What do cutts like?

Discussion in 'Saltwater' started by GUZ808, Dec 5, 2007.

  1. Preston

    Preston Active Member

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    I tie the amohipod on scud hooks as small as size 16, the euphausid I usually tie on something like a Gamakatsu SS15 in a size 8.

    Starman, you bring up an interesting point. While euphausids do, on occasion, use a crayfish-style backflip, they usually swim with their legs, with their bodies held straight. Like euphausids (and freshwater scuds) they may also swim on their sides or upside down. I'm looking forward to seeing Bruce Ferguson's updated material in the new edition of Fly Fishing for Pacific Salmon because I know he's spent a lot of time intensively studying the invertebrates that salmon eat.

    I have, in the past, tied this pattern backward and did not find it to be any more effective when tied that way. I use extra-small, black bead-chain for the eyes, this gets it below the surface quickly and gives it a little bit of a jigging action on the retrieve. I usually fish it on a floating line if I can see fish working at the surface and, absent that, will sometimes fish it on an intermediate line as a searching pattern.

    By the way, this pattern was developed by the late Bob McLaughlin and one of the reasons I like it is its simplicity. The tail, mouth parts and antennae are pearl Krystalflash and the body is pearl Cactus chenille (Estaz, Crystal chenille); pale orange and pale pink work well too. The last step is to trim most of the chenille fibers along the back and sides, leaving those underneath to represent legs.
     
  2. GUZ808

    GUZ808 New Member

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    This fish on my attchment is what I think is a coho. but could anyone tell me a bit about this species. how big they get and their season to fish them?

    thanks
     
  3. Kevin Ryan

    Kevin Ryan Member

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    GUZ808, it looks like a silver to me. These resident fish are now entering their third year and, if they stay in the Sound and have sufficient food, they will grow nicely through the Spring and Summer reaching 24+ inches by the Fall and four to five pounds. Of course, if the season is open where you are and if the fish had no adipose fin (the small one on his back between the dorsal fin and the tail fin), you can keep the fish for the table. If it were a cutthroat or a salmon with the adipose fin intact, you would have to release it since it would be considered a wild fish.

    When you bring in a fish you plan to release, try not to lift it out of the water or pull it up on the beach. This reduces the released fish's chance of survival. Gently (if he'll let you) remove the barbless hook and send him on his way.
     
  4. GUZ808

    GUZ808 New Member

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    Thanks for the great info. but what do you mean when you say they are entering their third year?
     
  5. Starman77

    Starman77 Active Member

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    Thanks for the explanation and it is good to know that you've tried tying the pattern backwards without being any more effective. Saves me a lot of work and experimentation...

    Rex
     
  6. gigharborflyfisher

    gigharborflyfisher Native Trout Hunter

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    Third year means that they are three years old. In the winter resident coho fishing can be very good in the south sound and they tend not to be overly picky most of the time. A good tan and white marabou clouser will catch a lot of fish. From what I can tell so far, it seems like this year's resident coho population is down a bit from last year.
     
  7. kosel80

    kosel80 Native Trout Fan

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    I used to fish for SRCs when they were a little more plentifull and I found that Muddler minnows and olive woolly buggers were the best. Pretty much anything that looks like a sculpin . I you tie a bugger with a pheasant herl hackle like a traditional wet fly instead of the palmered hackle it gives it more of a sculpin look. having said that the biggest SRC I have seen caught was on a elk hair caddis fished dry in the puget sound.wierd.
     
  8. Kevin Ryan

    Kevin Ryan Member

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    GUZ, if I have this figured right, the silvers are incubated in the Fall of year 1, then transfered to net pens or other holding facilities (Minter Creek Hatchery) in the early Spring of year 2 and held there as late as conditions permit, usually around May or maybe the first of June, if we are lucky, and then released. They might be five or six inches long by then. If conditions are right, many stay in the Sound throught the Summer and over the next Winter. Now they are getting to be 16 to 18 inches or more and are of real interest to us. Those that don't end up seal snacks or meet other fates continue to grow through the next Summer, their third year, and are great quarries as Fall again approaches. There are fewer of them, but they are still feeding and the lucky fly flinger may find a few with his "shock 'n awe" or clouser tied to three inches long or so.
     
  9. GUZ808

    GUZ808 New Member

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    Great info thanks alot