What works?

Discussion in 'Stillwater' started by fly-adventures, Nov 10, 2013.

  1. GAT

    GAT Dumbfounded

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2012
    Messages:
    9,221
    Likes Received:
    7,844
    Location:
    Willamette Valley, OR
    I'd be in big trouble without my fast, full sinking line. I fish deep lakes and during the cold weather, the trout hug the bottom.

    I use three lines for stillwaters and doubt if that will ever change. I catch fish so the approach works for me. I always carry a floating, a clear intermediate sinking and a full fast sinking line.

    I'm not keen on the "bobber fishing" (vertical) and prefer using sinking lines instead. However, if push comes to shove, I can and will switch to a dry line, weighted patterns and very long leaders.

    Probably the move valuable tool I use for flyfishing stillwaters is my portable depth/fish finder. The screen indicates the depth where the trout are holding and this information is instrumental in my line choice. About this time of year, the fish normally hold within a foot or so of the bottom of the lake. ... but no always. That's where the depth/fish finder is so danged handy. I may not catch the fish I mark but at least I know the depth they are holding so I can choose my line and presentation accordingly.
     
    Jim Wallace likes this.
  2. Starman77

    Starman77 Active Member

    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2004
    Messages:
    342
    Likes Received:
    589
    Location:
    Kent, WA, USA.
    I also recommend adding a full sinking line to your arsenal. In our eastern WA lakes, the trout are often way down deep, like 20 to 30 feet deep. I use a RIO Deep 7 full sinking line to get down that deep. You could get down that deep with a floating line and really long leader, but it is difficult to cast that kind of setup.

    Rex
     
  3. Irafly

    Irafly Indi "Ira" Jones

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2003
    Messages:
    6,578
    Likes Received:
    4,885
    Location:
    Everett, Washington, USA.
    Yeah, in this case there isn't much of a cast, but I have been experimenting with a switch rod now and I'll be honest I can haul it out there fairly far with long leaders now, which allows me to play around with my retrieve while still presenting my fly vertically within a specific zone, versus using a sinking line and taking it out of a zone.
     
  4. ryfly

    ryfly Addicted to flyfishing

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2004
    Messages:
    473
    Likes Received:
    123
    Location:
    Snoqualmie, WA
    I'm a big fan of the Dupont Stimmie. Light, throw, paddle away like crazy, and reap the benefits.
     
  5. Red Arch

    Red Arch Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2011
    Messages:
    496
    Likes Received:
    202
    Location:
    Lower Mainland or Interior of BC
    Just a quick two cents.

    My favourite lines to use right now are a intermediate sink and a type 3. The type 3 was used with a weighted pumpkinhead in around 6-9 feet of water on a fast hand twist. I usually always use hangs in there but sometimes the straight twist is what gets the fish. Biggest fish I caught in a lake I had just finished a pause, went to hand twist and hit a solid wall with a nice 6-8 pounder on.
    This technique works well on brookies to except they like speed variances (like 4 fast strips 4 slow).

    As for the intermediate I use it in shallower lakes to avoid hitting bottom. Same technique. Beauty with a hand twist is you can go fast (to a point) or really slowly.

    Also here are two visuals from a lecture regarding winter and Turnover. Turn over.jpg Fish distribution.jpg
     
    Mark Kraniger and ryfly like this.
  6. GAT

    GAT Dumbfounded

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2012
    Messages:
    9,221
    Likes Received:
    7,844
    Location:
    Willamette Valley, OR
    I've tried many times but my full fast sinking line won't make it through ice .... guess it isn't heavy enough :)
     
    tonemike likes this.
  7. Jim Wallace

    Jim Wallace Smells like low tide.

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2004
    Messages:
    6,452
    Likes Received:
    1,223
    Location:
    Cranberry Country...a glorified coastal swamp!
    You must not be using the new Winter line. Burns right down thru the ice, and even keeps your rod's guides ice-free.;) Problem with the Winter line, is that the battery runs down after a while, and then you have to find some place to plug it in.:D They come in standard gages: 10, 12, and 14.
    Need a two-hander to throw 'em.
     
    GAT and ryfly like this.
  8. Wayne Kohan

    Wayne Kohan fish-ician

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2004
    Messages:
    1,241
    Likes Received:
    325
    Location:
    TriCities, WA
    Jim, I found a solution to this issue, add one of these to your pontoon or pram, you can have your coffee maker with you too:
    http://www.amazon.com/Coleman-Powermate-Portable-Generator-PMA525500/dp/B000BYI6SI

    Can run your space heater and trolling motor and depth finders as well.

    Wayne