Tongue Weight And Height For Your Avg Drift Boat?

Discussion in 'Watercraft' started by A.A., Jan 2, 2017.

  1. A.A.

    A.A. Active Member

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    What's your experience? Making sure I have the right ball drop, and wondering if an outback 3.6L could tow it (says it's rated to tow 3,000 lbs). Thanks.
     
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  2. jeff bandy

    jeff bandy Make my day

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    Depends on your trailer. Ideally you want the trailer to ride level.
     
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  3. jake-e-boy

    jake-e-boy sans caféine

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    Yeah you can tow it

    edit: i've towed my fishrite with my old 04 subaru wagon and it had the flat 4, so i imagine the 6 would make it even easier. know i had to have a rise on my hitch though and not a drop.
     
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2017
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  4. A.A.

    A.A. Active Member

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    Found this chart:

    image.jpeg

    1000 lbs without trailer brakes. Tongue weight 200 lbs. Now what do you think? A DB plus trailer might come in around 1000+ lbs?

    Here's the kicker...just bought my wife a nice Tahoe with the max trailering package. And I'm sitting here trying to figure out the best way to tow a drift boat. Mainly because she doesn't want to get it dirty and I insist on getting in and out of my vehicles with muddy wading boots on. I'm sure I'll be fine towing locally. I'll use hers for any distance.
     
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  5. walove

    walove Active Member

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    The average fiberglass drift boat and trailer package would be around 800lbs empty. With 10% tongue weight. Most bow stops on trailers can be moved forward and back to adjust tongue weight. You want to trailer to sit level, but i'd guess a ball height of 17". I'd happily tow a drift boat with a 6cyl subaru. The biggest concern would be ground clearance at some boat ramps.
     
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  6. MT_Flyfisher

    MT_Flyfisher Active Member

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    I would think that your car should be able to tow a drift boat without any problems, but there can be quite a bit of variation in weight between boats and trailers, and perhaps some variation in ball height as well as the ball diameter in some instances.

    I'd guess that the last 2 drift boats I owned, both were 16' low profile fiberglass Clackacraft and Hyde"s, weighed around 750#, for the boat and trailer combined, but I never actually weighed them on a scale. The rule of thumb is you should have 10-15% of the total weight on the ball (hitch). After lifting the tongues of my trailers many times, I suspect my tongue weight wasn't much more than 75#, if that.

    You can easily make your trailer tongue weight lighter or heavier, by moving the weight that you carry in you boat or on the trailer, farther forward or rearward. For example, I had an anchor mount on the trailer frame of my Hyde that was just forward of the axles, and that added a LOT of weight on the tongue. Sometimes, I kept the anchor inside the boat, behind the rower's seat, which lighted the tongue weight.

    My trailer ball heights on both these boats was approximately 17" (measured from the ground to the top of the ball).
     
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  7. A.A.

    A.A. Active Member

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    Perfect, thanks! That's helpful info.
     
  8. Chic Worthing

    Chic Worthing New Member

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    If you have an anchor that is "just" forward of the axle, it will increase the tongue load "just" a bit. If you mount it half way between the axle and the hitch, 1/2 will be on the hitch and half on the axle. Simple math. If you mount it behind the axle, the weight on the tongue will decrease and the weight on the axle will increase by the decreased weight on the tongue plus the weight of the item. Again simple math. It is all about ratios of moment arms. Class dismissed