To you Steelhead Authors

Discussion in 'Steelhead' started by DanielOcean, Sep 20, 2017.

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  1. Creatch'r

    Creatch'r Heavies...

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    Fishing well is about instincts. Instincts are crafted by experience but there is also an X Factor at play there where people let their gut guide them into fish more than their brain. Personally I think there is definitely something to it. It's more than the right fly or the secret run or the latest fashion. My wise buddy always says: "see the box as it appears before you....."

    Not everyone can really see.
     
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  2. Shad

    Shad Active Member

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    I liked the earlier thoughts about how most steelhead books are about people as much or more than fish. I personally don't mind that, but I'd never given it much thought.

    There was a time when I fancied myself a prospective fishing writer, about steelhead in particular. At that time, I envisioned a lot of waxing poetic in my style. Since then, I've learned that (serious) steelheading is done in relative solitude, and enduring seemingly countless hours of fruitless casting, in sometimes miserable conditions, brings a few choice thoughts to mind; none of them particularly poetic.

    Looking back, it's hard to understand why I would subject myself to the tortures of modern steelheading. It really is an almost insane pursuit.

    @Flyborg said a steelhead taking a swung fly provides what might be a more intense high than heroin. I think he's right. What besides addiction can make otherwise responsible people do the foolish things we often do for a decent chance at a steelhead?
     
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  3. Yard Sale

    Yard Sale Huge Member

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    Thats some bagger vance shit right there.
     
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  4. Salmo_g

    Salmo_g Well-Known Member

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    A very long time friend is a good steelhead angler. I called him "the Great Blue Heron" because he stood in the river from can't see in the morning 'til can't see at night, fishing the whole day long. He's caught a lot of steelhead. Another friend, recently deceased, was also a very good steelhead angler. He fished about half as many hours per year as the Great Blue Heron yet caught about the same number of steelhead. He was nick-named the "Human Gill Net" for his seemingly uncanny ability to always catch fish. The contrasting examples of these two angler friends got me to thinking that if I fished smarter instead of harder, I might up my steelhead game.

    The above reminds me that I should add another chapter to "How to fish good for Steelhead." The chapter title will be, "How to fish smarter." Naturally, prior to fishing smarter, the prospective angler, like DO, must learn two skills: 1. Know how to read water so as to not waste time fishing where steelhead aren't; and 2. Know how to properly present the fly, which isn't hard, but does require a little skill.

    Fishing smarter is a strategy intending to fish for steelhead where steelhead are and when they are there. That seems simple and logical, so where's the problem. The problem, such as it is, is that a pool well known for holding steelhead, only holds them for a relatively few days each year. So it can be said that fishing for them in that pool on any other day of the year is the antithesis of fishing smarter. I speculate that DO got skunked yet again the other day because he fished a pool or pools that contained no steelhead.

    Fishing smarter for steelhead has become more complicated in recent years due to reductions in steelhead abundance in most rivers that support steelhead runs and to correspondingly large increases in the number of anglers determined to pursue steelhead despite the daunting odds against success. So how does one fish smarter for steelhead under these conditions? Well, if I post that, you won't buy the book.

    Sg
     
  5. Creatch'r

    Creatch'r Heavies...

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    Excellent post Salmo. When I have time I have something to add. As a disclaimer, I don't feel at all like I am one of those people, and I'm not necessarily interested in comparing myself against anyone that's not why I fish. Teddy Roosevelt once said something along the lines of "comparison is the thief of joy." And I rather like that line. But I'm intrigued by human gill nets.
     
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  6. JS

    JS Active Member

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    That TR quote is gospel. I will only add that comparison is the intro to judgement, which in my experience is toxic to human mental health.


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  7. DanielOcean

    DanielOcean Active Member

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    You are toxic to human mental health. PFFT:D
     
    Last edited: Sep 28, 2017
  8. JS

    JS Active Member

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    Lulz. Perhaps, to the most feeble of minds.


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  9. Rob Allen

    Rob Allen Active Member

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    Self focus is the most destructive thing to mental health... followed closely by steelheading
     
  10. dustinchromers

    dustinchromers Active Member

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    Then there are those who do not see the box at all and simply never consider the confines of it. They fish outside of it. They present their flies in unique ways to fit the situation. The floating line makes more of this possible. The skagit while efficient is really a one trick pony. I learned the most about presentation when I started making serious efforts fishing winter fish with the floater and not ever even considering a tip in the summer. Longer lines and irons permit a control the young gun skagit jockey had never even thought of. That's why guys fish heavy tips. To atone for not having that piece of the presentation puzzle. It's so much clearer when you know how your fly is fishing because you have an infinite say in where it fishes. And all if this is available with a mono leader and weightless fly on an iron dressed properly and sparse.
     
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  11. JS

    JS Active Member

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    So true. I think fishing the skater almost exclusively all summer-fall for three years has made me a much more effective angler with the swung fly; which translate to winter work as well, even with a tip.

    Not to speak for Creatch, but "The Box" in his afore mentioned post is a colloquial metaphor used to describe a juicy piece of water.


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  12. JS

    JS Active Member

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    I disagree. The manic nature of steelheading exists within the person. Trust me, you can still suffer mental health issues without steelhead. Furthermore, through intense "self focus" or rather self reflection (along with various forms of therapy, both conventional and nonconventional) I have overcome the darker sides of my manic tendencies. So you can be mentally healthy and also be a steelhead nut. Even a dryline/dryfly steelhead nut.


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    Last edited: Sep 28, 2017
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  13. JS

    JS Active Member

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    Daniel Ocean I actually have a good recommendation for you....Advanced Fly Fishing for Steelhead by Deke Meyers.

    I got that book when I was 15 and it was pretty much my gospel for ten years. Most of it is purely technical information. The tackle info is pretty outdated, but is still interesting stuff to read, especially if you fancy building your own mow tips or things of that nature.


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  14. DanielOcean

    DanielOcean Active Member

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    So, I have no idea how this thread grew the assumption that I was looking for "instruction". I have already had the instruction I just need the river time (something I have not been able to do due to health). Steelhead is indeed simple in theory. I actually bought a new kindle for my family, was setting it up, and decided to take it for spin by reading a couple books I had in the library when I noticed the poetic mumbo jumbo. While I was bored at work I felt the steelhead forum needed a jolt of life that clearly only I can give it. So I created this bullshit thread. LOL I promise the fish is happening this fall/winter. I am healthy now and am able to put these simple practices to places, and rivers that have fish that I have really never been able to do before, at least consistently at the volume of river hours it is required. I hope to see you all out there.
     
  15. JS

    JS Active Member

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    My apologies chrome master! Hahahahahaha


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