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    1. ceviche

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      Registered: February 2003
      Location: Shoreline, Washington, U.S.A.
      Posts: 2,312
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      Date: 11-21-06
      Views: 1,064
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    ceviche
    3x4 set of Careys. The first column are soft-tailed olive and peacock Carey Specials. The second column are olive Self-bodied Careys. The third and fourth columns are the same, except they're tied using undyed pheasant rump hackle. These may not be aesthetically "perfect," but they sure catch the trout!
    #1 11-21-06 11:22pm

    ceviche
    Soft-Tailed Carey Special recipe:
    Materials are listed in order of initial tying onto the hook.


    Hook: Size 10, 1X strong, 3X long hook. Tiemco 5263 or Dai-Riki #710


    Thread: 6/0 Black


    Ribbing: Copper wire, brassie-size. Wapsi Ultra Wire.
    This gauge wire is probably a little heavier than what passes for as medium. I prefer this gauge of wire, because it doesn’t break as easily as the lighter stuff. Wapsi Ultra Wire seems softer and less brittle than other brands. This is to reinforce the body of the fly. The additional shine of the copper, though muted, adds just a touch of flash without the risk of becoming “spooky.”


    Tail: Pheasant rump hackle, the webby fibers.
    The marabou-like webby tufts from right below the “good” hackle tip fibers. Select by pinching and stripping off only the longest fibers. You are constructing a short tail that is about hook gap length. Considering that you will probably have to take four pinches to gather all the long webby fibers off of a single feather, you will have to exercise a fair degree of dexterity so you don’t lose any fibers while collecting more. With practice, you will be able to figure out how to best do this.


    Body: Peacock herl.
    One can form the body two or three basic ways. The first is done by taking a single herl strand, securing the butt-end, advancing the thread, and wrapping forward the herl until it runs out. Repeat until about ½ hook gap from the eye. One can also use multiple strands of herl at the same time and advance them forward in the same manner as the single strand method. As an alternative method to these, one can use one or more strands of herl and, after securing the butt end(s) to the hook shank, wrap the herl around the tying thread before forming the body. You are basically forming a herl rope and forming the body in this manner. The advantage to this method is additional durability of the body. The copper ribbing makes the fly even more durable.


    Hackle: Pheasant rump hackle.
    In selecting the right size of feather, measure the length of the hackle fibers against the hook. The longest fibers need to be at least the same length as the overall length of the hook and not more than a hook gap longer. This will yield an aesthetic looking finished hackle. Also, from experience, trout seem to prefer slightly longer than slightly shorter hackle length. Measure against overall hook length.
    This hackle came from the same feather you stripped for the tail fibers. We hope you haven’t mislaid it already. I try to wrap on all of the hackle, using one of those parachute hackle pliers with the swiveling tip. This is the only tool that will allow you to do this. Once you’ve initially secured the hackle with three wraps of thread, remove the hackle pliers. Then take the thread and weave it through the hackle fibers to the back of the hackle and then back to the front of the hackle. Do this a few more times to bind the hackle quill against the hook and to reinforce the hackle. Don’t you hate it when the hackle breaks and hangs dangling from your fly? I do to. This way, you might lose a couple of hackle fibers to fish--but never the whole hackle all at once.


    Whip finish and use nail polish to seal everything into place.
    #2 1-14-07 2:24am

    ceviche
    The Self-bodied Carey


    Materials are listed in order of initial tying onto the hook.


    Hook: Size 10, 1X strong, 3X long hook. Tiemco 5263 or Dai-Riki #710


    Thread: 6/0 Black


    Ribbing: Copper wire, brassie-size. Wapsi Ultra Wire.
    This gauge wire is probably a little heavier than what passes for as medium. I prefer this gauge of wire, because it doesn’t break as easily as the lighter stuff. Wapsi Ultra Wire seems softer and less brittle than other brands. This is to reinforce the body of the fly. The additional shine of the copper, though muted, adds just a touch of flash without the risk of becoming “spooky.”


    Tail and body: Pheasant rump hackle.
    Select a rump hackle that looks to be a touch smaller than you would select for the fly’s hackle—that is, hackle with fibers shorter than the hook’s length. You don’t want to use up feathers you otherwise should save for your fly’s hackle. Also, if the fly is to be of natural, un-dyed color, pick a rump feather that has that iridescent blue-ish cast to it. Natural iridescence is a valuable attribute. Peacock herl is another example of natural iridescence.
    The trick with this Carey variation is similar to how one forms the tail and body of a pheasant tail nymph. You have to capture the hackle tip with two turns of thread and then start pulling the feather through, until you have a tail formed that is about a hook gap in length. Cinch down the thread and add a third turn for safety. Advance the thread forward to about a hook gap length from the eye. Twisting the hackle clockwise a little, start wrapping the hook shank with this feather. Some fibers can and might spring free, sticking out a bit. That’s okay. It gives the impression of legs and looks buggy. Continue wrapping forward. You will probably find yourself into those webby, marabou-looking fibers. Feel free to include a little of that section of quill, because you should be about done forming the body of the fly. Bring your thread over and bind down the end of the quill. The quill might be a tad thick here, but no worry. Wrap it down.
    It is here that you will be ribbing and reinforcing the body with the copper wire.


    Hackle: Pheasant rump hackle.
    In selecting the right size of feather, measure the length of the hackle fibers against the hook. The longest fibers need to be at least the same length as the overall length of the hook and not more than a hook gap longer. This will yield an aesthetic looking finished hackle. Also, from experience, trout seem to prefer slightly longer than slightly shorter hackle length. Measure against overall hook length.
    Where the thick quill end and the copper wire were wrapped down with thread should have formed a thick bunch. This is where the hackle will be secured and then wound forward. The thick part will form a foundation that will help keep the finished hackle splayed out a bit, causing the fly to breathe a little when stripped through the water.
    I try to wrap on all of the hackle, using one of those parachute hackle pliers with the swiveling tip. This is the only tool that will allow you to do this. Once you’ve initially secured the hackle with three wraps of thread, remove the hackle pliers. Then take the thread and weave it through the hackle fibers to the back of the hackle and then back to the front of the hackle. Do this a few more times to bind the hackle quill against the hook and to reinforce the hackle. Don’t you hate it when the hackle breaks and hangs dangling from your fly? I do to. This way, you might lose a couple of hackle fibers to fish--but never the whole hackle all at once.


    Whip finish and use nail polish to seal everything into place.
    #3 1-14-07 2:25am


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