Wanting to hear all about your Delta Spey set ups and casting tips.

Discussion in 'Spey Clave' started by James Waggoner, Mar 21, 2011.

  1. Big Tuna

    Big Tuna Member

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    I've never really noticed any effect from the running line. I definitely think that all running lines are not created equal, but I've never experienced substantial differences in my casting from just the running line. I would say it's a casting issue. I believe you are a scandi or skagit guy. The difference in head length will take a bit of getting used to, but I don't think the learning curve is all that steep. One consideration might be line weight. When you look at Airflo line recs, you will sometimes see differences between Dec's recs and Tim's recs. I have tended to go with the upper end of the line recs because a heavier line seems to match my casting style. You could easily try out the 7/8 and see if there is a noticeable difference. Of course, if the grain weight of the 7/8 is well above the grain window for your rod, that would probably not be a good idea.
     
  2. James Waggoner

    James Waggoner Active Member

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    I am used to using 30# amnesia for running line...the running line on this small light head (6/7 delta) is like rope...relitively speaking. Seems like the windcutter I owned had smaller/lighter running line then this does. Anyway the head seems a tad heavy not too light, so going up a line size sounds further from what I'm looking for. The 6/7 loads the rod nicely enough, so I'll just stick with it. As far as running lines go, I do believe they do effect casting roll out, when casting a heavier fly on a 38' DDC head, I'll allow the last 10 - 15' of amnesia to be pulled through my fingers to assist roll out.

    I'm really starting to appreciate this line, can't wait for summer and the full floating Delta spey.
     
  3. shotgunner

    shotgunner Anywhere ~ Anytime

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    Great lines, love my two. I agree the run line seems a bit oversized on my 7/8.. maybe not so much on the 8/9 . The original Windcutters [pre color change] had a smaller still dia runner.. Manufacturors quik cure against warrenty issues, step up the material.. pretty common.

    If necessary [sometimes it just 'is'] you can force a line / leader to turn over by applying a smooth haul in your run line near the end of the shot.

    Sounds like your cast is doing great to me :thumb:
     
  4. DocDoc

    DocDoc Member

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    Don't like the Delta running line? Cut it off and connect the AirFlo ridge running line (I use 30#). You can weld, use a flex zap splice, or braid to make the join.
     
  5. James Waggoner

    James Waggoner Active Member

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    Which one would you use? I would think if using a flex zap or Braided splice, I'd probably want it a foot or so off the end of the running line portion, before the head, to keep it out of the guides when casting. As far as the Weld, would be nice have it just "reel side" of the pinch point when casting to utilize the existing fat line for handling. I like the idea of the welded splice, any advice to how long the splice should be?

    Thanks James.
     
  6. James Waggoner

    James Waggoner Active Member

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    Philster, I always value your opinion and expertise...I use a about 2' of overhang, but To be clear: Large loops aren't a problem, my tight loop comment had to do with the fact I was generating tailing loops when doing so. And as far as shooting, I can shoot 40' or more, it just doesn't have that zip through the guides I'm used to when using shorter heads I suppose. The issue is tailing loops, as the line rolls out it wants to foul on itself or collide with itself on the final roll out. I agree with earlier posters, this is a power issue caused by slack, lack of smooth acceleration or bottom hand timing and application.

    So with the above symptoms clearly in mind, what do you think Dr. "Phil"ster...Can you help me?"
     
  7. Leroy Laviolet

    Leroy Laviolet Aint no nookie like chinookie

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    iiiiirrrrrttttccchhh!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    Don't cut it !!!!! The line designers probably got it right, Wink wink !!
    Keep learning how to cast that line , stay with it awhile befor you think of chopping that line--------------------------------!!!!!!
     
  8. fisshman26

    fisshman26 Active Member

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    Go ahead and cut it but leave the head intact and splice in or loop the head and use 20lb ridge running line, I do this with all of my looong belly lines, you will regain the line speed that you like so much. But remember to leave the head intact and cut where the running line starts to meet the rear taper, you hang this outside of the tip for maximum speed and distance.
    Guess I should read the full post before I post lol, James you are on the right track.
     
  9. Leroy Laviolet

    Leroy Laviolet Aint no nookie like chinookie

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    Based on this, if I'm reading it correctly, you want to cut it based on thinking you'll get better turn over with a lighter running line, correct??
    If so, DON'T CUT IT !!!!!!
    It'll have nothing to do with turn over-
    If my reading is correct, you are NOT on the right track if this is the motive:ray1:
     
  10. James Waggoner

    James Waggoner Active Member

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    Bruce, thanks for the vote of confidence. I know you would be quick to straighten me out if I was on the wrong track, so this means a lot to me.

    James
     
  11. fisshman26

    fisshman26 Active Member

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    No Worries James, now as far as turnover problems it usually is associated with the anchor not being lined up 180 degrees and not starting the forward cast with the bottom hand, try checking these 2 out, video of course would be helpfull
     
  12. Nooksack Mac

    Nooksack Mac Active Member

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    One way you could probably smooth out the turnover is to use a tapered leader, even though you stay with a short one. A single-strand short leader is practical enough in that it's all right if it drops to the water in sloppy coils, because it allows the fly to begin sinking immediately. But it doesn't make for smooth transition in flight. Even a short leader can be tapered to allow the energy to transfer mostly smoothly, from tip to leader to fly. A simple leader that I use a lot in the winter is a 4-foot OX, made with 15" of .017" butt, 15" of .015" and an 18" fleuro tippet of .011".

    Try casting a small, light fly or a tuft of yarn with the same tip and leader. If it turns over better, the problem may lie with casting big, heavy flies. Of course a big MOAL or Intruder is an impediment to smooth casting.
     
  13. Nooksack Mac

    Nooksack Mac Active Member

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    One way you could probably smooth out the turnover is to use a tapered leader, even though you stay with a short one. A single-strand short leader is practical enough in that it's all right if it drops to the water in sloppy coils, because it allows the fly to begin sinking immediately. But it doesn't make for smooth transition in flight. Even a short leader can be tapered to allow the energy to transfer mostly smoothly, from tip to leader to fly. A simple leader that I use a lot in the winter is a 4-foot OX, made with 15" of .017" butt, 15" of .015" and an 18" fleuro tippet of .011".

    Try casting a small, light fly or a tuft of yarn with the same tip and leader. If it turns over better, the problem may lie with casting big, heavy flies. Of course a big MOAL or Intruder is an impediment to smooth casting.
     
  14. Nooksack Mac

    Nooksack Mac Active Member

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    Arrgh! I can't find a way to remove my double post. Sorry, folks.
     
  15. Leroy Laviolet

    Leroy Laviolet Aint no nookie like chinookie

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