What's the difference...?

GAT

Dumbfounded
#3
Seriously, I don't have any idea what the difference is. The ones I tie with a little modification works for me. I use coyote fur or natural buck tail for the wing instead of a quill. I also tie on a red tail. It's, of course, easier to tie and catches trout. Less is more.
 

Big E

Active Member
#4
The two were designed on different coasts for different species. The original Muddler tied by Don Gapen in the 30s looks nothing like a Rolled Muddler. The Muddler was tied specifically by Don to target brookies in Ontario while Tom Murray designed the Rolled Muddler (like in the 70 or 80s) for SRC in BC.

The Muddler uses turkey and squirrel while the Roller Muddler uses Mallard. Both share a deer hair head, which is spun and seems to be packed more tightly over the ages.
 
#5
Tom Murray's Rolled Muddler is a beach stickleback imitation for SRC. One of the distinguishing features of the Rolled Muddler, in addition to the use of mallard instead of turkey as already mentioned, is the red thread which shows behind the head. Here is a close up photo of one of my RM illustrating this feature.
The head is generally "arrow" shaped and the wing should be "rolled".
IMG_1327.jpg
Jack
 

Preston

Active Member
#6
Personally, I don't see much resemblance between Murray's Rolled Muddler and a stickleback, it still looks more like a sculpin imitation to me. For the heads on mine, I use the same technique that Harry Lemire used for his Thompson River Caddis which involves spinning deer hair into a dubbing loop, partially trimming it then winding it onto the hook before final trimming; works well. IMG_0200.JPG
 
#7
Personally, I don't see much resemblance between Murray's Rolled Muddler and a stickleback, it still looks more like a sculpin imitation to me. For the heads on mine, I use the same technique that Harry Lemire used for his Thompson River Caddis which involves spinning deer hair into a dubbing loop, partially trimming it then winding it onto the hook before final trimming; works well. View attachment 29622
Preston, there certainly is a resemblance to the sculpin and who knows what the cutthroat is thinking when he sees it????
This from Art Lingren:
Jack
IMG_1332.jpg
 

Jim Darden

Active Member
#9
Maybe it don't look pretty but it is definitely a go to SRC fly. I got clued into it by the Ospreys in joint fishing trips to the sun shine coast and it became one of my two favorite flys for SRC. Later on I found out it also works for trout in lakes and streams.....wouldn't be without it!
 

Big E

Active Member
#11
Its a technique. When tying in this manner, a clump of mallard fibers will be pulled off. "Rolling" them between your fingers will separate the barbules and then they are tied on the hook.

Over in the UK, rolled mallard was also a technique but usually meant that the fibers were rolled around the hook using the thread, much like spinning deer, and used extensively on wets.
 
#12
Its a technique. When tying in this manner, a clump of mallard fibers will be pulled off. "Rolling" them between your fingers will separate the barbules and then they are tied on the hook.

Over in the UK, rolled mallard was also a technique but usually meant that the fibers were rolled around the hook using the thread, much like spinning deer, and used extensively on wets.
OK - I'm going to look into that a bit
I really like the fly for SRC
Thank you