3wt. and 4wt. Bamboo Rod?

LCnSac

John or "LC"
#31
Come on out to the upcoming glass and grass conclave. It will be a wonderful opportunity to try a variety of rods and then you may get some new ideas of what's out there and what you might really like. Every bamboo rod is somewhat unique. Ron
Thanks, Ron, I'd love to, but it's a bit of a drive for me ;-)
 

Kent Lufkin

Remember when you could remember everything?
#32
Come on out to the upcoming glass and grass conclave. It will be a wonderful opportunity to try a variety of rods and then you may get some new ideas of what's out there and what you might really like. Every bamboo rod is somewhat unique. Ron
Unless I'm mistaken, the OP lives in Sacramento CA. If true, it's unlikely he's gonna be able to join us, no matter how much he'd like to.

K
 
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Kent Lufkin

Remember when you could remember everything?
#33
Kent, thanks for the recommendation. Notes like this from you, Mike, Greg and others have really helped me learn about bamboo.

As I had posted a few months ago, I bought a Zhu 6 wt. 8' rod. It's quite heavy, but for the money it was a good start. I'd like to improve on the quality, but do you think an Orvis 99 or Battenkill in the 8' length would feel lighter in the hand while casting?

I don't feel the need for great length, even from the pontoon. If I experiment enough with lines, I can throw them with a 7'-7.5' rod as far as needed without incidents in most cases. although 7' is pushing it. I'm more concerned about the swing weight and fishability. I think a long rod would be a little more progressive?

In glass, it seems like 8' is the sweet spot for most rods. I don't know if bamboo is the same. I'm guessing it's a bit shorter.
Happy to help, if only in a small way. Due to their solid (as opposed to tubular) construction and the material they're made from, cane rods ARE heavier than plastic ones. Adjusting to their increased weight and the inertia and energy required to cast them is part of the learning curve in switching from one type of rod to the other. OTOH, the effort is well worth the time to master the difference in casting a cane rod well.

K