SRC & Crabs

Dipnet

The wanted posters say Tim Hartman
WFF Supporter
Good job TR, I just thought of Joe's study this morning, but hadn't opened it up. Currently, James Losee, Larry Phillips (WDFW), Joe Jaquet and Bill Young are in the wrap up phase of publishing their study on clarki in the south sound. It covers a lot of data; from spawning and diet to migrations. Literally years in the making.
Don, so it's now 8 months later than when you posted this. Has this SRC study been published or do you know when it will be?
TIA!
 

Don Freeman

Free Man
Good timing. James is coming to the South Sound FF meeting Nov 17 to update us on the progress of their paper and ongoing studies. They have some new and different projects going. You are more than welcome to attend, and I expect an article on it in the next newsletter.

I may announce the club program here under events.

When everything goes public, I plan to make the work available here.

Don
 

Shad

Active Member
I'm not surprised that they eat a lot of chum eggs (I think just about all the local fish eat them). Chum fry are a known favorite in the spring, but as @miyawaki said, the fish can be pretty picky about their imitations.

I think I missed a detail or three along the way, because I'm struggling with how cutts could have both chum eggs and chum fry in their stomachs at the same time. Did the study conglomerate stomach content data from a full year or something, or were they actually finding eggs and fry at the same time?
 
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Preston Singletary

Active Member
I believe that Joe Jauquet's diet study indicates that most of the chum egg consumption occurs during winter when periodic high-water events scour the chum redds, allowing partially mature eggs to float downstream.
 

wetswinger

Active Member
Read summary #3. They load up on fry and eggs when available and shift to other food when not. Think I’ll tie up some worm patterns for down here in the mud!
 

Mark Mercer

Member
Even though Brian started this thread in 2015 I'm pretty sure cutt's have no problem eating critters with shells, I've seen them inhale adult craw fish (fresh water) so I think a small crab or sand shrimp wouldn't be a problem for them. Cleaned lots of rezzie's with crab larva and sand shrimp shells in them so doubt it's any different with cutt's ?
 

Bob Smith

Active Member
WFF Supporter
I love this topic! Here is the complete prey list from a coastal cutthroat feeding ecology study in the Salmon River estuary on the northern Oregon coast. This particular population resides in the lower estuary for much of the year (similar to PS) instead of heading to the ocean. Crab (Brachyura) parts along with crab zoea are included and occurred about 15% of the time in fish taken from two of the sample sites.

Pelagic Fish:
Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), Northern anchovy (Engraulis mordax), Pacific herring (Clupea harengus), Shiner perch (Cymatogaster aggregata), Surf smelt (Hypomesus pretiosus)

Benthic Fish:
Pacific staghorn sculpin (Leptocottus armatus), Prickly sculpin (Cottus asper), Saddleback gunnel (Pholis ornata), Flatfish spp. (family Pleuronectidae), Pacific sand lance (Ammodytes hexapterus)

Estuarine Invertebrates:
Isopoda, Eogammarus spp., Corophium spp., Crangon spp., Cirripedia, Brachyura Zoea, Brachyura parts, Mysidae, Polychaeta, Nematoda

Terrestrial Invertebrates:
Soldier Beetle (family Cantharoidae), Ladybug (genus Coccinellidae)
 
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Stonefish

Triploid, Humpy & Seaplane Hater....Know Grizzler
I love this topic! Here is the complete prey list from a coastal cutthroat feeding ecology study in the Salmon River estuary on the northern Oregon coast. This particular population resides in the lower estuary for three or four months instead of heading to the ocean. Crab (Brachyura) parts along with crab zoea are included and occurred about 15% of the time in fish taken from two of the sample sites.

Pelagic Fish:
Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), Northern anchovy (Engraulis mordax), Pacific herring (Clupea harengus), Shiner perch (Cymatogaster aggregata), Surf smelt (Hypomesus pretiosus)

Benthic Fish:
Pacific staghorn sculpin (Leptocottus armatus), Prickly sculpin (Cottus asper), Saddleback gunnel (Pholis ornata), Flatfish spp. (family Pleuronectidae), Pacific sand lance (Ammodytes hexapterus) Estuarine

Estuarine Invertebrates:
Isopoda, Eogammarus spp., Corophium spp., Crangon spp., Cirripedia, Brachyura Zoea, Brachyura parts, Mysidae, Polychaeta, Nematoda

Terrestrial Invertebrates:
Soldier Beetle (family Cantharoidae), Ladybug (genus Coccinellidae)
Bob,
That is a pretty diverse diet. Those fish would make the food pyramid folks proud!
Thanks for sharing that information.
SF
 

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