World's biggest SRC

Discussion in 'Saltwater' started by SaltyTippet, Oct 27, 2017.

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  1. Ian Horning

    Ian Horning Active Member

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    Holy cow, minimum 3" diameter? That's wild
     
  2. rotato

    rotato Active Member

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    At least you can release from a beach seine. The gill nets kill without mercy.
    Six years ago the commercial fleet had a monster day up near Mukletio. We actually plugged all the canneries and they shut us down. As we were on a seiner we released a few steelhead but did not see any cutts. We were setting in deeper water and possibly outside usual cutthroat environ.
    Not defending the commercial harvest just relaying the possibility of identifying and releasing non pink fish.

    I'm still looking for the 20 incher
    Does sea lice actually have an affect on growth?
    Everyone we encountered Sunday had a back full
    What about the rezzie impact on forage?
     
  3. Chucker

    Chucker Active Member

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    For juvenile fish, sea lice undoubtedly have an impact on growth, and cause significant mortality - there's lots of stuff from BC on this in regard to pinks, all of which is also applicable to SRC.

    For larger fish, the data just isn't there, or at least I am not aware of it. However, it's hard to think of a scenario where having up to a hundred parasites on your skin doesn't have an effect. I have seen a handful of SRC over the years that have had significant skin damage caused by sea lice, and once that happens and disease sets in, there are going to be consequences for those fish.

    Interesting question about whether ressies impact forage. My feeling is that there are just not enough of them to make a dent, but I have no actual data to back that up.
     
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  4. Bryce Levin

    Bryce Levin Active Member

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    This was my high school janitor. I remember him showing me this picture and believe he thought it was a sockeye, as that is what he was fishing for. Man it makes me cringe...
     
  5. Smalma

    Smalma Active Member

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    Chucker -
    Not sure that the information from BC on the interactions between sea lice and pinks is applicable to the south Sound cutthroat. First the sea lice affecting the pinks up north is a different critter than found on the PS cutthroat. In addition the cutthroat smolts are much larger (typically 6 to 8 inches long) than the pinks (1 1/2 inches). If for some reason there were usually high mortalities on the cutthroat smolts the first few month of the marine residency the effect would be an over all reduction in the numbers of fish but the age structure (ratios) of the older fish would remain much the same. Killing half of the smolts would result in seeing half as many of the older cutthroat but the portion of the adult population over say 18 inches would remain more or less constant.

    The question of the resident coho/coho smolts on the cutthroat is an interesting one. It appears that there is a significant special separation between the young coho and the cutthroat; the cutthroat are predominately near shore fish and the coho mostly deep water fish with the cutthroat typically a more generalist feeder.

    Curt
     
  6. SaltyTippet

    SaltyTippet Be the beach

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    So.... a lake-born pig like the one in the photo gets disoriented by a high water event and ends up in an outflow stream that has access to the salt.... the fish then enters an estuary area... is there any chance this fish survives the transition?

    Simply put: Can an adfluvial coastal cutthroat in an adult stage "transform" into an SRC having spent its entire life in freshwater?
     
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  7. SaltyTippet

    SaltyTippet Be the beach

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    Wha? Thats awesome....
     
  8. SaltyTippet

    SaltyTippet Be the beach

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    Okay be honest.... how many people googled Harstene Island after this post? I did.
     
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  9. SaltyTippet

    SaltyTippet Be the beach

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    Very true. Very scary. Solid point.
     
  10. seattlee

    seattlee Active Member

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    I tend to agree with Chucker that sea lice have to negatively impact SRC size. sea lice can't be good for growth right? A dozen parasites on an animal (most Area 10 SRC I catch have 10 or more sea lice) must take some nutrients from the animal.

    I also wonder how having many parasites on an SRC impacts their hunting speed/ability since their sleek form is interrupted with all these bumps on their backs AND it seems some sea lice positions impinge on the fins of the fish.
     
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  11. Runejl

    Runejl Josh

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    Ha ha, still always thinking like an engineer.
     
  12. Stonefish

    Stonefish Triploid, Humpy & Seaplane Hater

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    That could happen, but not likely in system like Lake Washington or Sammamish.

    Not sure of the answer to your second question.

    Does anyone know how long those copepods stay attached once a fish heads to freshwater to spawn?

    Thanks,
    SF
     
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  13. Smalma

    Smalma Active Member

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    SF -
    Over the years I have caught quite a few sea-runs in the tidally influenced sections of the "S" rivers and have never seen a single of those copepods on those fish caught. Conversely have seen the type of sea lice normally associate with salmon on bull trout and steelhead as much as 75 miles upstream of the river's mouths. Based on those observations I would say not long.

    Curt
     
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  14. mtskibum16

    mtskibum16 Active Member

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    And that's why I generally don't name drop online (not that there were specifics in this case). Most people that defend it, only do so because they don't fish a given spot anymore or don't fish it often.
     
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  15. Gyrfalcon2015

    Gyrfalcon2015 Wild Trout forever

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    Making the assumption that sea lice act like fatal Lampreys, is a stretch, I believe. Nature is full of parasites and many are along for the ride, and or symbiotic. I had a Parasitology class in college that covered many of these things, and the falsities. Interesting stuff.
    Sometimes logic in nature is odd.

    Some types of parasites are bad, sure. But fish have alot of critters that use the fish as a medium. As kids, we caught suckers that had visible worms in their fins-perhaps a larval form such as the mussels.

    Many here are familiar with the freshwater mussels we have in the coastal rivers? They use fish as a means to be spread around rivers. Very important. Watch and see if a fish population crashes, so will the clams.
    Introduced, non-native , sea lice, is probably another thing, as would be fish that are stuck, stagnant in enlcosed net pens. Stuff can spread in an environment without refreshing. There is a reason we do laundry often.
    590h.jpg


    I can think of one thing that would be bad for the fish, man scraping all the sea lice off. They evolved for a reason, and as long as a population of fish is pretty strong-like the Puget Sound/Hood Canal SRC's seem to be, and we do not have dead/starving fish showing up with a hundred sea lice on them, I'd tend to go with the fact they are not causing much harm or any substantial harm.

    My 2 cents
     
    Last edited: Oct 31, 2017
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