What size rod to add?

Discussion in 'Saltwater' started by jonbackman, Mar 3, 2007.

  1. jonbackman

    jonbackman Member

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    Ok, I'm thinking I need to expand my rod selection, as I am currently limited to just one. I've been fishing a 6/7 wt from the beaches so far. Obviously, this is fine for searuns, res cohos and the like. I have been telling myself that I could hopefully handle a decent sized salmon on the same rod as well, but I am coming to realize that a long, drawn-out fight would only be harder on the fish. Anyway, with aspirations of chasing rockfish this summer, the upcoming humpy run, maybe some steelheading and trips to Mexico definitely in my future, what weight should I consider adding? 9wt? 10? I don't want something too big, but I also can't afford to own a rod of every individual size. Also, to go along with rod weight, what length might pair well? I'm not so concerned with exact brands or models, just size for now.
     
  2. gt

    gt Active Member

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    if you are serious about bigger more aggressive fish in the salt, you will eventually add a 10wt. it is pretty much a standard rod for saltwater fishing. anything from dorado in the sea of cortez to baby tarpon are all within range of this rod. when i travel, i take a 7, 8, 10, and 12 with me for salwater duty. while some folks like the lighter weight rods for stuff like bones, what you will more often than not encounter is WIND!!!!! you are also casting bigger and bushier flies so some rod beef is a welcome thing.

    and thanks for your appreciation of the time it takes to bring your fish to hand. lactic acid build up happens in fish just like you and me. head down to the finish line of the next full marathon in your area to see what it looks like in us humans.
     
  3. Jordan Simpson

    Jordan Simpson Active Member

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    If staying local, I'd maybe upgrade to a 9wt, but I use an 8 for steelhead/salmon from the beaches and rivers, while i use a 5/6 for cutties and the sort. If going after rockfish and salmon and steelhead all on the same rod, I'd go 9. But, if you plan on going to destinations that host Dorado, Roosters and the lik, you will probs want to go with a 10, considering fight, wind, fly size, etc.
    Just my two cents.
    PS, personally, I don't go too expensive with my saltgear, though you pay for what you get. The rod I use for my salmon/steelhead is my 8wt, and it is a very nice rod at an affordable price by the nice people at Temple Fork Outfitters.
     
  4. hendersonbaylocal

    hendersonbaylocal Member

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    9 if you are just going to fish here. Maybe a 10 if you plan to travel and fish some other species as some have already said. An 8 would be ok but will probably feel too similar to your 6/7.

    You would probably be fine with your current rod for pinks/silvers but would want that bigger rod for chums/kings.
     
  5. Porter

    Porter Active Member

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    based on your future as mentioned ........ 10
     
  6. Milt Roe

    Milt Roe Active Member

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    I personally don't see any reason to go over 8 wt. in the Sound if you are targeting cutts, pinks, coho, ot chums. Why do others feel that a heavier rod is desireable? Not dissing anyone, just wondered what the rationale is...
     
  7. Stonefish

    Stonefish Triploid, Humpy & Seaplane Hater

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    I think your choice depends on what you might fish for in Mexico. Are you thinking flats or bluewater fishing?
    Brian
     
  8. Porter

    Porter Active Member

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    reread the initial post...the whole post :) might make more sense :beer2:
     
  9. jonbackman

    jonbackman Member

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    Wow, this is why I like this site so much. Look at all this response in less than a day. Sounds like a 9 or 10 wt is in my future. I just need to decide the reality of how often I'll get to fish Mexico. When I do, my fishing will most likely be bluewater off the Pacific coast, anywhere between Mazatlan and P. Vallarta., possibly as far north as Cabo. If, based on using it down in Mexico, I go with the 10 wt, it wouldn't really feel too heavy around here? That's probably my main concern, because as I want to be adequately outfitted to fish down south, the majority of my fishing will certainly be done right here in the Northwest. Oh, and to add to my question a bit, I'd love to go after some of the available Tiger Muskies that our state hosts during the summer. I know one lake I'm looking into (no big secret spot) holds very big ones. Would I want the 10 for those guys? Thanks for all your input, time to go fishing for a bit.
     
  10. herl

    herl Member

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    With your current rod being a 6/7 it makes your next rod kind of tricky. Do you mostly fish a 6 or 7 wt. line on it?

    I believe your current rod is going to continue to be your go-to sound rod. It will not be too light for pinks or coho this fall. I would recommend an 8wt. for steelhead/salmon in the rivers around here but since you already have a 6/7, I don't know how different this will be.

    For Mexico, it definately sounds like you'll want a 10, but the only uses I can think of for a 10 wt. around here is if you are targeting Chinook in one of the few places you can do that, Chum salmon and Tiger Muskies! I vote for the 10 - just realize that you probably won't be using it a whole heck of a lot around here.
     
  11. gt

    gt Active Member

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    light rod folks always seem to think a 10wt is heavy!! what you will find in using it is far less false casting and the ability to shoot lots of line with big ugly bugs for aggressive take no prisonners saltwater battlers :D it's a very friendly rod weight with many applications right here in the PNWet. chinook to about 25# are within range and bigger fish, if you are consumptive fishing, as well.

    my rule of thumb is buy your gear once. that means spend what it takes and then take care of it for a lifetime. amortizing your investment over a life time takes care of the sticker shock.
     
  12. MauiJim

    MauiJim ka lawai'a

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    Your 6/7 wt is perfect for anything off the beaches here-- even if you hook into an 8-lb ocean coho this fall, it should handle it fine. A 7wt is my favorite rod for pinks as well... I landed over 30 from the beach this last run, using 5, 6, and 7wts. All worked well, but the 7 seemed a good match for these fish that are still strong in the salt.

    If you're punching line into the wind in Mexico or dropping heavy heads out at Neah Bay for rockfish, then a 9wt would be more suitable; otherwise, there's no reason to fish anything much bigger than a 6 or 7wt off of Puget Sound beaches (except for the odd chum in the winter).
     
  13. Stonefish

    Stonefish Triploid, Humpy & Seaplane Hater

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    A 10 wt is my favorite rod for fishing Baja. It will easily throw 30 ft T-14 heads. I've never used a 10 around the northwest, but I'm sure there are some king and chum applications for it.
    Good luck with your decision.
    Brian
     
  14. Richard E

    Richard E Active Member

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    A 9 weight will be big for your humpys, and be more than adequate to handle your rockfish. It will be a bit big for casting and fishing all day to steelhead, and will be on the absolute small side for Mexico.

    What you're looking for is a one size fits all, and that's tough. You're next rod should be a fast action 8 weight; it will handle competently (without blowing your shoulder and elbow while casting) nearly all of those conditions you listed, with the exception of Mexico. You'll need a second stick. With that, like Stonefish said, a 10 weight is minimum.

    Check out TFO or Redington rods. They both offer excellent rods with great service and warranties. You can buy two TFO rods, an 8 wt. and 10 wt., for $200 retail, that cast well!! And both offer unconditional lifetime warranties. Those are 2 piece sticks. If you want travel rods (4 piece, which I advise), that will set you back another $100 rods for 2 rods.
     
  15. Porter

    Porter Active Member

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    I think, because of what you stated, the ten weight (maybe a TFO or Redington) would be the best option. The Redington CPS is a very nice rod...and so are the TFO's ...maybe a TFO Teeny or Ticr rod for what you are looking for. I think Richard had it right but if you can only afford one and you have all these plans...the one to help cover all those bases is the TEN. You need some $$$ for that reel too :thumb: Good Luck