Elwha River

Old Man

Just an Old Man
#16
Silly question time. What happens to the Native trout in the higher elevations that people used to go fish for. Will they think that they are Steelhead and go out with the Smolt's. Or will they stay in the high reaches of the river.
 

JE

Active Member
#17
Silly question time. What happens to the Native trout in the higher elevations that people used to go fish for. Will they think that they are Steelhead and go out with the Smolt's. Or will they stay in the high reaches of the river.
There's a whole new world out there for the descendants of Elwha steelhead that have been trapped all these years behind the dams!
 
#20
Here's a link to some additional (and I think better) video of the last blast:


Disregard the "Sorry"; just click on "Watch on Vimeo" and go from there. I tried it and it works......
 
#24
Built as part of a deal with the tribe if they would not fish for five years. Allow the natives first shot at spawn. Finished before the dams were taken out. Tribe was all set to start planting C.C. fish the next year. Took the threat of a law suit to get them to see reason.
 

P.Dieter

Just Another Bubba
#27
My daughter has spent a couple weeks up there this summer on an internship with the NOAA fisheries science lab. Seined up some wild kings below Glines and recorded all sorts of fishies and invertebrates moving around.
 
#28
Sand lance and surf smelt spawn high up on the intertidal portions of the beaches. They deposit their eggs among the very small pebbles found on the upper reaches of the beach. Because those eggs are so high on the beach they are exposed for extended periods of time as the tide is out. Those eggs are vulnerable to being dried out. Having a sediments mixed in with those spawning pebbles helps to retain the moisture the eggs need to develop and successfully hatch. When one thinks about it is amazing how the various fish found in the area have adapted to natural processes of the area and each species carving out special niches in those dynamic processes.

BTW -
The source of those critical sediments typically are inputted from eroding bluffs or river sediments. That is way the hardening of Puget Sound beaches and bluffs with rip-rap etc. has such negative impacts on the forage fish base of the region.

curt
So what is the "benefit" that these species get by laying their eggs so far up the intertidal? Refuge from mechanical disturbance from waves and refuge from predation? Something must be worth the trade off.
 
#29
In my little dream world, I believe that it would be nice to have one (1) wild river, where man's interface with nature is limited so that we could leave some of nature for the next generations. No fishing, No rafting, no mining, not even camping. No hiking trails for folks to litter with their modern day junk. Just keep you sorry arse out!

I know that greed and immediate gratification will not allow this, but it would be nice......
 

Beachmen

Active Member
#30
i would love to see it become a catch and release only fishery for trout. and keep the targeting of salmon and steelhead closed through the next 10 years. let the strains come back and try to keep the hatchery fish to the least possible. it would be cool to see if there kings can get back to their historical size. just let nature do its thing.