tiny stillwater mayfly

WT

Active Member
Couds of these little guys ( apron. size 22 or 24) one evening on Lake Chopaka. What are they?
IMG_2706.jpg
 

Lugan

Joe Streamer
I was going to guess trico too, but I usually think of tricos as having a black thorax and these appear brown. Are there such color variations in the species?
 

Mike Ediger

Active Member
WFF Supporter
Yep. I know tricos and spinners are two different stages of a mayflies life span, but I carry tricos and spinners in black, rust, yellow and olive. Black and olive seem to work the best for me. Rust can work but not sure I have ever caught a fish on a yellow spinner.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Lugan

Joe Streamer
Yep. I know tricos and spinners are two different stages of a mayflies life span, but I carry tricos and spinners in black, rust, yellow and olive. Black and olive seem to work the best for me. Rust can work but not sure I have ever caught a fish on a yellow spinner.
Mike, trico is a mayfly genus (Tricorythodes), not a life stage. Life stage is egg --> nymph --> emerger --> dun --> adult spinner --> spent spinner?
 

Mike Ediger

Active Member
WFF Supporter
Mike, trico is a mayfly genus (Tricorythodes), not a life stage. Life stage is egg --> nymph --> emerger --> dun --> adult spinner --> spent spinner?
Thanks Lugan, my bad. I didn't say what I meant. What I meant was I know the pics of tricos that you showed weren't spinners, but I don't often carry each color of every life stage of every genus or species of mayfly. I often fish either small parachute mayfly patterns for adults or a spinner pattern of the various colors that I see. The real point was just that I fish various colors of duns or spinners regardless what it actually is. Not sure I made myself any more clear, but I apologize for the confusion.
Plus, when you start talking genus and species you are already over my head, I probably shouldn't have replied anyway. :D
 
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triploidjunkie

Active Member
I see those on the Columbia sometimes, and have always thought they were tricos too. Interesting. They must be really tasty to trout, because during an evening spinnerfall the trout(even really big trout), often key in on those and ignore all else.
 

dbk

Active Member
The Caenis emergences at Chopaka are epic.. and in the evenings the trout as TP said can be totally keyed on these to exclusion of everything else. Matching the hatch with such small bugs is tough enough- let alone when your bugs is "one among thousands" of naturals. If anyone has had consistent success fishing the caenis emergence at Chopaka (or anywhere for that matter) I would be curious to get your thoughts on both patterns and presentation..
 

Preston

Active Member
DSCF0036.JPG
DSCF2627.JPG
Caenis nymphs crawl ashore prior to molting into the dun (subimago) form, the swarms at Chopaka are the subimagos preparing to molt into the spinner (imago) form. The female spinners will be the only form which will become readily available to the fish, and only after the males and females have mated and the females are prepared to lay their eggs. Egg laying takes place overnight and in the early morning. Most are eaten as spent spinners; that is, females who are dying or have died after laying their eggs. Be prepared to go very small, 26 is about right.
 

Preston

Active Member
Tails: paintbrush fibers
Abdomen: cream colored thread
Thorax: built up with cream-colored thread with Swisstraw or floss overlay (colors vary from orange to brown).
 

zen leecher aka bill w

born to work, forced to fish
#26 mayflies on a lake would be fun!
They're fun in two ways....one trying to hook a fish and two.... trying to get the hook out of the fish's mouth. On step one I've found that offsetting the hookpoint helps out. My hookup rate on the small hooks are in the range of 20%. YRMV.
 

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