SRC & Crabs

Tacoma Red

Active Member
Folks,

In the following article by Joe Jaquet, he found that 83% of SRC stomach contents in South Puget Sound SRC contain in order by % weight.

1) Chum Eggs 26%
2) Chum Fry 20%
3) Polychaete Worms 12%
4) Shiner Perch 9%
5) "Shrimp" 6.7%
6) Amphipods 4%
7) Herring 4%
8) Pacific Sandlance 2.9%
9) Clam Necks 2.7%
10) Surf Smelt 2.7%
...Crabs 0.6%

46% by weight was Chum diet!

"Summary of Results
  1. Salmon eggs and chum salmon fry frequently occurred (46% by weight) in the diet of 115 coastal cutthroat in South Puget Sound.
  2. Cutthroat over 300 mm consumed most of the salmon eggs, chum salmon fry and non-salmon fish. Cutthroat less than 300 mm consumed invertebrates, few chum salmon fry and non-salmon fish, and no salmon eggs. The length-diet relationship is not highly significant (Chi square P(0.11) with 2 df).
  3. Apparently cutthroat consume salmon eggs and chum salmon fry when they are available in the estuary and shift to alternative food items when they are absent. This occurs when numerous other prey items available. Sample sizes were too small for diet comparisons of coastal cutthroat length by salmon presence/absence. "
Coastal Cutthroat Trout (Oncorhynchus clarki clarki) Diet In South Puget Sound, Washington 1999 – 2002
http://docs.streamnetlibrary.org/CoastalCutthroatData/sn600219.pdf



Obviously the Southern 5 sections of Puget Sound are full of mud flats, tremendous areas of polychaete habitat, and it is home to the regions largest chum salmon runs.

The "Green Weenie Fly" developed by Richard Stoll and detailed in his book states that the fly was designed to imitate the megalops stage of crab development...as Bob Triggs also posted.


There are addition sources that focus more of the Northern Puget Sound, Hood Canal (Hood's Channel), Strait of Juan de Fuca, and Coastal Nearshore regions and during Spring to Summer months.
The general summary is:
- Herring, Sandlance, Surf smelt, and Juvenile Salmonids, are the primary food sources of Northern Puget Sound, the Strait, and Coastal nearshore region.
- Gammarid amphipods, "Shrimp", isopods, sand lance, and chum fry, are the primary food sources within the Hood Canal region.
 

Stonefish

Triploid, Humpy & Seaplane Hater....Know Grizzler
Great article TR.
I really appreciate the knowledge of the forum member here.
It looks like they do eat crabs, but they are not high on their dining menu.
Thanks to all that have responded.
SF
 

Don Freeman

Free Man
Good job TR, I just thought of Joe's study this morning, but hadn't opened it up. Currently, James Losee, Larry Phillips (WDFW), Joe Jaquet and Bill Young are in the wrap up phase of publishing their study on clarki in the south sound. It covers a lot of data; from spawning and diet to migrations. Literally years in the making.
 

Tacoma Red

Active Member
Good job TR, I just thought of Joe's study this morning, but hadn't opened it up. Currently, James Losee, Larry Phillips (WDFW), Joe Jaquet and Bill Young are in the wrap up phase of publishing their study on clarki in the south sound. It covers a lot of data; from spawning and diet to migrations. Literally years in the making.
Don please let us know when the report is published. I'm anxious to read it.
Thanks!
 

Stonefish

Triploid, Humpy & Seaplane Hater....Know Grizzler
Don,
I like to see that study as well.

Red,
I got a chance to briefly browse the study link you posted.....before mowing the lawn.
There is a ton of useful information in there that folks can use to improve their own searun fishing.
A Puget Sound arrow goby is a new one to me. Now that I know what they look like I plan to tie up some patterns that look like them. I always thought many of the small fish I
I also need to up my shiner perch and marine worm game. I've caught some on worms patterns but need to give it a better effort.
It also looked like when crabs showed up in the diet samples, they were preferred by the larger 400+ mm fish.
Thanks again for posting that report.
SF
 

Tacoma Red

Active Member
In the book A Fly-Fisher's Guide to Saltwater Naturals and Their Imitations by George V. Roberts Jr. there are nice descriptions of Gobies as well as sculpins, however, the book favors East Coast species and fisheries. The flies for gobies are basically sculpin patterns -Whitlock Series-(although with brighter green tails) and the book mentions Loring D. Wilson as a creator of goby patterns representing the species of East, West, and Gulf Coasts. With over a hundred species of saltwater sculpins in North America (13 in the Atlantic) and seventy for gobies I'm sure there is a wide variation. The only reference I can find for Wilson is for terrestrial patterns

Gobies can be more variably colored than sculpins, often brightly, and many species are capable of rapid changes in color and pattern. I think I've seen sculpins do the same when excited.
 

Mark Mercer

Member
I'd be surprised if cutt's didn't eat small crabs, they eat snails (in lakes, even with hard shells) crawdads, gardner snakes and pretty much anything they can get in there mouth. Think I'll tie up a few crab patterns, just to see, never tried one.

Thanks Brian for braving the nasty weather and posting this.
 

cabezon

Sculpin Enterprises
WFF Supporter
Gobies can be more variably colored than sculpins, often brightly, and many species are capable of rapid changes in color and pattern. I think I've seen sculpins do the same when excited.
Gobies comes in two flavors: very flamboyant (and perhaps chemically-defended according to a talk I heard at a recent conference) or very cryptic, like most of our sculpins. The local gobies are certainly in the cryptic category. Their colors and patterns match those of the soft sediments that they inhabit, such as shelly-sand or mud, and they dive into a nearby burrow if threatened. They dart much like sculpins. The same patterns would apply to either, except gobies have smaller heads and pectoral fins.
Steve
 

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