What is it that puts flyfishermen off about using a kayak for a fishing platform?

Discussion in 'Watercraft' started by Krusty, Oct 21, 2011.

  1. Jim Wallace

    Jim Wallace Smells like low tide.

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2004
    Messages:
    5,956
    Likes Received:
    735
    Location:
    Cranberry Country...a glorified coastal swamp!
    Oh yeah. Don't leave any of your hatches open while fishing. Get what you need from inside the hull, then close and seal the hatch asap. I keep my bilge pump on a leash (so it doesn't creep away from my reach), just inside my 8" hatch that is in front of my seat.

    I see that you claim to be a minimalist when gearing up. Right on, as "less is more," but don't forget your safety gear. I am gradually eliminating any extra gear or tackle that I find I don't use, except for the safety gear.
     
  2. Bradley Miller

    Bradley Miller Dances with fish

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2012
    Messages:
    472
    Likes Received:
    129
    Location:
    Tacoma
    Roger that.....hadn't thought of a bilge pump. Looks like either Cabellas or West Marine is going to get more of my money. Not that Ed left me much. (just kidding, mod!).
    My short list for this week is: paddle leash, air horn, a dry bag, and some waterproof pants. Oh...and a pirate flag.
     
  3. Jim Wallace

    Jim Wallace Smells like low tide.

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2004
    Messages:
    5,956
    Likes Received:
    735
    Location:
    Cranberry Country...a glorified coastal swamp!
    Brad, you will have to come out here with your photo gear next summer and paddle the Elk River estuary with me.
    I use fishfinder sonars in my boats. I use my old portable Piranha in my U-12 and Don Hill mini-drifter, with water-filled foam pucks as thru-hull transducer mounts. Press in the transducer, and fill puck with water.
    I got a Lowrance Mark IV DSI fishfinder/gps unit, and it works OK, but the grayscale screen is small and very hard to read in bright sunlight. I need to make a sun shield for it, or its going to be almost useless. I have it mounted out near my feet on my Tarpon. I have no problem reaching the buttons on it, but I need to mount it much closer so that I can decipher the gps display. Part of this is due to the small sized screen, part is due to the nature of the gps map and the fact that its grayscale.
    The sonar display info seems easier to read. I usually don't have to take off my Cocoons to read the display. I like the DSI imaging, as I can see the bottom structure better than ever.

    For some reason, the GPS display is not as easy to decipher in the sunlight. If I'm wearing my Cocoons polaroids over my regular glasses, I usually have to take off the Cocoons to decipher the gps display, even if its up close. If just a little bit of salt spray gets on the screen, it gets even more difficult to read. Because of this, I can't recommend this unit. I am hoping that a sun shield helps.

    I'd go for a unit with a larger screen, and maybe a color display. Perhaps a seperate gps unit, handheld, so that I can keep it under cover and take it out and read it up close when I need to check my position. Good to have if the fog rolls in. Otherwise, the need for gps is questionable.
    In the morning wispy fog and overcast out on the Bay, I was able to note that I was trolling along the edge of the river channel, and the gps chart showed the depths fairly accurately, and indicated where the deeper spots in the channel were, so that I knew which way I wanted to head. Once the sun came out, the lightly salted gps display was mostly unreadable. So I just kept that unit switched on the sonar display for the rest of the day, since I could still squint and decipher that info.

    The screen and display on my old portable Piranha unit has less info on it, and thus is easier to read.

    I had both of 'em hooked up with transducers mounted on the transom of my johnboat when I had it out this Summer, though, so I could compare them. (apples and oranges).
     
  4. LCnSac

    LCnSac John or "LC"

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2011
    Messages:
    1,054
    Likes Received:
    297
    Location:
    Sacramento, CA
    Home Page:
    I am a huge fan of the Humminbird RF-35 wrist worn fish finder for the toon, tube, and yak. It's $80 with a wireless transducer, and I will put it up against either of my two $1000 sonars for utility and accuracy. It's the only finder I've ever had where you can literally "sight cast" to fish. Of course the primary use is depth, structure, and WT but due to its wide cone it can spot fish in very shallow water. It's portable and pretty bulletproof.
     
  5. Bradley Miller

    Bradley Miller Dances with fish

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2012
    Messages:
    472
    Likes Received:
    129
    Location:
    Tacoma
    Jim: Elk River......Grays Harbor area? Great idea. I always drive past Grays Harbor (on the way to the ocean, usually, or up 101) but have never explored the water there. Lets do that.
    Going to take your advice and scoot down to Cabellas and check out sonars for my new little boat. Not sure where the heck to mount it, as I think working space is kind of at a premium while sitting down, but I'll figure something out. Due to fishing budget considerations, I am going to forgo the GPS capability for now, I think. I do have GPS on my tablet device, with maps, that might serve in a pinch, but I'd be nervous about whipping that thing out in a salt water environment. I'm even thinking about taking this boat on an overnite camping trip.....we have some cool little islands that are close enough to paddle to, I think, and the boat will hold way more gear than I need for an overnighter. We'll see.

    LCnSac: I'm going to look at one of those, but I do like the idea of a bigger screen. How much structure data can they show on a wrist sized screen? But the price is sure right. On sale right now tool. Hmmm.....
     
  6. LCnSac

    LCnSac John or "LC"

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2011
    Messages:
    1,054
    Likes Received:
    297
    Location:
    Sacramento, CA
    Home Page:
    The detail is fine. Small screen, small pixels. All you need, honestly. You should check and see if the transducer can take salt.
     
  7. Ed Call

    Ed Call Mumbling Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2008
    Messages:
    17,781
    Likes Received:
    2,047
    Location:
    Kitsap Peninsula
    Bradley, great meeting you today. I hope that 12'er suits your needs. Let me know when it is time to paddle, I'll be interested in meeting up again.
     
  8. Bradley Miller

    Bradley Miller Dances with fish

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2012
    Messages:
    472
    Likes Received:
    129
    Location:
    Tacoma
    Thanks dude. Yes, lets do that! Thanks for making this work....your timing
    couldn't have been better!
     
  9. underachiever

    underachiever !

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2012
    Messages:
    1,430
    Likes Received:
    1,309
    Location:
    suburban hell
    I've been following this thread for a while now because I've been considering an inflatable kayak. I don't plan on using it as a fishing platform as much as I'd use it for transport down rivers where I'd get out and wade, so I find this comment interesting. The benefit of a dry suit vs waders is obvious when you think about falling off/out or capsizing. Is there a downfall to wading in a drysuit?

    I've been considering something like the IK linked below. I don't have any place to store a boat/toon and something like this would easily fit in my small car. It also seems that it wouldn't be unreasonable to portage by myself either.
    http://www.nrsweb.com/shop/product.asp?pfid=16363
     
  10. ptychocheilus

    ptychocheilus New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2010
    Messages:
    29
    Likes Received:
    13
    Location:
    Tennessee
    Why wear a full drysuit when you can pull a drytop over your waders when you're on the water, and remove it when you're wading or you need to thermoregulate? Much cheaper, too.

    IKs are great, but suffer from the same problem as most kayaks -- they're too squirrely to stand and fish.
     
  11. underachiever

    underachiever !

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2012
    Messages:
    1,430
    Likes Received:
    1,309
    Location:
    suburban hell
    Mostly I just don't know what my options are. I'm inexperienced in the watercraft area so this thread has caused me to have questions I've not previously thought about. I always just assumed I'd wear my normal wading stuff and be good to go. A drytop sounds like a better way to go.
    I'm really just looking at a way to cover more water and allow myself access to fishy water where the bank access is not possible because of private property or impassable terrain.
     
  12. Bradley Miller

    Bradley Miller Dances with fish

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2012
    Messages:
    472
    Likes Received:
    129
    Location:
    Tacoma
    Underachiever:
    We are sort of in the same boat, as it were. I took my new kayak out for a test spin today on very calm water, got fairly wet, but also get where no man has gone before....at least not on foot. Even getting in and out of the yak is a wet proposition, not to mention paddle dripping, and rain. I am thinking that next time out will be in waders....if for no other reason that I can step out of the yak if I want to or need to, stay relatively dry, and not worry too much about being cold or wet for the next few hours. I presume if they are cinched tight and I have a nice dry top over them, even if I were to capsize (which will happen sooner or later....) I should be able to get up and out of the water enough to keep them from filling up with water. Anyway, stay tuned. Thats my thinking today. Tomorrow's experiment is yet to be reported on. :)
     
  13. Sparrowhawk

    Sparrowhawk New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2012
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    This was a fun thread to find. I am a long time whitewater kayaker but new to fly fishing. Like others here I have lots of watercraft but mine all use a paddle. I'm getting geared up for fishing and don't want another boat.

    I can see the difficulties of managing both a rod and paddle but think I might have an idea to offer. Kayak water polo used to be popular. It was just like the normal game but done from a whitewater boat without paddles, just hands. Some of us used swimmer's webbed gloves for an advantage. The webbed gloves had a neoprene palm and nylon back and were fingerless (the fingertips are bare). They provide more propulsion than you might expect and even make an acceptable backup paddle. You could easily use something like that to position a kayak once you got to your destination and work a fly rod, anchor, or whatever.

    Sent from my SCH-I535 using Tapatalk 2
     
  14. ptychocheilus

    ptychocheilus New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2010
    Messages:
    29
    Likes Received:
    13
    Location:
    Tennessee
    Hand paddles work great as a backup (and you should always have a backup paddle of some sort along!), but they'd suck for trying to actually fish while wearing them. It's not that hard to pick up the paddle if you need to make a drift correction while you're fishing.
     
  15. Jim Wallace

    Jim Wallace Smells like low tide.

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2004
    Messages:
    5,956
    Likes Received:
    735
    Location:
    Cranberry Country...a glorified coastal swamp!
    I have a hand paddle that is waiting for a paint job, that's been hanging from a wire in my shop since mid-summer. Looks kind of like a ping-pong paddle. It will be leashed on a bungee, and ready to grab for a few quick corrective strokes, if I ever get around to finishing it.
    I've just been grabbing my 240 cm paddle and doing the one-armed thing, but that puts a lot of leverage on the ol' joints. Hand paddles are definitely useful.