Are overweight lines getting out of control?

Rob Allen

Active Member
#91
You still haven’t watched the video, have you?

I think i did when this thread first came up.. it's irrelevant though. A 5 wt rod iscacrod that throws a 5 wt line and a 5 wt line has bern fully defined by set number of grains.
Any rod that requires more graing than perscribed is by definition not a 5.


Edit.. ok I watched it.

1. If you cannot arialize 60 feet of line with extreme ease you are not a goid caster
2. Heavier lines were designed to cheat the learning curve

3. Heavier lines are designed to perform tasks that the rods they are meant to go on are not designed to do.

The size of the fish you are chasing is irrelevant. If you are fishing a aex dungeon on the Madison for your rods sake you need a 7 or 8 wt. Not a line that cam carry it put on your 5 wt.
His entire premise there is wrong
.
Also if you cannot cast DT close to 90 feet you aren't a great caster
His whole premise is that these lines are designed so that the least common denominator can fish. Beyond what he deserves.
Thats not progress it's failing to teach people how to cast.
 
Last edited:
#92
I think i did when this thread first came up.. it's irrelevant though. A 5 wt rod iscacrod that throws a 5 wt line and a 5 wt line has bern fully defined by set number of grains.
Any rod that requires more graing than perscribed is by definition not a 5.
Every 10 additional feet of line you carry in the air, even with the older lines, is one additional weight. So if you are carrying 50 feet of line in the air with a standard AFTMA 5 weight, you are casting a 7wt heavy line.
 

Wyobee

Active Member
#93
Its a good video, thanks Matt. It makes sense of the need for the difference in weight distribution and tapers for distance and large flies.

I never really thought of it this way before but a big bushy fly has a ton of wind resistance and to cast against the wind the advice has always been to go up one line wt.
 

Rob Allen

Active Member
#94
Every 10 additional feet of line you carry in the air, even with the older lines, is one additional weight. So if you are carrying 50 feet of line in the air with a standard AFTMA 5 weight, you are casting a 7wt heavy line.
Yes thats true but throwing a fly that fits the design of the rod.
 

Rob Allen

Active Member
#95
Its a good video, thanks Matt. It makes sense of the need for the difference in weight distribution and tapers for distance and large flies.

I never really thought of it this way before but a big bushy fly has a ton of wind resistance and to cast against the wind the advice has always been to go up one line wt.
So you do the proper thing and use a heavier rod.
 
#96
Yes thats true but throwing a fly that fits the design of the rod.
Rob. Listen. There is not, and I don’t think there has been (at least since the development of plastic lines), a line whose total head weight matches the AFTMA standard. It only covers the first 30 feet. It was never intended to be the standard for the entire head of the line.
 

Rob Allen

Active Member
#97
Rob. Listen. There is not, and I don’t think there has been (at least since the development of plastic lines), a line whose total head weight matches the AFTMA standard. It only covers the first 30 feet. It was never intended to be the standard for the entire head of the line.
Yes but now people are abusing their rods as a result and rods are getting worse and angler skill is dropping fast
 
Yes but now people are abusing their rods as a result and rods are getting worse and angler skill is dropping fast
Rob, how is it possible for you to make so many ridiculous comments that literally have little to no basis in truth? All you need to say is nothing, and you could learn the reason for how line weights are labeled today versus the past. If you don’t know why things are the way they are, you don’t need to make up nonsense.

How can someone “abuse” their rod if it is performing the way they want it to?
 
7 pages of BS by the 2 resident experts. Buy a line that matches your rod. Who cares that it's a 4wt line that casts perfectly on your 7wt rod? Fish more and stop pissing on yourself. What a joke!
 
Rob, how is it possible for you to make so many ridiculous comments that literally have little to no basis in truth? All you need to say is nothing, and you could learn the reason for how line weights are labeled today versus the past. If you don’t know why things are the way they are, you don’t need to make up nonsense.

How can someone “abuse” their rod if it is performing the way they want it to?
Because they don't know how the rod was designed.. the end user is NOT the expert.
That includes most guides.

How can i say it? 15 years of manufacturing and repairing said rods.a .. .

You may call me an idiot on lots of issues but not this one.
 
Because they don't know how the rod was designed.. the end user is NOT the expert.
That includes most guides.

How can i say it? 15 years of manufacturing and repairing said rods.a .. .

You may call me an idiot on lots of issues but not this one.
You are calling lines overweight because the total weight of the head is more than the AFTMA standard. That shows your lack of knowledge, Rob. AFTMA is a weight for the first 30 feet of line, regardless of head length or taper. The only exception to this is Spey, which is a lot more complicated. You’ll notice that even Spey lines have different AFTMA weights depending on the type of line or head (https://www.affta.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/01/spey_line_weights.pdf).

Here’s the standard weight chart for reference https://www.affta.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/01/fly_line_weight_specs.pdf
 

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