What is your favorite historic Sea-Run Cutthroat Fly?

Discussion in 'Saltwater' started by Steve Rohrbach, Dec 21, 2011.

  1. kelvin

    kelvin Active Member

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  2. Joe Smolt

    Joe Smolt Member

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    How old does a fly need to be to be a "historic fly"? I often tie knudsen spiders because they last longer. Kinney's reverse spider is very different from most flies and I have a lot of confidence in that fly both in the salt and fresh water. I wonder if Mike would like to hear it called a historical fly.

    Kelvin - nice flat wings. I am starting to explore them and got to believe they will be awesome for SRCs. I am going to take some to florida and see if I can take some sea trout with them.

    Joe
     
  3. skyrise

    skyrise Active Member

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    cant remember the name of the fly, here is the material list.
    tail: red & yellow hackle mixed.
    body: peacock herl .
    rib: flat silver tinsel.
    hackle: red & yellow mix.
    wing: white calf or bucktail ( I use white marabou ).
    on a long shank hook.
    but really my #1 is .
    Soft hackle in many shades.
     
  4. Steve Rohrbach

    Steve Rohrbach Puget Sound Fly Fisher

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    I want to thank everyone for contributing to this thread. It reinforces just what a vibrant, creative group of fly fisherman participate here. We are so lucky to have people like Preston who is so willing to share his talent and knowledge. The creativity of kelvin with his double reverse spider. Curt Kraemer has taught me a lot with his tremendous understanding of our diverse fisheries. I have been lucky to fish with Roger Stephens who is the epitome of creativity. Roger brought my Slider to lunch today with junction tubing attached to the front of the tube with the leader trapped out the side (like a riffle hitch) to increase the motion on the retrieve. I am stunned by how much Steve Knapp has grown in his skills in just a year of fishing Puget Sound. His interest in Letcher Lambuth's Candlefish will contribute to the evolution of this historically important fly. Double D's willingness to share his flat wings this summer inspired me. Dry Fly Larry, I look forward to meeting you and fishing your Popsicle, which in time is sure to become "a historical SRC fly." And a thank you to Leland for his already historic Popper.
    Thank you all for contributing to a special early Christmas gift. Roger and I are already scheming about how to update some of these lost treasures with adaptation to tube flies or.......?
     
  5. SeaRun Fanatic

    SeaRun Fanatic Member

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    90%+ of all my cutties come to -

    Freshwater: Bucktail Coachman (clear water) and Polar Shrimp/Skykomish Sunrise (colored water).

    Salt: Is a Clouser "historic" yet? If so, light pink over white is my designated search pattern.
     
  6. Preston

    Preston Active Member

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    Letcher Lambuth was an innovative and imaginative fly tier. In the late forties and fifties he (and others, including Roy Patrick) pioneered salt water fly fishing for salmon and cutthroat. He netted baitfish in Elliot Bay and kept them in a cold, saltwater aquarium in his basement, observing them under differing lighting conditions. This was the basis for his baitfish series (candlefish and herring). I tied this candlefish (actually, a sandlance, the true candlefish being the eulachon, commonly called the Columbia River smelt) using bucktail, though I'm sure Letcher used polar bear hair. The pattern is from an early edition of Roy Patrick's fly pattern book and, if memory serves, the wing consists of three stacked layers; an underwing of mixed pale blue and pale green, a midwing of red, and a topping of mixed olive and French blue. This is one is tied much more sparsely than the one I tied for Les' book and, I think, much better looking.

    View attachment 46635
     
  7. kelvin

    kelvin Active Member

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    beautiful Preston
    as always
     
  8. Slipstream

    Slipstream Active Member

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    I nominate this thread for "Fly Tying Thread Of The Year" SS
     
  9. John Wallace

    John Wallace Active Member

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    How about the Dead Chicken. When nothing else works. It is my go to fly!
     
  10. Steve Rohrbach

    Steve Rohrbach Puget Sound Fly Fisher

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    John, the Dead Chicken is a great "historic fly" that sadly has been deceased in my Coastal Cutthroat box. It will return to an honored spot. I had a hard time going to sleep last night thinking of all the patterns that this thread will result in my tying in the coming weeks. I encourage all of you to post your efforts in the Salt Gallery so we can all benefit from your efforts.

    Preston's photo this morning is a perfect example of a fly that was a true game changer when tied by Letcher. Preston has taken the inspiration of Letcher's work and tied a fly that will bring many fish to hand this coming year.

    I hope everyone has a wonderful holiday season and that you treat yourselves to some special time at the vise.
     
  11. weiliwen

    weiliwen Active Member

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    I've learned an awful lot from this thread, thanks to all who contributed! Merry Christmas!
     
  12. weiliwen

    weiliwen Active Member

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    Could somebody post a picture, or better yet, the "recipe" for a Dead Chicken fly?
     
  13. Preston

    Preston Active Member

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    Already posted a picture but here it is again. Recipe as follows:

    Hook: standard nymph hook, size 6-10
    Tail: Small bunch red hackle fibers
    Body: Yellow chenille
    Rib: Five turns flat silver tinsel
    Hackle: 3-4 turns grizzly hackle.

    View attachment 46640
     
  14. John Wallace

    John Wallace Active Member

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    I would also add a white or black caif tail wing to it as a change. All work great. I met ED FOSS a couple of times when I was a kid. What a great guy. I've been very luck in my fishing time to have meet so my great fisherman that gave me some of there time. I've started going back to some of the old great patterns. It's been a lot of fun.
     
  15. Tom Bowden

    Tom Bowden Active Member

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    In Enos Bradner's book "Northwest Angling," there are two patterns listed which incorporate a strip of chamois for the tail - the "Shammy Royal" and "Shammy Bee." Bradner says " These "shammy" flies with their enticing action are very effective on sea-run cutthroats."

    I've always been curious. Has anyone ever tried them?

    Tom