What line to use

Discussion in 'Saltwater' started by William Wallace, May 8, 2008.

  1. William Wallace

    William Wallace Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2008
    Messages:
    623
    Likes Received:
    210
    Location:
    Chesterton IN
    Just woundering what type of line do most of you use for fishing SRC. Do most stay on top with a floating/intermediate or get down with something heavier. I know it would depend on depth and where the food source is, but everyone has there opinion.

    I am mainly a stream and lake fisherman and want to branch out and hit the salt. I did a little bit with my father who past away in 2006 down at Lincoln Park because he just lived up the street. If you ever saw a man with a grey bushy beard, laughed and smiled at everything, pad of paper taking notes on the tides and bait fish it was probably him. His life was fishing and he taught me alot. I did not get the chance to enjoy the SRC with him and I miss that. He was not only my father he was my mentor. I live in Spanaway and want to start but do not know where to go. Any tips would be great. I am having shoulder surgery next week and will be down for awhile but would love to come watch some people and get pointers while I am recouperating. Like I say any tips would be great.

    William F. Wallace Jr, United States Coast Guard, MK1
    aka "BRAVEHEART"
     
  2. dryflylarry

    dryflylarry "Chasing Riseforms"

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2003
    Messages:
    4,144
    Likes Received:
    657
    Location:
    Near the Fjord
    If you have only one choice, get a dry line, otherwise you should use both. I have switched back to using a slow sink tip on higher tides to get the fly nearer the bottom. I think it will improve your catches. I have switched through the years, and was using strictly a dry line for almost the last 3-4 years. But, I am back this year with the sink tip at higher tides. I tend to get hung up on the bottom if the tide is out too much. With a dry line, you can let your fly sink or weight it as well to get it down. Of course all depends on what kind of water you are fishing, fast or slow moving. I tend to chase trout in lakes and streams now until October, but look me up in October and I would be happy to put you on some fish.
     
  3. Anil

    Anil Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2004
    Messages:
    1,113
    Likes Received:
    299
    Location:
    Tacoma, WA, USA.
    I think with a screen name like Dry Fly Larry, any of us could have predicted what type of line he would recommend.:)
    I’m not trying to pick on him, because floating lines are quite useful, but I will offer a different opinion. Almost all of the anglers I know who fish cutthroat with a variety of patterns do so with a ‘clear’ intermediate line. I know that many people fish exclusively with floating lines in a variety of places. However, an intermediate line offers a few distinct advantages:
    1. Due to their somewhat stealthier color (clear) intermediate lines allow you to use a much shorter leader. A shorter leader is always easier to cast, particularly in the wind.
    2. Intermediate lines are slightly thinner than an equivalent floating line and ‘cut’ through the wind easier.
    3. When there is chop on the water an intermediate line will sink below this surface disturbance and provide a much straighter connection to the fly.
    Disadvantages:
    1. Clear lines all have a nylon monofilament core (standard fishing line). As anyone who has used standard fishing line will tell you, monofilament has a fair amount of memory. I am constantly amazed at how few people are taught how to easily and effectively stretch a fly line, but needless to say these lines perform much better with a good stretching.
    2. Fishing surface flies is extremely difficult if not impossible to do with a clear intermediate, even if you go through the effort to ‘grease’ one.
    In the past few years many anglers have switched to integrated intermediate shooting lines such as the Rio Outbound, S.A. Streamer Express and Airflo Forty Plus. (Do a search and you will find plenty of information and opinions). Without getting into that again, I’ll give you the same advice I give everyone in your position: If you double haul, get an integrated line, if you don’t, get a standard weight forward.
    Anil
     
  4. D3Smartie

    D3Smartie Active Member

    Joined:
    May 6, 2003
    Messages:
    1,987
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    WA
    floater will be better for more situations. I like the Rio Outbound. I also have an intermediate line but a lot of the time i cant use it from the beach because of the retrieve i am using.
    If you want to cover all situations, get 2 lines. to cover most, get a floater and learn how to fish poppers. they are a ton of fun!
     
  5. Tom Bowden

    Tom Bowden Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 1969
    Messages:
    513
    Likes Received:
    139
    Location:
    Black Diamond, WA
    I fish a clear intermediate most of the time, and switch to the floater only when using poppers or dry flies.

    In addition to the advantages Anil mentions, I catch a lot of sea-runs on the retrieve, within 10-20 feet of me. Some of these fish might be holding in closer than my cast, and pick up the fly fairly late in the retrieve. A clear line doesn't disturb the water between you and the fly as much as a solid line does.

    Floating lines certainly have their advantages as well.

    Tom
     
  6. dryflylarry

    dryflylarry "Chasing Riseforms"

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2003
    Messages:
    4,144
    Likes Received:
    657
    Location:
    Near the Fjord
    Braveheart-

    These are all good points. I think I pointed out having both lines if you want the best of both worlds, otherwise, go with the dry line by all means. I think D3Smartie and I are pretty much on the same page. I can tell you in my experience, especially in the last 5 years, that a dry line hasn't been much of a disadvantage for me. My last few years of experience has been that I have hookups on 90% of my cutthroat practically within the first 15 feet or less of my retrieve after the fly lands on the water. That may have something to do with my retrieve and fly however.
     
  7. Ethan G.

    Ethan G. I do science.. on fish..

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2007
    Messages:
    975
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Ellensburg, WA
    I use an Airflo 40+ Intermediate line most of the time. I can tell you that I end up kicking myself a lot when fish are thrashing the surface. Poppers are indeed a lot of fun, but I'm too cheap to get another spool and line.
    -Ethan
     
  8. Denny

    Denny Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2001
    Messages:
    4,279
    Likes Received:
    94
    Location:
    Seattle, WA, USA.
    iagree
     
  9. therealist

    therealist PNW

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2003
    Messages:
    26
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Seattle, WA
    Home Page:
    All the reasons Anil mentioned are great reasons but I still believe it is easier and more versatile be able to add an intermediate or heavier polyleader to an integrated shooting head line(full floating) when you feel you need to get down a bit than it is to have an intermediate head/full line and want to fish on the surface.

    A ton of fish are caught within very close proximity to you, floating line or intermediate.

    In an ideal world you would have a bimini loop at the end of your backing and buy both a floating/shooting head line like the Outbound or the 40+ as well as some sort of intermediate line. Switching each line out is very easy, takes a matter of a minute or so to do it either at the car or prior to heading out for the day.
     
  10. K2

    K2 New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2008
    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Washington
    I fish mostly a floating line because the beaches I go to don't have much of a grade to them. But for beaches with more of a grade go with Anil's advice and use a clear intermediate line

    cool name, FREEDOM!!!
     
  11. William Wallace

    William Wallace Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2008
    Messages:
    623
    Likes Received:
    210
    Location:
    Chesterton IN
    I want to thank you all for input. Once I get better after my shoulder surgery I will get to the beaches and try it. It will be awhile cause I do not want to screw it up and not be able to cast a line.

    To all good luck

    Braveheart
     
  12. William Wallace

    William Wallace Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2008
    Messages:
    623
    Likes Received:
    210
    Location:
    Chesterton IN
    I am getting better and have taken everyones input and decided to go get an Airflo 40+ intermediate. I already have the floating. I hope to see some of you out there soon. See my post for fishing on Thursday morning (Beach). You all have a great day.

    William
     
  13. herl

    herl Member

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2004
    Messages:
    867
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    the other washington
    Good choice! That's my favorite.
     
  14. Les Johnson

    Les Johnson Les Johnson

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2003
    Messages:
    1,590
    Likes Received:
    13
    Location:
    .Redmond, WA
    Floating line: Saltwater taper rated for distance. SA Salmon Steelhead Taper, Teeny Long Shot, Orivs Salmon/Steelhead line
    Intermediate line: Most of the clear intermediates will do the job. This is the line I use most of the time
    Sinking line: Integrated head, preferably with an intermediate running line.

    Eventually, you will want to have all three.
    Les Johnson
     
  15. papafsh

    papafsh Piscatorial predilection

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2002
    Messages:
    2,356
    Likes Received:
    131
    Location:
    Camano Island, WA, USA.
    Home Page:
    I wonder about just how much any line would disturb a saltwater fish. As anyone who fishes the salt knows, there is all kinds of junk floating freely around in saltwater, we spend a good amount of time picking it off our lines, afterall.
    With all that floatsam and jetsam already in the environment, I've never noticed the same "line shy" behavior, in salt water fish, as you expect to see in clear freshwater streams and rivers.

    Not saying Tom is wrong, but do any of our experienced saltwater experts have any advicethey could share on this subject?

    LB