Total confusion

#1
The more I learn about casting these two handed rods the more I find myself utterly confused. My most recent confusion is this:

I cast a 7/8 Beulah classic spey. I currently have on it a 550grain skagit line. Now when I am fishing for winter fish I usually connect a sink tip to the skagit line and then 3ish feet of mono.

Now that it is summer I was thinking I would connect a 10 foot floating MOW tip to the skagit and then a 10foot tapered leader and fish smaller flies for summer runs. However, I was talking to someone the other day and they suggested I not waste find fishing a skagit head to summers.

So my question is should I be looking at getting a scandi line for summer? or is a skagit with a floating MOW tip going to be fine?

I thank you in advance for any advice you are will to provide.
 

shawn k

Active Member
#2
The more I learn about casting these two handed rods the more I find myself utterly confused. My most recent confusion is this:

I cast a 7/8 Beulah classic spey. I currently have on it a 550grain skagit line. Now when I am fishing for winter fish I usually connect a sink tip to the skagit line and then 3ish feet of mono.

Now that it is summer I was thinking I would connect a 10 foot floating MOW tip to the skagit and then a 10foot tapered leader and fish smaller flies for summer runs. However, I was talking to someone the other day and they suggested I not waste find fishing a skagit head to summers.

So my question is should I be looking at getting a scandi line for summer? or is a skagit with a floating MOW tip going to be fine?

I thank you in advance for any advice you are will to provide.
I would say skip the scandi and either get an Airflo rage or tactical steelhead line for that rod.
 
G

golfman65

Guest
#3
Wes,
the only problem you can run into with fishing your set up is the weight difference between your overall line weight with the winter sinking tip on and a floating one now..

i.e. your using a 550 skagit, so lets say your tip is 150 grain...you need to find a floating mow tip at the same 150 or bump up your skagit line to say 600 grain and go from there..

Before all the resident experts argue otherwise...This came straight from Ed Wards mouth on how to use skagits with floating tips in the summer...so argue with him not me..

If you want a new line I would suggest one like a winter authority delta or maybe one of the new steelhead scandi's that can handle tips ...you can fish them year round and matching your floating tip to sink tip weight means when you find the weight that matches your rod you don't have to switch lines with seasons and can your learning curve for casting will benefit from using one line...

Not that I do that as I have four or five head wallets full of lines...it's kind of part of the game to find out what lines your rod(s) can cast well!!! lol
 

Salmo_g

Well-Known Member
#5
Wes,

Consider this for one minute: the steelhead don't know that you're fishing a Skagit head, winter or summer. I use a Skagit head whenever I want to fish a sink tip, but I wouldn't hesitate to add a floating tip to it if I didn't have a bunch of other floating lines laying around to choose from.

Sg
 

fredaevans

Active Member
#6
One other very viable 'option' is to have Steve Gotshall (Medford, Oregon) make you a 'custom cut line' for the rod. You can get these as a 'full line' or just as a head. Steve knows/has the spec's on darned near every 2-hander ever built. Be prepared for a 20 minute tel-con as he's going to run you through your paces as to the rod, your casting skills, type of water you'll fish, what fish, etc., and etc.

The line (or just the head so you can 'swap out heads as you want) will be made for those specific conditions. I've several of his lines/heads and they're the 'Bee's Knees.' What you'll get is anything but an 'off the shelf' line as to length and head weight.

Better yet, one of his 'custom cuts' won't cost you a penny more than something 'out of a box.'
 
#7
There is no right answer. I know a guide who fishes the Skagit lines, with great success, all summer long. I enjoy the transition of fishing Skagit lines on my death star in winter to fishing Scandi lines on my Burke 7133 in summer. I have been surprised fishing weighted tandem tubes on the Scandi line this year.Enjoy the journey...
 

Rick Sharp

Active Member
#9
Fred nailed it, call Steve Godshall and discuss a skandit kit with him, a simple change of from sinkng T-tips to scandi and poly's problem solved and no need to swap lines out or the such just a wallet with some various tips and your off and running. Won't cost any more than store bought stuff but made especially for your rod, can't get that from a manufacture.
 
#10
If you do: [email protected] or 541 840 2594

And no I don't get a 'cut,' (bad pun intended) I pay up like everyone else ... but gladly.But I'm more than glad to share what we in the Spey 'Clave know. Bye the bye, if you purchase a rod from R B Meiser or an ACR (Gary Anderson) they usually come with a matched line as part of the 'deal.'
fae
 

yuhina

Tropical member
#13
Wes,
the only problem you can run into with fishing your set up is the weight difference between your overall line weight with the winter sinking tip on and a floating one now..

i.e. your using a 550 skagit, so lets say your tip is 150 grain...you need to find a floating mow tip at the same 150 or bump up your skagit line to say 600 grain and go from there..

Before all the resident experts argue otherwise...This came straight from Ed Wards mouth on how to use skagits with floating tips in the summer...so argue with him not me..
Simply wrong advice. Ed NEVER suggest this...

Wes, If you use 550 grain skagit head for regular sinktip work... then, you will need LIGHTER skagit head for the floating tip work to have the same feel of casting. I suggest you try 450-480 skagit head for your floating tips fishing (normally range about 100 grain @12' )

BTW, the SkagitMaster 1 DVD has explained this mechanic very well... you might want to check it out...
 
G

golfman65

Guest
#14
you know Yuhina...I stood knee deep in the water at rockport a couple years back, when they had the small claves at the steelhead park...
and Ed stood right out in front of us and explained it exactly as I related....and exactly the opposite of what your saying..

Now maybe Ed has changed his mind...but it made more sense to me to fish a line that works for your casting stroke at the same overall weight and as he described...with more finesse that way...then the opposite...

Then again...I personally don't use skagits anymore so who freaking knows?