Article WDFW Proposal #15 A Fighting Chance For Washington's Greatest Native Trout Fishery

Discussion in 'Fly Fishing Forum' started by Steve Bird, Nov 30, 2012.

  1. David Dalan

    David Dalan 69°19'15.35" N 18°44'22.74" E

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    Correct. And I think proper fisheries management must include strategies to suppress/remove foreign and invasive species, regardless of their economic value. Especially if they are in the process of displacing economically, ecologically and culturally valuable species.
     
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  2. Pat Lat

    Pat Lat Mad Flyentist

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    no I just hate to see an invasive species killing off native stocks. REGARDLESS of who, or how many people oppose or support it, the real thread is about getting opinions on the subject, which you seem to have made you argument clear. in that case quit calling people ignorant without actually knowing them and I'll quit posting things that are intended to piss you off,

    I'm tired of it and I'm sure everyone else is too.
     
  3. Pat Lat

    Pat Lat Mad Flyentist

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    Double like
     
  4. Ryan Higgins

    Ryan Higgins Active Member

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    Which is what this proposal is doing. It is providing options to suppress the population to sustainable levels. I just disagree that option #4 is going to do this better than option #3. Removal as I have said before will be impossible. They should also remove the triploids should they not? They are non native and prey upon fry and smolt.
     
  5. Ryan Higgins

    Ryan Higgins Active Member

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    What I'm posting is facts in support of option #3 and countering opposition in order to make an informed argument one way or the other. I believe the only one I've called ignorant is the one making ignorant statements, or to your admission trolling.

    Tight lines.
     
  6. Pat Lat

    Pat Lat Mad Flyentist

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    If triploids someday develop functioning reproductive organs then ya probably.
     
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  7. David Dalan

    David Dalan 69°19'15.35" N 18°44'22.74" E

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    From old netting and fish-wheel practices to modern over harvest in all its forms, the power of the take is inarguable. Harvest can and has caused the disappearance of a uncountable number of fish stocks. In lakes. In rivers. In the oceans. So I simply cannot accept the presumption that warm water species cannot be effectively exterminated. Will they be? Only time will tell, certainly worth a shot.

    When it comes to invasives, i take a rather unpopular zero tolerance stance. Wild Horses, white tail deer in the west, browns in north america, transplanted rainbows are all worthy of extermination.
     
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  8. Steve Bird

    Steve Bird Member

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    Alpine 4x4, I like spiney rays as well. I live close & fish the Pend Orielle for pike & smallmouth regularly. I'm still catching big pike there. A buddy who lives in Ione caught the largest of his life this fall. Maybe we just got lucky on the days we fished. Due to its dams, I don't see the Pend Orielle any longer viable as a self sustaining trout fishery, as the Tribe over there claims it is trying to recover. I certainly don't see the worry over pike predation on trout, while the Tribe operates a smallmouth bass hatchery & introduces them into the river. It's a mess. And I'm not overly concerned about fenestration of pike into the Reach, frankly. They've been in the Spokane Arm for years, but LR & the upper Reach are far less than ideal environments for them. I could be wrong, but I doubt they'll ever be a real menace here. And I like the idea of people being able to fish walleye too, where they are viable and not a threat to a more valuable native fishery, which appears to be the case in the LR drainage. As for option #4, WDFW does give a brief synopsis of the reason at their site & also on the link I provided, so nobody is simply drumming that option without explanation, as you suggest. And of course, I agree, it's probably impossible to completely remove walleye now, though I'm not ruling out the possibility in the future. When I consider the size of the water, the level of fishing pressure, the numbers of fish, I just don't see the surgical removal of any particular age group, as your info & opinion seem to suggest, but rather an across-the-board diminishment in numbers as anglers catch & or release the spectrum of age groups. Besides, surveys show that as it stands right now, walleye fishermen, on average, aren't even catching the current limit. So the way I see it, lifting regs altogether won't have much of an affect at all, except to provide a bit more balance. With walleye eating 70% of the native redbands spawned in the Reach, we still have an amazing fishery. If the measure gains us another few % that might ensure sustainability.
     
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  9. Steve Bird

    Steve Bird Member

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    There is certainly a diversity of opinion here. Yet it seems everybody wants to do the right thing, as they see it. Want to thank all who commented at the WDFW site & who weighed in here. You are saints. I updated the article at my blog & strung some photos along with it to show you what this is really all about. I'll be posting some more info there, as well as study links for those who are interested. Check out the two wild rainbows over 30" that Jack Mitchell caught this fall. Peace. http://columbiatrout.blogspot.com/
     
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  10. Greg Armstrong

    Greg Armstrong Active Member

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    Steve,
    Nice site and blog. Those who haven't visited it - should. I found it informative and insightful.
    Our remaining native fish need all the help and protection they can get. History has shown they can't do it for themselves - it is up to us.
    I voted for option # 4.
     
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  11. Steelie Mike

    Steelie Mike Active Member

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    Thanks for posting this.
     
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  12. P-FITZ98

    P-FITZ98 Member

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    Pat Lat, you should try bass sometime, those and walleye both are WAY better than troutIMOI.Having grown up fishing Roosevelt, Im all for the #4.I can even remember casting a bubble bobber and a caddis up north as a kid on what some refer to as "the Jurasic"(always laugh when i hear that) before the guides all started in, and there were walleye then. That was about 30 years ago when i first started fishing up there. Ill be 40 next month.Its about time they lift the limit on the tasty ones that are like pulling a stump in.
     
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  13. Steve Bird

    Steve Bird Member

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    Thanks for the excellent report at your blog. Cool site. Good writing. (I tried to leave a comment but could not pass the word ID filter.)
     
  14. zen leecher aka bill w

    zen leecher aka bill w born to work, forced to fish

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    I will say Steelie Mike's blog post is about as balanced as it can get.
     
  15. Steve Bird

    Steve Bird Member

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    Thanks for supporting option #4. Smallies are very good eating.

    I should point out that I've lived beside the American Reach (upper Jurrasic)(I gave Jack a lot of sh*t about that! - amuses me too!) since 1972, & pulled my first guide license in 1979. Started out mostly guiding for walleye. And there were several guiding there before me that I know of, so guides "started in" long before you know. And that's a good thing, from my perspective, particularly in a county that is among the most economically depressed in the country. And particularly a county where much of the economy is based on extraction. Yet now we see the potential of a growing local economy based on sustaining our natural rescources, our fish, our scenery... Seems to me a healthy rural economy boosted by a catch & release flyfishing industry might be held up as a model for what sustainable economy could be, & one might even stretch to say, regarding all facets of our society.