Couple of new ones fresh out of the dip tube

#17
Did you add some guides? The guides might add a touch of stiffness or better line control in the shooting of the line. Glad to hear your effort was rewarded with a couple of nice casting rods. They sure look nice.

Mike
 
#18
Nice work. Good to see new life in old things.
Did you add some guides? The guides might add a touch of stiffness or better line control in the shooting of the line. Glad to hear your effort was rewarded with a couple of nice casting rods. They sure look nice.

Mike
Yes I added three to make it 8 + stripping guide. The original rod's guides needed long-distance to call each other. That probably made a huge difference.

Ron
 
#19
Yes I added three to make it 8 + stripping guide. The original rod's guides needed long-distance to call each other. That probably made a huge difference.

Ron
The rule of thumb for number of guides is "Length of the rod +1". So, an 8' rod has 9 guides and a 9' rod has 10. For 7'6" or 8'6" rods, I like to "round up", i.e. 9 guides for the 7'6" rod and 10 for the 8'6" rod. There are lots of guide spacing charts available, and even formulas that calculate guide placement.

Many of the lower-end production bamboo rods didn't have enough guides, as they were trying to keep costs down and prices affordable. Adding the right number of guides can make these rods really come alive. It's a case where you are better off "refinishing" rather than trying to "restore" the rod to original specs.

Tom
 
#20
The rule of thumb for number of guides is "Length of the rod +1". So, an 8' rod has 9 guides and a 9' rod has 10. For 7'6" or 8'6" rods, I like to "round up", i.e. 9 guides for the 7'6" rod and 10 for the 8'6" rod. There are lots of guide spacing charts available, and even formulas that calculate guide placement.

Many of the lower-end production bamboo rods didn't have enough guides, as they were trying to keep costs down and prices affordable. Adding the right number of guides can make these rods really come alive. It's a case where you are better off "refinishing" rather than trying to "restore" the rod to original specs.

Tom
Thanks Tom. I've seen that rule of thumb before but wonder…do you count the stripping guide in that number or not? Just curious. For my choice on the Fishkill I compared it to the 8' Phillipson I own and considered the number and spacing of guides on it. That led me to the 8+stripping guide. I've heard of folks simply placing extra guides between the five existing guides on these to bump up the number without taking off original guides. I can see their reasoning but in the end the aesthetics of having neatly spaced guides won out and I stripped them all and started from scratch. Happy I did, although I had my doubts as the time to wrap all those extra trim wraps wore on and on. :)
 
#21
Ron, I usually include the stripping guide in the "length + 1" calculation, but I recall seeing where folks use this for the snake guides only, and then add the stripper. In practice, you have to adjust guide spacing to accommodate ferrules, and also the distance from the butt-end of the rod to the stripping guide (people with longer arms typically like the stripping guide farther up the rod). Though I don't do it very often, a good practice is to tape guides on the rod, insert your fly line, bend the rod, and see if the gap between the line and the rod is consistent. If not, adjust the guides accordingly.

On longer rods (over 8') be careful not to use too many guides on the tip section, and use the smallest guides you can for the line size. Additional weight is amplified the farther you get from the grip. A veteran rod maker with an engineering background explained this to me several years ago.

Tom
 

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