Fly Fishing Photo Gallery

  1. Search

    Recent Photos
    1 day  7 days  14 days

  1. Statistics
    Users 79,739
    Photos 44,264
    Comments 69,420
    Views 30,942,283

  1. Posting Calendar
    « July 2014
    SunMon TueWed ThuFri Sat
      12345
    6789101112
    13141516171819
    20212223242526
    2728293031  


  1. Random - Gallery

    1-17-09_res.jpg

    [ Member Galleries ]



    TG275_02.jpg

    [ Member Galleries ]



    sholtonbrookieskin.jpg

    [ Member Galleries ]


    · more ·


 
  1. Home > Member Galleries > driftboatdan > Slide Show


    prev
    sculpins_001
    next

    View Larger Image


    sculpins_001



    3x long streamer hook size 4 or 2
    Dumbell eyes-red
    olive sparkle antron dubbing
    black schlappen palmered
    red copper wire rib
    Sparkly stuff of your choice
    Olive and brown wool
    natural barred bunny



    Essentially a wool head matuka, with flash and eyes.


    -DBD


    <<
    Pants_and_fish_038.jpg
    rainbowrelease.WMV
    sculpins_001.jpg
    ski_035.jpg
    Crump_and_Barrett.jpg
    >>

    1. driftboatdan

      See all User Photos

      Registered: February 2004
      Location: Levelok AK (Previosly B-ham)
      Posts: 32
      • Pin It
      ssssssssss
      Linked Thumb: 
      Linked Medium: 
      Medium Image: 
      Date: 3-3-06
      Views: 1,902




  1. Lostinwater
    Those would slay on Whatcom creek! Nice ties dan
    #1 3-3-06 8:31am

    driftboatdan
    Thanks Andrew, I miss that place...heard you had a nice float the other day.
    #2 3-3-06 8:36am

    Dan Soltau
    nicely done, you should take a little time a spin some deer hair bugs, wool is nuetral densitie material meaning it doesnt snk but obsorbs water and gets very heavy. Deer hair is waterproof and will sink like a rock if you put some weight into the fly.
    #3 3-3-06 8:30pm

    Curtis
    sweet!!
    #4 3-3-06 10:50pm

    Zen Piscator

    Supporting wild steelhead, gravel to gravel.
    Sweet ass fly man. In my experince wool sinks much better than deer hair with added wieght because it is not boyant, plus i think it looks better and is easier to tie with.
    #5 3-4-06 1:14am

    driftboatdan
    I'm not really sure about the deer hair comment, it doesn't make sence to me. Wool may be neutral density, but deer hair is actually bouyant. I know that once deer hair is soaked it will sink, but upon casting the hollow hairs empty of water, and once again you have a bouyant fly. Deer hair does leave a nice bubble trail, so I do fish with those as well.
    #6 3-4-06 3:31am

    Dan Soltau
    o, i have done extensive testing on this subject, I used to be the type of person who tied all the time and it just so happened that they only flies i tied outside of comercial were streamers. So when I went to montana and arkansas I didnt really want ot nymph, i just fished 4-6"sculpins(deer hair and wool), and crawdad buggers even though I I thought I would have caught many more if I simply would have nymphed. I have done hours of product testing for rio in the past year on their different ways to get a flie deep fast in decent current without causing hell to cast. I looked at many different books and I found wool head patterns probably 75% of the time in the sculpin sections. On a trip to montana 4 years ago I heard about a man named kelly galloup who was supposedly turning the only big fish caught anymore on the au sable employing his streamers tactacs. I eventually got his book as well and tested all these ways of sculpin fishing and after I found out how to correctively tie all these sculpins I set out to fish the madison river for a total of eight times that took place from march to october, excluding the best streamer time iin the whole year. I found fishing wool patterrns didnt change my confidence in fishing them at first, but I was certainly catch more fish with deer hair patterns. I guess its cause I thought that the fish I would catch on a wol head sculpin would be huge, but I caught much fewer total fish and the big one never came, in fact nothing I caught nothing that was over 20". I caught more fish on a crawfish bugger than any other tactic and they averaged out to be around 17" with the biggest a 23" rainbow near lyons bridge. I used a bass fisherman type jig technique with a heavily wieghted pattern, short leaders, and a type 8 tip. Second in numbers was the partially weighted spun deer hair sculpin around 4-6 inches in mostly any color with a light/dark cotrast on it, the more extreme the bigger the fish with a type 7 line or or 15+ ft tip. The average on the suclpin fish was a solid 20", I caught more 18" rainbows than you would believe which were a close second to an astounding amount of browns. I am confident over this time there were 30" fish hooked multiple times thought the biggest was a 26" brown on the madison near reynolds pass and a 25 inch cutt on the yellowstone near buffalo ford in august, maybe the sweetest fishing experirence I have had(All on big yellow/green/chartuese patterns. Woolhead patterns did catch fish, and a good amount but they also resulted tangles, injuries(not me), and tiring cast. It dint really bother me but after looking at my notes overall I dont even carry wolhead patterns, I carry a dozen crawdad buggers in ther same color and 2 sculpins in a multitude of colors. Because I caught more fish and if it wasnt as tiring or troublesome as deer hair why would I still employ it, regardless of numbers.I also did a little testing on the yakima, I caught WAY more fish on the crawdad tactic than on a any sculpin pattern, actualy that is all I fish over there because of how effective it is. Wool does not get down as fast in fast water as weighted deer hair and cast like hell compared to deer hair, plus it takes forever to dry leaving hooks and wire rusted and damaging the fly. Just my 2 cents, no hard words
    *I also carried a 5 wieght to fish the spinner falls which are gaining on sculpins in my favorite list.
    #7 3-4-06 8:27am

    driftboatdan
    um ok.
    #8 3-6-06 3:06am

    Zen Piscator

    Supporting wild steelhead, gravel to gravel.
    Haha...that was a waste of time. You should send those to me so they don't pollute your box.
    #9 3-26-06 8:25am

    kamishak steve
    madison angler:


    apparently you didn't get the memo. fly doesn't matter that much. unless your the guys selling them. come to alaska, and you'll soon realize that dogshit glued to a hook, if wiggled in the right place, works as effectively as the deer hair sculpin you spent too much o fyour life researching. top fly in AK last year: bunny strip super glued to a hook - save your thread...
    #10 1-31-07 7:12pm

    kamishak steve
    p.s. DBD - those sculpins, despite their handicap of having woolheads, will catch the bejesus out of fish.
    #11 1-31-07 7:13pm

    Dan Soltau
    Well, shit guys I didnt say the flies were in any way bad, but I recomended another way of tying the same fly, and you can catch jjust as many fish or more if you fish it unweighted with a sinking line, plus your arm isnt tired at all, every take is visual as the fly remains un in the water column. So I see no benefit of heavy flies at this point. It is like casting a big dry fly, the action is much better in the water, and casting is quick and fluent. And we are not all in alsaka where the fish will eat anything any time, I have found fih can be very selective color-wise and how you retreive it.
    #12 2-1-07 12:52am




Photo Sharing Gallery by PhotoPost
Copyright © 2012 All Enthusiast, Inc.