Trolling action - what do you do?

Discussion in 'Stillwater' started by Sourdoughs, Nov 21, 2007.

  1. ak_powder_monkey

    ak_powder_monkey Proud to Be Alaskan

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    Trolling is fly fishing as long as there is a fly involved and your weight is 18 inches above the fly... The State of Alaska Says So! :lol:

    Seriously Though trolling with a fly rod and fly line and fly is just as much fly fishing as standing in one place and swinging a fly on a 500 grain sink tip. I mean when I'm out trolling in the Naknek river for kings and everyone looks at me funny because instead of wiggle warts I have a fly rod with 600 grains on the line I sure feel like I'm fly fishing...
     
  2. Porter

    Porter Active Member

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    I have trolled many different ways...the most success I have had is when moving away from shore, such as Pass Lake...cast towards shore and start trolling away from the shoreline (or rock islands...especially a particular eastern wa lake)

    It's all fun ....I just hate kicking my float tube against some of those strong winds on certain eastern wa lakes...like Lenice bawling:
     
  3. P-FITZ98

    P-FITZ98 Active Member

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    I grew up trolling flys.Still do it.Only difference is I traded the old Penn 209 with leadcore for a 8wt with whatever wt line it takes to get to the fish.I like to give it a jerky-retreive,which allways seems to work.On a short strike,put it in their face.We call that the "dinner-bell retreive".We landed over 50 fish a few weeks ago at Rufus doing this in a warm,enclosed heated boat.Took a break every-so-often to have a beer.Someday, maybe Ill graduate to full "flyfisherman" status, but untill then,Ill keep tying,learning,and knocking the piss out of fish.:beer2:
     
  4. Daryle Holmstrom

    Daryle Holmstrom retiredfishak

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    I troll once in a while with a fly on a slow sink line.
     
  5. Daryle Holmstrom

    Daryle Holmstrom retiredfishak

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    .
    I need heater for the pass lake boat , since I'm disabled I could use it and invite many a person but I won't.

    Fished Pass for many years and if I used the Pass I'd probably get stoned from the road. LOL

    Daryle
     
  6. Go Fish

    Go Fish Language, its a virus

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    When I troll flies I use (what we call) the twitch, to give a different action to the fly. This is simply moving the fly line an inch or more (depending on what fly I am are using) while trolling. The erratic movement seems to make the bug more realistic which gets more fish to take it. Of course you also need to be at the right depth, the right speed, with the right bug.
     
  7. Keith Hixson

    Keith Hixson Active Member

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    In deep lakes on hot summer days the fish go deep, especially the big ones. Trolling allows me to go deep. It becomes an extremely effective method of catching fish. I like to troll very deep and slow with damsel fly nymphs and dragon fly nymphs or streamers. Twitching the fly or giving it a slight jerk ever so often will increase the amount of hits. You'll be surprised how many really big fish live in those deep lakes.
    Now those who don't troll but just cast often don't catch the really big fish because they often don't go deep enough.

    [Originally Posted by nz trout bum
    I guess that I just have never met many (any?) trollers who can cast well, observe hatches carefully, know anything much about entomology, imitate naturals with their flies, tie well, are able to adjust for conditions (fish shallow, not spook pods of fish, sight fish to feeing trout etc.)]

    The reply posted by nz trout bum is the reason why fly fishermen get such a bad reputation. I have been fly fishing for over 30 years. I troll and I can cast very well. I learned on streams but I also enjoy fishing lakes. Deep lakes like Rufus Woods require different techniques than smaller and shallower lakes. I suppose that trolling with a fly is to me a different method of fishing with a fly, hence fly fishing. I hope that NZ trout bum will learn that to insult folks and their methods of fly fishing is snobbery at its core and really has no place in the world of fly fishing.

    Keith
     
  8. panderson3

    panderson3 New Member

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    i just can't resist chiming in on this one. and by the way i am new to this, so here goes. i have to agree with nz trout bum. when i was anew flyfisherman and i didn't have the skills of fishing a hatch or retrieving a fly in a way that would interest the fish, i would troll. then i really learned how to fish still water by casting and retrieving (which is really flyfishing) then i started to catch more and much larger fish. my observation is that the majority of the fish i see caught by trolling are the smaller less selective and less causious fish. yes, there are always exceptions, but i can't help what i see. sorry if this sounds arrogant or if you feel put down, and yes, you can troll that fly if you want.
     
  9. Jim Wallace

    Jim Wallace Smells like low tide.

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    Gee, thanks, mon. Thats big of you. Now I feel a whole lot better about myself.:beathead:
     
  10. Gary Thompson

    Gary Thompson dirty dog

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    I don't get it?
    To fly fish or not to fly fish was not the ?
    How to troll a fly, was that not the ?
    Trolling a fly w/fly rod and line is fly fishing. If a guy is trolling really deep it's hard to pick up and cast to risers but who cares when your catching fish on the troll.
    Speaking of trolls or lurkers.
    Here's a ? for ya. How do ya catch a troll?
    Great fishing report!!!!
    The bite is on at X lake, using X fly. Then drive by the X lake on Saturday AM and have a good laugh at all the tooners freezing there ass's off w/no fish to show for it.
     
  11. Chad Lewis

    Chad Lewis NEVER wonder what to do with your free time

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    [QUOTThen drive by the X lake on Saturday AM and have a good laugh at all the tooners freezing there ass's off w/no fish to show for it. E][/QUOTE]

    Gary, you're a bad, bad man :thumb:

    I think you should do what you like. Kind of a cop-out, huh? There's nothing wrong with making your own rules, and as long as you're not blackballed by your own friends, who cares? I've got nothing against a guy who can't cast past his nose but who wants to fish a lake/river with a fly rod. Anyway, if you like to troll a fly then go for it. I personally like to cast, so I tend to do that. I'd lay odds that a lot of guys trolling can cast pretty well when they want too, especially if they're catching fish.

    I've been in one situation on Lone Lake when there were several guys trolling, and I was pretty much fishing circles around them with a cast and retrieve. Had to be the action of the fly, as stated before, and fly choice probably had something to do with it. Having said that, if they would have been catching all the fish I probably would have started doing what they were doing, pumped them for info on fly choice, etc. etc. 'Cause sometimes you just gotta do what catches the fish!
     
  12. Tim Lockhart

    Tim Lockhart Active Member

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    Yup.
    and yup.

    I can understand the logic behind, "it looks too easy so it just ain't fly fishin'," however... 1) C'mon, does it really take that much skill to cast?? (Nope), and 2) If you think it's just about chuckin' a big-harry down on a sinking line, you're sadly mistaken. Guys who are sucking wind on the troll likely aren't familiar with the other 95% of it. Has nothing to do with "trolling blows - casting works better." I'd say some parts of it are more difficult if you know what you're doing (placing it where it needs to be at depth, presenting a certain way at depth, all the subtleties sensed by "feel," not sight, etc.). Also, if everything you hook came as a 'ka-boom' out of nowhere, you've missed the other 80% of your strikes. And so on, and so on.

    Anyhow, someone experienced will have skill in trolling, cast-n-strip, still presentation, all the moving water stuff, blah, blah, blah, but moreover can decipher which is best at different times. Each is just another tool in the box, and is really just the endgame once the more important things are sorted out...timing, predicting behavior, trends in weather & temps, feeding habits, location, location, location...far more related to your success yet so overlooked it's laughable. All I know is those guys who make it look easy banging 'em left and right usually have this stuff figured out. Easy to assume it's the fly selected and 'masterful' cast to go along with it, or just luck. 9 out of 10 times though, it's all that unseen and unsaid stuff.

    Enough of that crap. Now for some useful stuff. Ford Fenders' Guide to a Successful Troll (Copyright pending): 1. Look away, light a smoke or whatever...guaranteed strike (they can see you); 2. "Here fishy fishy...here fishy fishy..." (they can hear you); 3. Don't watch too closely but keep a hand on that rod (they like free stuff); 4. Wanna have your sorry ass outfished? Bring your wife; 5. Pee on it before you cast it.
     
  13. PT

    PT Physhicist

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    What I really enjoy about people who post absolutes is that they really only show their own ignorance. It's the same when someone asks which rod is the best/which guide/chevy or ford.

    Anyone who limits their techniques is really only limiting their catch and also limiting the experience they can gain. But that's their choice.

    Troll, mooch or cast and retrieve. That really is flyfishing!:thumb:
     
  14. tjf

    tjf Member

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    For trout
    Soon after stocking and through most of the summer, I have excellent success with my trolling motor set at its lowest speed, using a full sinking line with my favorite streamer - sometimes an occassional "twitch" to the line.

    Fall, same thing only I turn off the motor, "twitch" the line until I get about three feet off line in the bottom of the boat and then turn the motor on until the line barely pulls tight, then drift again, repeating.

    Winter, same as fall, only slower. Also, anchor, cast, wait until line is nearly straight down then hand twist or "twitch".

    During the active times of the year, I vary the above by slow or fast strips until I figure out what the fish prefer.

    For other types of fish - depends what you are hunting for.
     
  15. Andrew Lawrence

    Andrew Lawrence Active Member

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    But there is another method I like which does not involve an anchor and does not involve trolling. I like to either use a very slow trolling motor, or fins, and cruise the shoreline casting to structure or rises. I'll do this with dries if they are keyed in on the surface, or with streamers\buggers all other times. Works great for hunting browns, bass, crappie, brookies, and other species that like to hide in structure and ambush their prey.



    Great Method! And one that I utilize quite often with great success! I use this technique mostly for searching out were the fish are on a particular day. Sometimes, I enjoy just sitting back and casting to the shoreline, while steadily making my way up and down the shallows.