling Moderator Staff Member

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    Make your own yarnies with a tiny tubefly tube inside for the vertical. Peg it on the lower end at your desired depth, this will allow your jig to drift true, and will show if your dragging or not. Solved.
     
  6. JesseC

    JesseC Active Member

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    Can you make me some? As a disabled blind fisherman I am unable to do so myself. Thank you for your kindness.
     
  7. Ed Call

    Ed Call Mumbling Moderator Staff Member

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    Bull crap, you are lazy. Tie your yarnie indicators as freaking big as you wish to float a damn anchor if that suits your fancy. The longer you leave the tube shaft, the more it will react like those long skinny "steelhead stalker" type gear floats. You have a tube fly tool or needle to tie them, right?
     
  8. Rob Allen

    Rob Allen Active Member

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    the end of your brightly colored fly line
     
  9. Steve Vaughn

    Steve Vaughn Member

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    Jesse - I like the Thingamasucks for the most part but the "feel" method is probably the most versatile. The latter does take practice but once you get it, it works great. Anyway, for the vertical indication issue you mentioned, I'm thinking that if you were to use a permanent marker on the float you would get a visual indication of its orientation. Just a thought.
     
  10. freestoneangler

    freestoneangler Not to be confused with Freestone

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    The "tenkara" of nymph fishing... and certainly fixes your issue as to which indicator to use :ray1:
     
  11. Old Man

    Old Man Just an Old Man (NFR)

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    Well I like the thingambobber's. I fished with a balloon one time and the damn fish hit the Balloon. It was a small RB on the Madison. I also have several different types of things that are used as bobbers, but I always come back to the round plastic ones.
     
  12. tkww

    tkww Member

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    I'd like to share a couple opinions. If you're down near the bottom, the current is slower than up top. The closer you are to the bottom, the more true this becomes. IMO, you shouldn't be straight up and down because you'd be pulling the fly through the slower water. In fact that's how I know I'm actually getting down--you can see the moment your indicator suddenly starts subtlety dragging. If it's too far into the the drift, I add more weight, or lengthen. If it's too soon in the drift, I usually fear there's too much weight or too long a line, meaning there's a good chance I'll be hanging up all the time. If you're wondering about your drift, fish EXACTLY like a dry fly. Never let it drag downstream (upstream is alright, see above), and never let your line get down beneath the indicator. Mending is an integral part of nymphing.

    The reason I don't like using big dries is because the contrast of the indicator is much better against the water. And that's important for being able to pick out the subtleties. If it's all close work and short distances the dry can work for me, but when I'm casting a ways out I find the dry just blends in too much. Also, you get strikes on it, but if it's big enough to be useful, it's too big IMO. I guess I'm thinking of smaller fish and smaller water here. Big fish can take down the flies and I'd consider it on those rivers. But if a fish strikes and misses, I find it's hard to catch them on anything else, which is to say, the nymph you're using. And hanging a two lines of the hook increases the missed takes, regardless of the fly size.

    And if you're thinking 'where I fish, they can take down a...size 12 stimi, let's say--I would suggest that you're not using enough weight to get down quickly enough and/or deep enough. Which once you do, the size 12 won't be enough either, or it will sog out and stop floating too quickly. I'm referring to real nymphing here, not this pansy hanging a size 16 dropper down on foot and half of 5x tippet because I commit to being a real nympher stuff.

    Obviously there are a lot of varied situations. If the water is a consistent depth and not too deep, you can do a lot more things and be effective. Riffles on big rivers come to mind. Fishing holding shallower, back eddies, etc. But if it's conflicting currents, roiling water and hydrodynamics at play, deep water, etc., a lot of that stuff just doesn't cut it.

    Lastly, I think a straight-down hang very good for stillwater fishing. Where there is no current to near-instantly agitate the indicator on a strike, the slack from the curving corner on an inline indicator gives the fish a lot of time to spit the fly out. I can't count the number of times I've set the hook and it's already too late. If the indicator is on fine tippet it's less of a problem but if you're hanging it down a ways and the indicator is on the thicker butt section, that stuff just doesn't bend sharply enough to be optimum--unless there's more weight on it than what I prefer to stillwater fish with. If you're boat fishing and/or don't have to cast much, a leader of thinner line is very useful for stillwater--sinks quicker, straightens out easier, and gives you a better idea of what's going on down below.
     
  13. Brazda

    Brazda Fly Fishing guide "The Bogy House" Lodge

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    As with all indicators they take a learning curve to READ, I too found the Thingamaboobs tougher to use until I learned to read them correctly, Nothing is failsafe or automatic, I do have some CUSTOM additions to my indicator use and still use some yarn or cork combinations at times when they are situationally best. Basically they either take a learning curve in the cast or the read. Each one has its best use. Finally sometimes its not the boobers fault its the rigging below:)
     
  14. Ed Call

    Ed Call Mumbling Moderator Staff Member

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    Does everyone use the thingamabobbers with your leader looped through like the instructions, or do you prefer to tie them on with a tag end? I've seen a few folks that spend a lot of time on the river that use them tied on. I inquired with one gent, he said they never slip that way, ride true in the water, track better and seem to fish better. I've not tried this yet, but I do hate that they slip and kink the crap out of the leader. Mostly now I use the newer ones with the attached peg to pin the leader in place. Improves the slippage, but not the kinks.
     
  15. g_smolt

    g_smolt Recreational User

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    I like thingamabobbers for a few applications, but they are pretty crude for others. They absolutely rule in big moving water and for long-distance work.

    Ed, for your rigging question, here is an alternate method - I use a leader with a heavy, short butt section (25#, 2ft) handshake-looped to the loop on the end of the flyline. I make sure that my butt loop is about 3" deep, so that when I put my bobber on (regular way, looped over in lark's-head fashion), it is wholly on the doubled portion of the loop, bumped up tight to the flyline junction. This accomplishes a few things - 1) there is no mono in between the flyline and the indicator, making it easy to mend all the way to the indi and also preventing "false reads", as sunk mono is liable to turn the indi unnaturally and make you believe your rig is doing things that it really isn't. 2) the flyline butted up to the indi gives yet another "tell" as to what is going on underneath the surface - which side is your flyline on, and where is it pointing? 3) When properly butted to the flyline over a loop, the thingyboober NEVER slides, and I mean never. Basically, after you pull the knot of the loop thru that teeny hole in the indi, you practically have to cut the leader to get it off.