What weight line?

Discussion in 'Saltwater' started by jonbackman, Dec 30, 2006.

  1. jonbackman

    jonbackman Member

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    Hey guys.

    I've been using some old floating line that I've had since I was a kid for all of my saltwater beach endeavors so far. However, it's time for me to upgrade to some saltwater line. My question is this, if my rod is labeled as a 6-7 weight, should I get 6 wt line, 7 wt line, or does it really matter? I primarily fish area beaches for SRC's and whatever salmon are available, just like everyone else. Also, I prefer a full floating line. I'm not so much interested in a specific brand of line, I'm just wondering if the difference between 6 and 7 weight line matters at all in my situation. Thanks!
     
  2. Anil

    Anil Active Member

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    When double taper lines were more popular, rods like yours were labeled for both double taper lines and weight forward lines. A rod that is designated a 6/7 is rated for a six weight double taper and seven weight, weight forward line. Both lines will weight the same in the front half, but since a weight forward will taper down into lighter running line, the double taper line will be much heavier if you ‘carry’ a lot of line in the air. Like rods built today, this number is the (very educated) opinion of the rod designer and is a good guideline. You may find you like a line weight heavier or lighter than what is recommended. If you are unsure, go to a shop where you can try a few line weights.
    Good floating lines for beach fishing are generally models that have a short front taper which will facilitate turnover in the wind. My favorite standard weight forward line for this is the Rio ‘Clouser’ line. Many other good choices are available from a variety of brands.
    Anil
     
  3. jonbackman

    jonbackman Member

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    Anil,
    thanks for that helpful and informative response. You guys around here are really knowledgeable, and I can't say how much more confident it has made me as I've begun wading into the world of beach fly fishing. I'll take your advice.
     
  4. Richard E

    Richard E Active Member

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    Anil gave you some great feedback.

    What I also live about the shorter head lines for the beach is that they help you load the rod more quickly, with less line out of the end of the rod, than say my 'favorite' long belly lines. The significance? It reduces the likelihood of 'ticking' your fly on the beach on backcasts. :thumb:
     
  5. D3Smartie

    D3Smartie Active Member

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    jon- i have seen a lot of problems with the Clouser line and now prefer the Outbound for all my beach fishing. The outbound is basically a shooting head with running line. It is a "line-and-a-half" type line so see how it matches your rod. I really like a 7wt TCR or 6wt Xi2 with an Outbound of the same weight for the beaches depending on my targeted species.
     
  6. Don Freeman

    Don Freeman Free Man

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    Clouser line?


    I'm curious what problems you've had with the clouser, compared to the Outbound. I use the lines, but continue to sing the blues about the running line. It's like the little girl in the poem. "When it's good, it's very very good". I stretch the line use, a basket, clean and dress the line religiously, but still get more tangles than I do with a classic sinking line. It's frustrating to go from smooth 80' casts to picking birds' nests so frequently.

    So, I'm wondering what your experience with the Clouser Line has been compared to the Outbound, as I've been considering one.
     
  7. Jordan Simpson

    Jordan Simpson Active Member

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    Cortland makes excellent fly line, actually it is one of my favourites to use, along with Scientific Anglers. Both make good fly lines, but can be pricey if you start to get specific (like, certain lines for certain conditions and multiple rods and reels). My favourite fly line for the salt (due to the fact that it is inexpensive, very managable and floats and casts well) is the Cortland Fairplay trout line. It should be a peachy colour, so it's not too bright that it will spook fish but not too dark that you can't see it on the water. It retails for around $36 and I believe it is only 80feet, instead of the usuall 90.

    -Tight Lines
     
  8. salt dog

    salt dog card shark

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    I've been fishing a 6wt Outbound intermediate line since May and really like it, though it seems to tangle even more during the sub-40's F temps we've been having in December.

    Recently the welded loop popped at the weld. The line didn't break, the loop just came apart while playing a small fish, probably a 13" Coho. RIO stands behind their products and a replacement is waiting for me to pick up at the shop, but I was wondering if anyone else has experienced this?
     
  9. martyg

    martyg Active Member

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    I've been playing with different lines over the years for conditions that are similar - windy, big and the necessity to deliver long casts all day long with a minimum of false casting.

    My perfect arrow is definately RIO's integrated shooting heads. Get 40' of line out, get some massive line speed and let'er rip.