Tying your own leaders

Discussion in 'Stillwater' started by Chef, Dec 10, 2010.

  1. IveofIone

    IveofIone Active Member

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    Chef, The above responses have covered all the bases-there is excellent advice in there. The only thing I can add from having tied my own leaders for almost 25 years is use a micrometer to measure your material. I have seen way too many instances where a 4X tippit spool was actually larger than a 3X, etc. And many times a spool will list the diameter at say.007" when it is actually .0095'' for instance. When I buy spools I usually mike the material then write the actual size on the spool with a black marking pen.

    Nowadays I am only using two materials-Rio Powerflex and Orvis Mirage and both of those products have been consistently accurate with their labeling.

    Ive
     
  2. Olive bugger

    Olive bugger Active Member

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    I never thought about that Ive. Good idea. Thanks for the heads up.
     
  3. wet line

    wet line New Member

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    Ive,

    Excellent point!!!

    I have encountered that dissparity when re-building from a manufactured leader, so it is not so much what a label says but rather is my tie on a size smaller than what I am tying onto.

    Dave
     
  4. Roundeye777

    Roundeye777 always angling

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    good call on the RIO and Orvis, by far the most consistent.
     
  5. LakeLuster

    LakeLuster Guest

    I tied my own leaders for years. At that time I was mostly interested in fishing streams. Since becoming addicted to lakes I've been using knotless manufactured leaders. As stated above, when fishing deep its fine to just use a 4 ft length of tippet. I think being confident tying your own leaders is really helpful even if you mostly use store bought leaders. I still carry the various spools of material to tie a leader from scratch. Then, if my tippet gets too short or the leader gets damaged, I can rebuild the leader so that it continues to turn over correctly. This has proved especially helpful on trips lasting a couple of days or more. I don't have to carry a ton of expensive manufactured leaders and am confident I'll always have a well tuned leader. I remember practicing bloodknots while watching TV. For the reasons stated above, I still consider that time well spent, even though I currently buy most of leaders.
     
  6. Ed Call

    Ed Call Mumbling Moderator Staff Member

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    I like tying some for turnover of bigger things. Dries normally are fished on factory tapered leaders. I have a small patch of towel or chamois that I wet and use to clean any junk off my knots. Works way better than fingers alone. Shortens the fly leader knot "junk" cleanup.
     
  7. coastal cutthroat

    coastal cutthroat Active Member

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    Sometimes I tie my own, steelhead. big bushy dries and some lake/sinking; although I've started using poly leaders for steelhead, and like it and sinking leaders are often just 3 ft of level something x.

    As for tying them to save money, I suspect it is like flies; on only another 100,000 or so I'll have broken even -- provided I don't buy any more material . . .
     
  8. Timsan

    Timsan Member

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    After reading an article years ago on some 90+ year old tying his own I decided to try it. Although I never write the recipes down, its not hard to get the leader correct for the fly in use.