What constitutes an intruder?

Discussion in 'Fly Tying' started by mike doughty, Jan 11, 2007.

  1. mike doughty

    mike doughty Honorary Member

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    with all the so called intruders being tied and posted in the gallery, i'm just wondering what exactly makes an intruder an intruder? i've seen some intruders that have some differences so was just wondering
     
  2. Rob Zelk

    Rob Zelk I swing, therefore i am.

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    Here you go Doughty, most people don't tie true intruders, because they take a while to tie. One thing to remember when tying these guys are the materials. Now Ed devised a fly for a purpose, one that keeps its buggy profile even in heavy currents and that looks intrusive in clear water. Now if you start playing around and throwing materials in the recipie that take the purpose of the fly, materials that collapse under current such as marabou, it takes away the flies effectiveness(marabou will collapse and just add extra weight in heavy currents, ie, you might as well be fishing a regular marabou which takes 2 minuets to tie instead of 40 for an intruder); here is the real recipie and some pics if you visit the site below:

    http://www.speypages.com/speyclave/showthread.php?t=22464

    The Intruder
    by Ed Ward

    Hook: I tie this on a tube - usually 21/2 - 3” long and use a short-Shanked Partridge Nordic Single Spey #4

    Ed uses quite a complicated but ingenious method. The fly itself is tied on a straightened and cut-off 2/0 Mustad 36890 and the trailer hook is a #1 or 2 Diachii 2451. He then ties a loop of 25lb mono 1/4” from the tip of the hook. Tie in oval gold tinsel and take 2 wraps in back of the loop and 1 in front (this flares the loop out).

    Rear hackle: Tie in a long, soft, black hackle and take 3 wraps

    Feelers: Tie in 9 strands of dyed orange ostrich plume on each side of the fly. Tie in dyed orange ringneck pheasant tail and take 3 or 4 turns.

    Body: Tie in a long skinny badger hackle and leave hanging. Tie in burnt orange chenille and wrap forward to within 1/2” of the eye of the hook. Wind the badger hackle forward ending with 3 successive turns at the point at where the chenille ends. Spin a small clump of black deerhair (this flares the front hackle) trim butts flush with the shank. Tie in orange ringneck pheasant tail and take 3 or 4 turns.

    Shell: Tie in 2 cree hackles on each side of the shank for “wings.” Tie in dyed orange guinea hackle and take 4 or 5 turns.

    Head: Tie in a small ball of black chenille. Tie in lead eyes. Whip finish. Cover head with Aquaseal thinned with Cotol.

    Tying note 1: Ringneck pheasant tails are split down the stem with a single-edge razor, so they can be wrapped as a hackle. Soaking the tail for 10 minutes in warm water can aid in the splitting and wrapping process. Now I soak my tails in water with a dollop of hair conditioner in it overnight. Then I start at the top and strip the fibres from each side of the stem - it works great - the conditioner keeps the feather supple enough to wrap even after it is dry.

    Tying note 2: Other species of pheasant tail produce different appearances. Amherst is striking and I have used Silver pheasant.

    Tying note 3: Try any colour combinations you like!

    Rigging the Intruder Ed rigs this like the British “needle-fly.” Pass your leader through the eye of the hook, then through the mono loop, then through a 1/4” long piece of 16 gauge electrical wire from which the wire has been removed. Tie the leader to the hook with a non-slip loop knot. Push the electrical insulation up onto the end of the hookshank and slowly pull on the leader to draw the knot snugly into the other end of the insulation, making everything pulls together with the hook point riding up.

    I tie on tubes and it eliminates the complicated rigging, the same could be accomplished on a Waddington shank. Originally Ed tied this on a large regular hook but was unhappy with the holding power as well as the potential for injuring fish and went to his present method.

    I think that this is a brilliant pattern. It has a great profile and fantastic movement. As a steelhead pattern it is not a pattern everyone like - almost solely because of its huge size. I have always been partial to big flies for steelhead so it was not tough for me to accept!

    I have begun to experiment with various colours and feathers, Ed himself says he rarely ties 2 the same - so have at it!


    Here are a few of my variations (also posted previously). BTW a search of this forum would produce a number of photos.
    Attached Images
     
  3. mike doughty

    mike doughty Honorary Member

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    thanks rob. i've tied the intruder pattern from irish anglers, i guess that is a true intruder. shit actually i didn't think that took much longer then other variations that i have tied. thanks for the response
     
  4. SpeyrodMike

    SpeyrodMike Member

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    How do you attach the ostrich herl so that it's spread out evenly through the fly.
     
  5. Philster

    Philster Active Member

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    Well you can take as long to tie a fly as you wish. Consumption of adult beverages generally slows down the process... One thing most people leave out is the Deer Hair collar up front. It slows you down but I feel it does impact the action of the fly.

    As to getting the herl to flair evenly, first there has to be something behind it to kick it out, and secondly you just tie in very small clumps, no more than four pieces evenly around the fly.
     
  6. Willie Bodger

    Willie Bodger Still, nothing clever to say...

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    I haven't seen an Intruder pattern with a deer hair collar. Sounds like that would lend itself more nicely to a conehead than dumbell eyes. I just may have to look into that...
     
  7. softwaterstructure

    softwaterstructure Banned or Parked

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    jack's intruder isnt an intruder. simple as that!!

    secondly, intruders are soooooooooooooooooooooooooo 3 yers ago!
     
  8. fredaevans

    fredaevans Active Member

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    After reading the 'how,' now you understand why many of us refer to them as 'a dead bird full of buck shot.':thumb:

    Fred
     
  9. Philster

    Philster Active Member

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    The original Ed Ward pattern called for it.
     
  10. Rob Zelk

    Rob Zelk I swing, therefore i am.

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    Supposedly, Ed only uses the intruder about 2% of the time he spends fishing. They sure can be cool looking, but I'm always afraid of loosing them, and since they take so much time to tie, you will seldomly find me fishing one.
     
  11. halcyon

    halcyon Hallelujah, I'm a Bum!!!

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    Where can one find a published receipe for this original pattern??

    Regards,
     
  12. halcyon

    halcyon Hallelujah, I'm a Bum!!!

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    Here is a version of this style of fly that is a bit expensive to loose.
    http://www.flycraftangling.com/flies_arc.html?a=26

    Regards,
     
  13. Philster

    Philster Active Member

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    It was published in a mag somewhere. Can't recall where. Matt Burke has posted the reference in the past. However, just follow the recipe you have and spin a fairly sparse collar of deer hair behind the front hackle. It supports the front hackle, and is stiff enough to create a little turbulence to add action to the softer materials behind. it. Also increases the visual bulk as it doesn't collapse like an unsupported hackle would.
     
  14. John Hicks

    John Hicks Owner and operator of Sea Run Pursuits

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    Halcyon, I don't know but I use hen hackles wound around to the point that it looks a bit like a dry fly colar. In tank test this works great at keeping the ostrich flaired out.
     
  15. Philster

    Philster Active Member

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    You have to remember that in Canada, polar bear is no big deal. Heck, they use leaf blowers to clear it out of the gutters. It's so common they actually dye with cool aid! Not joking on the cool aid part.